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Joan Snyder interview excerpt - painting

Archives of American Art
In the course of a life, there is often one teacher who changes everything. For painter Joan Snyder, that teacher was Billy Pritchard. Snyder was on the path to becoming a social worker when she took an art elective with Pritchard in her senior year at Rutgers. In this excerpt from an oral history interview conducted in 2010 for the Archives of American Art and funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, Snyder talks about her shift from social work to painting and renting her first studio in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 1962.

Carmen Lomas Garza interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
In an interview with Paul Karlstrom, Carmen Lomas Garza discusses how she made two major life altering decisions at the age of thirteen. Watching her mother paint loteria tablas and monito still-life drawings in her Kingsville, Texas home, Lomas Garza decided to sacrifice the prospects of a family life in order to commit herself to the arts.

Selena interview, 1994

National Museum of American History
RARE Selena video, not seen in more than 20 years was found and digitized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. This footage of Selena on the program “Tejano USA” was found in a TV camera donated to the museum’s Spanish-language television project by Univision, the parent company of San Antonio’s KWEX-TV, Channel 41. The station’s production manager put an unlabeled ¾ inch tape in the camera to show what format that camera used. When the museum digitized the video this summer, the Selena footage was discovered. The production manager, who actually directed the segment with Selena, tells the museum that after Selena passed away in 1995, he had looked everywhere for the video with no luck. The video resurfaced just as the museum planned to open a display on Hispanic Advertising that includes the Tejana artists’ work as a spokesperson for Coca-Cola. The video was taken at Hemisfair Park, San Antonio Texas, April 1994 just before Selena performed at the “Texas Live” Music Festival sponsored by Coca Cola.

Garment interview statement

National Museum of American History

Francesca Dominguez Interview [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

George Leslie Stout interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
George Leslie Stout (1897-1978) was a museum director and prominent art conservator in Massachusetts. Stout was one of the first U.S. soldiers to be assigned to the MFAA Section and played a prominent role in the recovery of art work stolen by the Nazis. He was appointed Lieutenant Commander of the MFAA unit and supervised the inventorying and removal of looted artwork hidden in the salt mines of Merkers and Ransbach in Thuringia, Germany and in other repositories in France and the Netherlands. In this audio clip Stout speaks of his experience as a MFAA officer, especially the poor storage conditions in the salt mines.

S. Lane Faison interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Samson Lane Faison Jr. (1907-2006) was an art history professor at Williams College, Massachusetts. During World War II, Faison enlisted and served in the Naval Air Force. From 1945 to 1946, Faison was a member of the Office of Strategic Services Art Looting Investigation Unit (ALIU), finding and recovering art stolen by the Nazis. In this audio clip, Faison discusses his exploits as a Monuments Men, starting with the phone call asking him to join the ALIU and later working as the director of the Munich Central Collecting Point, one of several locations established by the U.S. State Department to gather the recovered art for repatriation.

Otto Wittmann 1981 interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Otto Wittmann (1911-2001) was a curator and director of the Toledo Museum of Art from 1959-1976. During World War II, Wittmann served as a Major with the Air Force but was later transferred to the Art Looting Investigation Unit (ALIU) in Washington, D.C. under the Office of Strategic Services. As an ALIU official, Wittmann assisted with looted art recovery in Paris and Munich, investigated transactions in Sweden and Switzerland, and worked with the collection centers in France. In this excerpt, Wittmann talks about his work restituting art looted by the Nazis.

Otto Wittmann 1976 interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Otto Wittmann (1911-2001) was a curator and director of the Toledo Museum of Art from 1959-1976. During World War II, Wittmann served as a Major with the Air Force but was later transferred to the Art Looting Investigation Unit (ALIU) in Washington, D.C. under the Office of Strategic Services. As an ALIU official, Wittmann assisted with looted art recovery in Paris and Munich, investigated transactions in Sweden and Switzerland, and worked with the collection centers in France. In this excerpt, Wittmann talks about his work restituting art looted by the Nazis.

Stanton L. Catlin interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Stanton L. Catlin (1915-1997) was assistant director of Yale University Art Gallery and later the gallery director and professor at Syracuse University. Before the World War II, Catlin was introduced to Rose Valland, who was the assistant to the director of the Jeu de Paume Museum. During World War II, Valland spied on the Nazis who used the Jeu de Paume Museum as a storage location for looted art before transporting the artwork by train to various German repositories scattered throughout Germany and Austria. In this audio excerpt, Catlin talks about Valland's contributions to the recovery of artwork plundered by the Nazis.

