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Found 562 Collections

 

Capturing Culture: Using American Portraits to Examine the Principles of Culture

In this lesson, students will closely examine historical images and analyze those images using a variety of close reading and close looking strategies.  Then, students will draw connections between the images and the Principles of Culture that are applied throughout their study of culture and religion in Unit 4.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teaching Institute.   #NPGTeach

Lisa Esposito
17
 

Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Perhaps the most famous of the Indian boarding schools created in the late 19th century, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania was founded by Captain Richard Henry Pratt (with funding and support from the United States government), with the purpose of assimilating (or Americanizing) Indian students.

Student will use archival materials to explore student life at Carlisle Indian School and to evaluate assimilation policy as practiced through the school. What was gained and lost through the process of assimilation?

Using these resources as a starting point, users should research one former Indian student or one aspect of student life using the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center. Many student files record not only experiences that occurred while at the school, but information about occupations and life after the boarding school experience. Were students and families able to shape positive experiences despite the intended consequences of boarding school policy?

Students should create a writing or artwork that reflects information learned about that particular student or activity and that shares the learner's opinions on assimilation policy and the response of Native Americans. How should the Carlisle Indian School be remembered?

Tags: Native American, Indian, boarding school, assimilation, Pratt, Dawes Act, Jim Thorpe, allotment

Kate Harris
32
 

Carnival Celebrations: Masks (Lesson Plans, Activities, and Background Information)

This collection comes from a set of lessons plans to introduce students to the culture of Puerto Rico by looking at customs and objects - specifically masks - connected to the annual celebration of Carnival. The lessons are split into four levels, covering grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12. They were originally adapted from a set of activities that appeared in Our Story in History: A Puerto Rican Carnival, a website produced by the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History - also shown in a link inside the collection, along with instructions for students to make their own masks. The lessons include objects from the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian in New York, the George Gustav Heye Center, and the Department of Anthropology, National Museum of Natural History.


Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Castro - The Impact of the Civil War on Society

Students will explore these sources to spark inquiry and investigation about how the Civil War impacted American society. 

  • Students can complete the sorting activity to categorize the images. 
  • Students should select one source they find most intriguing and generate questions  about the source and its related topic by completing the quiz question. 
Jose Castro
30
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

Changing Perspectives on Work in America

This is a collection that allows students to examine the role of the worker in the American Experience and how it has changed over time. #SAAMteach

Anne Marie Hudak
7
 

Changing Places and Never Let Me Go

Hey Guys!

Here is your challenge for the day.  

You are going to look at a series of photos today taken at the same location over multiple years. The photos are in chronological order.  Take your time to look at each photo carefully to spot the changes that you see.  Look at each photo individually and then look at the series as a whole. At the end of the series, I want you to write down some of the ways in which the series of photos reflects the characters, plot, and/or major themes of Never Let Me Go.  Be prepared to share with your neighbors some of what you experienced.

If you finish early, take a look at the painting titled "Waiting Room."  What parallels do you see between Never Let Me Go and the thematic elements present in the painting?  Be prepared to share.

#SAAMteach

Michelle Fortier
7
 

Character & Setting

This collection focuses on exploring characters and settings, as well as how the two can be used together for a specific purpose. I used this collection to demonstrate to students how characters and settings impact one another.

#PZPGH

C.Harris
6
 

Charles Messier: Comet Ferret

Charles Messier was an eighteenth century astronomer whose specialty was searching for comets. He observed at an observatory atop the Hotel Cluny which was financed by the French Navy.

Arthur Glaser
24
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

mike mickelson
26
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

Arthur Glaser
17
 

China's Terracotta Army: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will analyze figures from the Terracotta Army, made for China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE), in order to explore the artistic practices of a newly unified China during the Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE). Students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in the terracotta warrior figures before designing their own papercraft terracotta warrior.

The Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta warriors and horses, was created for Emperor Qin Shihuang to form a small part of his elaborate tomb complex. These figures are significant not only because of their artistic realism, detail, and diversity, but also because of their rarity – the majority of surviving objects from this time period have been found in Emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb complex.

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; see wonder connect; project zero; visible thinking routine; strategy; maker; art making; papercraft; terra cotta; shihuangdi; shi huangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

#visiblethinking

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
20
 

China’s Terracotta Army: Exploring the Tomb Complex and Values of China’s First Emperor

In this activity, students will take on the role of archaeologists and make inferences about what objects included in the elaborate tomb complex of China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE) can reveal about his values, afterlife beliefs, and how he saw himself and his world. Students will analyze objects including not only members of the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 terracotta soldiers and horses, but also terracotta acrobats, bronze waterfowl, and more. This collection is Part 3 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; cross-cultural comparison; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
25
 

China’s Terracotta Army: Introduction to China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Army

In this activity, students will learn about the life, achievements, and historical legacy of the First Emperor of China, Emperor Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). In order to understand why he, and the developments he shaped, are so historically significant, students will explore objects from the Qin (221 – 206 BCE) and Han (206 BCE – 220 CE) dynasties and use information learned to create arguments about the past. This collection is Part 1 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; leader; see wonder connect; headlines; strategy; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
10
 

China’s Terracotta Army: The Terracotta Warriors

In this activity, students explore the Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 terracotta figures of warriors and horses made for China’s First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE). After learning about Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE) afterlife beliefs analyzing the types of figures, layout of pits, and other object included, students will create their own arguments about what the Terracotta Army reveals about Emperor Qin Shihuang. This collection is Part 2 in a series of collections created for a social studies classroom; for more information, click “Read More.”

