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Found 875 Collections

 

G is for Victory

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring gardens. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about gardening, learn about victory gardens, learn about seeds, and listen to a Peter Rabbit read aloud. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Portraits of Black Children in America Photography Collection

A study of Black youth in America throughout the decades

Andrea Castellano
27
 

Teaching for Community without a Classroom: Leveraging Digital Museum Resources for Distance Learning

This collection serves as a companion resource for the Community Works Institute conference series, Teaching for Community without a Classroom. 

The session will introduce participants to the Smithsonian Learning Lab, a free platform that gives users access to millions of digital resources from across the Smithsonian and beyond, as well as the tools to create interactive learning experiences with them. This session will also include an activity exploring Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" to help students think critically and globally, as well as techniques to consider personal experiences and their connection to museum resources.

Included here are an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, examples of activities using museum objects and personal stories, and supporting materials. This collection is adapted from a larger teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. 

This collection was co-created with Matthew Decker, Jamie Gillan, and  Tess Porter.  

Keywords: #CommunityInVirtualEd, #LatinoHAC, Latinx, Latino, global competency, competencies, CWI, 3ys

Philippa Rappoport
24
 

Design It Yourself: Design Transportation

Follow along to design a way to make transportation more comfortable. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design Camouflage

Follow along to explore camouflage and design a way to camouflage a 2-dimensional object in its surroundings. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Interior Space

Follow along to design a model of an interior space inspired by the work of IwamotoScott Architecture, 2019 National Design Award winner for Interior Design. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Watch

Follow along to design a watch inspired by Patricia Moore, 2019 National Design Award winner for Design Mind.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
15
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Utensil

Follow along to design an unusual utensil. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Streetscape

Follow the steps to design a streetscape. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Pencil

Follow along to design a pencil that will be comfortable to hold through a long school day.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Mobile Food Service

Follow along to design a mobile food service that helps to get locally grown food to your home.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Habitat

Follow along to design a habitat that can exist within an urban space.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Green Roof

Follow along to design a green roof or roof garden that will help keep a city or building cool.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Bus Stop

Follow along to design a bus stop that keeps you warm. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
11
 

Design It Yourself: Design Eyewear

Follow along to design eyeglasses inspired by the work of Derek Lam, 2019 National Design Award winner for Fashion Design. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
17
 

MAKE IT: Coffee Filter Sculpture

In this HIRSHHORN KIDS at home project, you will transform a flat coffee filter into a sculptural work of art inspired by artist Sam Gilliam. All you need is a coffee filter, some markers, and a spray bottle or cup of water. 

time: 30–40 minutes | skill level: beginner | topic: 2D to 3D transformation 


About HIRSHHORN KIDS at home

Want to be creative at home? Bring the joy of HIRSHHORN KIDS into your home with unique hands-on projects inspired by the artists in our collection. Projects are designed to keep kids of all ages engaged and interested in exploring art and making. New projects are released every week at [add landing page] and here on the Learning Lab.


HirshhornKidsAtHome
14
 

Area Artists: Washington, D.C.

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore three different visual artists with ties to Washington, D.C.

As a black women artists, Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones encountered many barriers to success. All three artists lived and worked in Washington, D.C. throughout their careers. They contributed to the social, artistic, and academic communities within the nation's capital and beyond. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones, and their approaches to art and art making. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their knowledge of Washington D.C. history and foster an appreciation for great artists. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • Who are Alma Thomas, Elizabeth Catlett, and Loïs Mailou Jones?
  • How were these artists' personal lives and artistic practices shaped by their time in Washington, D.C.?
  • What inspired each artist to create their works?
  • How are the artists' works similar? How are they different?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
13
 

Caretakers: Music Match Activity

Work with your student to match artwork to music as a way to think about the various ways in which emotions are expressed in art.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
20
 

Caretakers: Describe & Draw Activity

A fun game for students to practice their listening and speaking/descriptive skills! 

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
14
 

Caretakers: Bringing Art to Life Activity

Encourage your student to get creative with what's around the home and recreate an artwork!

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
11
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Poster

Follow along to use elements such as color, line, and composition to design a poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
24
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme: “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges"

This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. 

Included here: 

  • Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. 
  • Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  
  • Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.
  • Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.

This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," and then adapted for the 2020 program on the theme, “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges". 

Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
43
 

Design it Yourself: Design a Prototype for a User

Learn to think like a designer by prototyping a solution engineered for a specific user. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
23
 

Reform Movements of the 1800s

As we begin to learn about antislavery (abolition), the women's rights movement, education reform, labor reform, and other movements of the 1800s, consider how these items and images speak for history.

Elaine Levia
17
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