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John Quincy Adams

National Portrait Gallery

John Quincy Adams

National Portrait Gallery

John Quincy Adams

National Portrait Gallery

John Quincy Adams Ward

National Portrait Gallery

John Quincy Adams Portrait

Smithsonian Archives - History Div
Daguerreotype

Portrait of John Quincy Adams. John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), President of the United States and Member of the House of Representatives, strongly supported acceptance of Smithson bequest and urged creation of an astronomical observatory.

John Quincy Adams' autograph

National Portrait Gallery

John Quincy Adams

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Pitcher, "John Adams"

National Museum of American History
This small creamware jug is decorated with a rare transfer print featuring a portrait of John Adams. The print is titled “John Adams President of the United States.” Above the portrait is a small Great Seal of the United States. Below is a cherub with quills and books. Under the spout is the phrase “Success to America” printed within a medallion. The reverse side is printed with an image of a spread-winged eagle with U. S. Shield. The eagle is encircled by a chain of sixteen links, each with a state’s name. Two states are misspelled: “Tenassee” and “Masachusetts.” Robert H. McCauley purchased this from the Collector’s Clock Shop in New York, NY on March 22, 1939 for $25.00.

This pitcher is part of the McCauley collection of American themed transfer print pottery. There is no mark on the pitcher to tell us who made it, but it is characteristic of wares made in large volume for the American market in both Staffordshire and Liverpool between 1790 and 1820. Pitchers of this shape, with a cream colored glaze over a pale earthenware clay, known as Liverpool type, were the most common vessels to feature transfer prints with subjects commemorating events and significant figures in the early decades of United States’ history. Notwithstanding the tense relationship between Britain and America, Liverpool and Staffordshire printers and potters seized the commercial opportunity offered them in the production of transfer printed earthenwares celebrating the heroes, the military victories, and the virtues of the young republic, and frequently all of these things at once.

Pitcher, "John Adams"

National Museum of American History
This creamware pitcher is decorated with three transfer-prints. On one side is a polychrome image of a ship with three masts. Below the spout is the Great Seal of the United States of America. On the reverse is a print featuring a likeness of John Adams surrounded by the allegorical figures of Justice, Plenty, and Cupid. Interestingly, the image of Adams looks dissimilar to other portraits of the President. The image may not even be based on Adams himself, but is probably a stock print. This pitcher likely dates to c. 1800. Robert H. McCauley purchased this pitcher from Parke- Burnet Galleries in New York City for $85.00 on June 22, 1944

This pitcher is part of the McCauley collection of American themed transfer print pottery. There is no mark on the pitcher to tell us who made it, but it is characteristic of wares made in large volume for the American market in both Staffordshire and Liverpool between 1790 and 1820. Pitchers of this shape, with a cream colored glaze over a pale earthenware clay, known as Liverpool type, were the most common vessels to feature transfer prints with subjects commemorating events and significant figures in the early decades of United States’ history. Notwithstanding the tense relationship between Britain and America, Liverpool and Staffordshire printers and potters seized the commercial opportunity offered them in the production of transfer printed earthenwares celebrating the heroes, the military victories, and the virtues of the young republic, and frequently all of these things at once.

President John Quincy Adams

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Mrs. John Quincy Adams

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Standing Nude [sculpture] / (photographed by John Adams)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: R. H. Recchia. Study for figure. Ownership unknown. Photographer: John Adams, Gloucester, Mass. recd fr Richard Recchia. Classification number: 282. Accession: 185998.

1 photographic print : b&w, 9 5/8 x 6 1/4 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. board.

Daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams

National Museum of American History

2c John Adams horizontal coil single

National Postal Museum
mint; vertical perf 10

2c John Adams vertical coil single

National Postal Museum
mint; horizontal perf 10

2c John Adams plate proof

National Postal Museum
Plate No. 22392

Denomination: 2c

Subject: John Adams, Presidential Issue

Color: rose carmine

Stuart Tod [sculpture] / (photographed by John Adams)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
On photo mount label: R. H. Recchia. Portrait bust of Mr. Stuart Tod. Ownership unknown. 1935. bronze. Photographer: John Adams. Gloucester, Mass. recd fr Richard Recchia. Classification number: 282/R. Accession: 185991.

1 photographic print : b&w, 9 5/8 x 6 3/4 in. (trimmed), mounted on 9 3/4 x 13 7/8 in. board.

John Quincy Adams Ward

National Portrait Gallery
John Quincy Adams Ward was the first distinctly American sculptor. His work resonates with the spirit of the age, rejecting Victorian sentimentality in favor of a hard-edged realism in representing forthrightly masculine figures. Even his allegorical subjects were remarkably realistic. For instance, Ward created Indian Hunter (1868), his first commission for Central Park, only after making an extensive study of Indians of the Northwest. His style appealed to the thrusting self-image of America's business and political leaders, as well as a public confident that America was emerging as an industrial and political power in the world.

2c John Adams plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No.21987

Denomination: 2c

Subject: John Adams, Presidential Issue

Color: rose carmine

2c John Adams plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No. 22210

Denomination: 2c

Subject: John Adams, Presidential Issue

Color: rose carmine

2c John Adams plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No. 22011

Denomination: 2c

Subject: John Adams, Presidental, booklet pane of 6

Color: rose carmine

2c John Adams plate proof

National Postal Museum
Certified plate proofs are the last printed proof of the plate before printing the stamps at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. These plate proofs are each unique, with the approval signatures and date. For postal scholars these plates provide important production information in the plate margin inscriptions, including guidelines, plate numbers, and initials of the siderographer, or person who created the plate from a transfer roll.

Plate No. 21891

Denomination: 2¢

Subject: John Adams, Presidential Issue

Color: rose carmine

Portrait of John Adams

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

6c John Quincy Adams single

National Postal Museum
mint; perf 11 x 10.5
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