Objects found in Emperor Qin Shihuang’s elaborate tomb complex, which covers a total area of 17.6 square miles, make up the majority of surviving objects from this significant period in Chinese history. They are some of the best archaeological evidence researchers have for understanding the spiritual beliefs, military practices, and values of the ruler responsible for unifying China for the first time in its history. 

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; cross-cultural comparison; think puzzle explore; strategy; project zero; visible thinking routine; terra cotta; qin shi huang; shihuangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
18
 

Chinese Gold Miners

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American gold miners. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
4
 

Chinese Wok: Object Analysis

In this activity, you will learn about Chinese American traditions and culture through resources related to cooking and community. Each artifact, video and image includes questions that will help you think about the significance of each and its connections to Chinese American communities.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.  

 #APA2018

Christina Shepard
6
 

Civics Unit: Preamble

This introductory lesson of a civics unit is specially designed for middle school students with language-based learning disabilities. The lesson is focused on the Preamble to the United States Constitution using as a resource the piece of art entitled The Preamble, by Mike Wilkins, who used license plates from every state and the District of Columbia to write out the words of the Preamble phonetically. Vocabulary exercises and suggested extension activities are included.

Bruce Miller
8
 

Civil Rights Movement- Selma

This collection was created in conjuncture with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.The following collection showcases images of key figures such as Martin Luther King, and Malcolm X from the Civil Rights Movement, particularly on the issues of voting in Alabama. The images and activities showcase the struggle of the march from Selma to Montgomery in an effort to make voting an equal right among all people. This lesson can be used in the social studies classroom for the subjects of Civil Rights, Voting, and Federal Government VS State Government.  In addition to the images there are in class activities and thought provoking questions that go along with the visuals to provide for a more engaged learning experience. #NPGteach

Rakul Arza
16
 

Civil Rights Sculpture: Claim Support Question

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "Claim Support Question," a routine for clarifying truth claims, students will examine a portrait of Rosa Parks, a prominent civil rights activist whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger prompted the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott. After discussing the portrait with their peers, students will learn more about the arrest this sculpture depicts by reading the original police report, with notes by a Smithsonian curator.

Created for the 2016 National Portrait Gallery Summer Teacher Institute.

Keywords: african-american, black, civil rights movement, female, woman, women, segregation, NAACP, justice, arrest, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
2
 

Civil Rights: One Act - The 1968 Olympics

I created this small collection for my students to consider the roles of each individual in this photograph. When they engaged in the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine many of them wanted to know more about the white man wearing a medal and why he wasn't raising his fist. They generated many additional questions around this idea. I added the ESPN video to help the think more about the photo and its meaning. We had a class discussion that revisited their questions from the day before.

Ellen Rogers
7
 

Clarice Jessie Daley-WWI Nurse

Clarice Daley served as a nurse in the First World War (1914-1918) with the Australian Army Nursing Service. 

Keywords: women, history, military, 

Jodie Smith
8
 

Clarice Jessie Daley-WWI Nurse

Clarice Daley served as a nurse in the First World War (1914-1918) with the Australian Army Nursing Service. 

Keywords: women, history, military, 

Jessica Rosenberry
8
 

Classroom Activity Using Images of Immigration and Identity from the National Portrait Gallery, the New York Times, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Students can use the "What makes you say that?" and the "3 Ys" thinking routines to explore two modern portraits about identity and immigration from the National Portrait Gallery. The first thinking strategy asks students to look at a work of art for several minutes before answering two questions: "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" (See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

To further and deepen the discussion, I've included a link to a September 2016 New York Times Op-Doc entitled "4.1 Miles," about a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea. (If it doesn't show up easily, you can view the original video on Times Video at https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004674545/41-miles.html.) I've also included two sculptures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an interview with Lisa Sasaki, head of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Center, and resources from the University of Minnesota  Libraries Publishing's Immigration Syllabus - Americans / Immigrants, Weeks 1-4.

You may wish to use the "3 Y's" thinking routine here as well, which asks students to consider the following questions:

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

(See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

#APA2018, #LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 1: Precious Knowledge - Exploring notions of identity and community, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
14
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