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Found 324 Collections

 

Origins: U.S. Constitution

#SJ2019LP

Matthew Montes
30
 

Pigs!

Some of my favorite pigs, hogs, and boars from across the Smithsonian collection.

Darren Milligan
54
 

Exploring Korean Art at the Freer|Sackler

This Learning Lab contains introductory materials to help educators explore Korean art from Freer|Sackler collections with students.  It includes the following:

  • a founding history of Korean art collections at the Freer|Sackler
  • an illustrated timeline of Korea
  • a map of major ceramic production sites in Korea
  • images and information regarding rare Buddhist paintings from the Goryeo dynasty (935-1392)
  • definitions and examples of selected clay, decoration, glaze, pigment, and symbol types in Korean art
  • Freer Gallery of Art audio tour selections of Korean art
  • curator videos from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018
  • related educator resources from other museums
  • teacher-created lessons and Learning Lab Collections from Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer Institute for Educators held at the Freer|Sackler, Summer 2018

Tags: Korea, Goryeo, archaeology, art, celadon, ceramics, painting, symbols, Buddhism

Freer|Sackler Education
111
 

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Martin Luther King, Jr. found inspiration in Henry David Thoreau. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Grace Davis
49
 

Doorways & Passages

Doorways are the transition point from one place to another.  They can be functional, decorative, symbolic, or a combination of all three.  Work with a partner to view and discuss a selection of doorways.

  • What does it look like?
  • What is it made of?
  • Where do you think it leads?
  • How does it impact the viewer or person who might want to enter/exit?

ART MAKING CHALLENGES: 

  • Design a doorway or passageway that symbolizes what happens inside.
  • Design a doorway or passageway that links a physical place to an imaginary one.
  • Design a doorway to represent a transition from one period of your life to another. 

Jean-Marie Galing
31
 

Access Series: Nostalgic Popular "Pop" Culture

This inspiration collection of nostalgic popular "pop" culture from the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s and 2000s—super heroes and super villains, Muppets, cartoon characters, Star Wars, Disney and Pixar characters, Transformers, and movies was used for a collage activity and discussion prompt in an informal learning activity, "Me & My World: Personal Ecology/Interest Inventory" with a group of teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. Students were asked about their favorite pop culture influences from the past and present. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for a discussion prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
95
 

Access Series: Flying Things

This topical collection of airplanes, hot air balloons, space craft, and other things that fly, was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials). It was used as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program--as pre-museum visit preparation to artifacts that would be found at an airplane museum. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could fly anywhere, where would you go and what would you do?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, all access digital arts program

Tracie Spinale
100
 

Access Series: Meta Collage

This topical collection of artworks is all about collage. Collage is a technique that uses other pieces of artwork assembled into a new artwork. The collection was originally used in a collage art activity to provide inspiration examples of the art of collage-making, based upon personal interests. It was used with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program.

Descriptors: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment

Tracie Spinale
31
 

Access Series: People, Friends, and Family--Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
134
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
278
 

Access Series: Places "Real" and "Imagined"

This topical collection of artworks is based upon a wide variety of places and travel spots, both "real" and "imagined." It features castles, mountains, beaches, forests, capital cities, and fantasy movie landscapes. It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Students were asked about famous places they have visited or would want to visit, as well as favorite vacation or travel spots. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could travel anywhere, where would you go, and who would you travel with, etc...?" Use the visible thinking routine "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
72
 

Access Series: Fantastic Creatures

This topical collection of artworks is based upon "fantastical things." It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, utilizing the "See|Think|Wonder" visible thinking routine. You could also pair the collection with popular young adult fantasy novels, and ancient myths and legends.

Descriptors: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
64
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

SENSES SERIES

Aggregate of Learning Lab collections about the Smithsonian collaboration with the Science for Monks and Nuns Program - senses and sensory perception.

Tracie Spinale
11
 

Inlaid Imagery: A Different Way to Draw through Korean Ceramics

This collection briefly introduces the art of incision and inlay in ancient Korean ceramics as a unique method of creating imagery that can be both meaningful and beautiful. While these traditional ceramics known as celadon were not unique to Korea, as a functional art form they did reach new heights of craft and expression during the Goryeo Dynasty (935-1392) thanks to design innovations. One of the most notable modifications made by Korean potters was the practice of cutting away some clay (incising) and adding a different type (inlay), to create contrasts, patterns, shapes, images, and other visual and physical effects. 

As with other kinds of traditional Korean visual art, the images created on ceramics include familiar Korean folks motifs such as animals, plants, or elements of nature that carried specific aspirational meanings. This collection also provides examples of such folk images portrayed in ceramics, and explores some examples of such symbolism, as an inspiration for users to create their own images in a creative workshop. 

In terms of end goals, this collection will:

  1. Introduce Korean traditional incised ceramics 
  2. Help users learn to recognize the technique
  3. Introduce Korean folk images portrayed in such ceramics, and their symbolic nature
  4. Inspire users to create their own Korean folk-style image
Adam Wojciechowicz
16
 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

Latin American Artists

Latin American works from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University. The works represent a timeline that spans thousands of years from pre colombian to present day.

#LatinoHAC

Mirmac16
28
 

Christmas Past and Present for First Grade

How did families celebrate Christmas then and now?

1.H.1.2 Explain the importance of folklore and celebrations and their impact on local communities.