Thomas Carr Howe interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Thomas Carr Howe (1904-1994) was the director of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco for nearly four decades. During World War II, Howe enlisted and was a U.S. Naval Lieutenant before being assigned to the MFAA Section, serving from 1945 to 1946 in Germany and Austria. In this audio clip, Howe talks about locating large caches of art work that had been looted by the Nazis in the salt mines and the postwar restitution efforts and returning the artwork to their countries of origin.

Andrew Carnduff Ritchie interview excerpt

Archives of American Art
Andrew Carnduff Ritchie (1907-1978) was an art administrator and art historian. He was a research assistant and lecturer at the Frick Collection, then the director of the Albright Art Gallery in New York from 1942. After World War II, Ritchie served as a MFAA advisor at the Munich Central Collecting Point where he supervised the restitution of artwork, notably Vermeer's The Art of Painting, which was owned by the Czernin family up until the war. In this audio clip, Ritchie talks about the highlights of his MFAA experiences, especially the fate of the "Czernin Vermeer" and his experience transporting the Imperial Regalia of the Holy Roman Empire from Nuremberg to Vienna.

Interview with Diane Thram

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Spring 2014: South Africa

Interview With Nati Cano

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
In April of 2014, Daniel Sheehy, director and curator of Smithsonian Folkways sat down with GRAMMY Award-winning, mariachi pioneer Natividad "Nati" Cano. Natividad "Nati" Cano Passed away on October 3, 2014 during the production of Mariachi Los Camperos de Nati Cano’s Tradición, Arte y Pasión.

Interview with Casey Anderson

Smithsonian Channel
Take a look at our interview with wildlife filmmaker Casey Anderson, creator of The Mountain Lion & Me on Smithsonian Channel (premiering March 14) and Casey Anderson's Wild Tracks on Smithsonian Earth (streaming March 26). We talked to Casey about his work and how he prepares for intense filming trips in the wilderness of Yellowstone. The Mountain Lion and Me http://bit.ly/2oBcIrc Casey Anderson's Wild Tracks http://bit.ly/2F3GlZi

Henry Jacobs: An interview

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Fall/Winter 2012: Sounds and Soundscapes

Rachel Ciampoli NMAAHC Interview

Smithsonian Institution
NMAAHC Intern, Rachel Ciampoli discusses her recent projects! Sound: Bensound

Exit Interview: Luke Biondi

Smithsonian Institution
OFI intern Luke Biondi reflecting on his last day at Smithsonian.

Interview with Clare Bushman

Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Intern Clare Bushman describes her experience as a returning intern.

Interview with Marcia Marcus

Archives of American Art
2 sound cassettes : analog ; 1 hr., 28 min., 25 sec. Interview with Marcia Marcus conducted by Dorothy Gee Seckler in Provincetown, Massachusetts, August 28, 1967. Marcus discusses her early life and studies in New York at New York University and Cooper Union, her self-portraits and figurative paintings, Abstract Expressionism, and her artistic influences.
Jean Cohen interview found on cassette 2 of 2, side 2 of the Marcia Marcus interview, and is cataloged separately as Digital Item ID#13818.

Interview with Jean Cohen

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette : analog ; 32 min., 22 sec. Interview with Jean Cohen conducted by Dorothy Gees Seckler at the Dunes near Provincetown, Massachusetts, August 24, 1967. Cohen discusses her artistic influences, including Abstract Expressionism, and her paintings.
Jean Cohen interview is found on cassette 2 of 2, side 2 of the Marcia Marcus interview, which is cataloged separately as Digital Item ID#13819.

Interview with Elise Asher

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette : analog ; 58 min., 50 sec.

Interview with Elise Asher conducted by Dorothy Gees Seckler on August 17, 1976. Asher discusses Robert Motherwell, Franz Kline, Jackson Pollock, and Nanno de Groot, as well as other artists of the Provincetown, Massachusetts art community and her circle in New York.

Interview with Olin Orr

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette : analog ; 1 hr., 52 sec. Interview with Olin Orr conducted by Dorothy Gees Seckler, August 4, 1968.Orr discusses his work for an exhibition at the Provincetown Art Museum, his paper bag work in general, and his artistic education.
Side 1 of the cassette contains only 2 minutes recording Seckler testing the tape recorder, unrelated to the Orr interview. The last 20 minutes of side 2 has a very low sound level.

Interview with Helen Frankenthaler

Archives of American Art
1 sound tape reel : analog ; 5 in. ; 13 min., 46 sec. This interview was made during research for an article for Art in America entitled "The artist in America: victim of the culture boom?"
Electronic hum in the original recording interrupts this recording intermittently.
Found on tape with Interview with Robert Motherwell cataloged separately as Digital ID #12874.
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