Christina Hawkins
6
 

Exploration of Different Gold Mining Tools and Techniques, at Columbia State Historic Park

Historical images of placer gold mining tools and techniques used, in Columbia, CA may be used for learning different placer gold mining techniques. These visual aids may provide a better understanding of how the types of mining tools changed over time, in Columbia, CA. As the California Gold Rush began miners traveled throughout the Sierra Nevada foothills, in search for gold. These miners traveled with very few items; some which included a gold pan, pick and shovel for easier travel. As more gold was discovered, mining parties established mining camps or tent towns; and, the cradle or rocker box was used to wash gold. Further development of mining camps brought in the use of long toms, sluice boxes and water diversions created for mining. The history of Columbia State Historic Park follows this storyline, but evolved into a full-scale mining town. Eighty-Seven Million dollars worth of gold, in the 1860s prices (Twelve to Sixteen dollars per ounce vs. current price of gold is over One Thousand dollars) was extracted from Columbia, CA. The amount of gold not only attracted miners, but business people, as well. In the mid 1850s, brick buildings with iron doors were built to provide more stable structures for the strong merchant economy. Today Columbia State Historic Park is home to the largest collection of gold rush era brick buildings, in California; whereas, structures of other mining camps of the California Gold Rush no longer exist.    

Columbia State Historic Park
7
 

The California Gold Rush: A Journey to the Goldfields

The famous discovery of gold in California, forever changed the landscape, economy and culture of California by the hundreds of thousands of people who migrated during California's gold rush. The famous discovery was made by James Marshall, at Sutter's Mill, on January 24th, 1848. Rumors and stories spread throughout the land of the discovery of gold, in California. The discovery was confirmed by President Polk,  11th President of the United States. President Polk made the announcement of the gold discovery, in California and the news spread world wide. Hundreds of thousands of people migrated to California from all around the world during the California Gold Rush of 1849. The journeys were long and dangerous. The three major routes are: around Cape Horn by ship (six to eight months), the Isthmus of Panama (two to three months), and the Overland trail (three to five months). By ship, dangers included: ship wrecks, lack of food and water, seasickness and disease. Ships that survived the long journeys arrived to the ports of San Francisco, where the migrants continued their journeys to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada.

Traveling 2,000 miles across an entire nation, on the Overland Trail by foot and wagons, exposed travelers other dangers, such as: misinformed trails, lack of food and water, and exposed them to inclimate weather while crossing deadly rivers, deserts, and high mountain passes. Only the very basic necessities were taken for these long journeys on the Overland trail; such as: food, water, wagons, stock, hunting tools, blacksmithing tools, clothing, blankets, sewing kits, medical supplies, etc.

On the Overland Trail, many miners joined companies. These companies were made up of people with various skills; such as, carpentry, medicine, navigation, hunting, blacksmithing and wheelwrights. The likelihood of surviving these long and dangerous journeys increased, significantly for those individuals who joined companies. If a company survived the journey to California on the Overland Trail, the company also had a higher likelihood of success in gold mining. Individuals within the company could stake multiple gold mining claims and the gold would then be divided among the people of the company. During the gold rush, individuals were only allowed to own one claim.  


Columbia State Historic Park
15
 

California Gold Rush History: Columbia California's Culture Expressed Through Historic Photos

The culture of Columbia expressed through a collection of historic photos.

Columbia State Historic Park
19
 

California Gold Rush Era Mining Technique Photos

Mining techniques evolved over time with development of larger mining companies. These photos also show cultural diversity during the California Gold Rush. 

Columbia State Historic Park
11
 

California Gold Rush Introduction

A collection complied to assist students and educators with visual aids for educational programs pertaining to the introduction of California Gold Rush History. James Marshall discovered gold in the year of 1848, along the American River, at Sutter's Mill (present day Coloma, California). President Polk, the 11th President of the United States made a landmark announcement to the world of Marshall's discovery. The news from President Polk started one of the largest mass migration of individuals to one place ever in recorded history. Between 1848 and 1852, California's population grew from 14,000 to 223,000. The gold rush was an opportunity for migrants to make a better life for themselves and families. By ship around Cape Horn, by foot through the Isthmus of Panama, or the overland trails by wagon, travels to the Territory of California were long and deadly. Those who survived the journeys fulfilled the dream of Westward migration. These migrations connected cultures from all over the world to develop the diverse population and abundance in opportunity that lives on, in California today.

Columbia State Historic Park
21
 

Historical Chinese Apothecary Exhibit of California Gold Rush Mining Town, at Columbia State Historic Park.

The population of California grew from 14,000 to 223,000 between the years of 1848 to 1852. During the California Gold Rush, people from different cultures migrated from all over the world, all sharing the same hopes of creating better lives for themselves and their families. The rich cultural diversity we find in California today can be traced back to many families from the earliest days of the State of California, through cultural artifacts. Columbia State Historic Park has the largest collection of gold rush brick buildings in California. This collection of 1850s gold rush era brick buildings is a living museum of cultural artifacts dated back to the diverse merchant economy that once thrived in Columbia, CA. During the gold rush, Columbia became one of the fifth largest cities in California, with one hundred and fifty businesses during the peak of Columbia's success. The Chinese population in Columbia owned a variety of different businesses; such as dry goods, boarding houses, laundry services, restaurants, and more. Originally, the Chinese population was located on the Western edge of town. In the late 1850s and 1860s, the Chinese began purchasing buildings from French merchants. The town's history of destructive fires and the rise and fall of the merchant economy shaped the reduction of the architectural landscape visitors find today, at Columbia State Historic Park. Many of the brick buildings survived it all and have been restored for visitors to enjoy today. Visitors of Columbia State Historic Park may view the Chinese Store exhibit through windows that display a large collection of Chinese artifacts. This collection of photos provides a closer look at the inside of the Chinese exhibit. Fong Yue Po, from the Yee Phong Herb Company, Sacramento, CA, donated many artifacts used in this exhibit.

Columbia State Historic Park
16
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