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Found 7,571 Resources

Bowl, Fox

National Museum of American History

Charles Fox

National Museum of American History

Br'er Fox

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Fox II

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Fox and Geese Game Board

National Museum of American History
This 9-inch square board with 32 holes was made for playing Fox and Geese, a game of strategy between two players. The 19 pegs representing geese and a single longer peg for the fox are long gone from this particular board made in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Fox and Geese was among the games played by fishermen during idle times on sailing schooners working in the North Atlantic fisheries. This board was part of a display on “Habits of Fishermen,” at the International Fisheries Exhibition in London in 1883. Other games in the display, all from Gloucester, included cards, a checkerboard, backgammon, and a diamond puzzle. The rules of play for Fox and Geese are simple: one player controls the fox, while the other controls the geese. The fox can move in a straight line in any direction and, as it jumps over geese, the geese are removed from the board. To win, the fox must break through the entire line of geese. The geese are only allowed to move forward or sideways. To win, they must corner the fox so it cannot move. The Oxford English Dictionary cites a 1633 reference to the game from a play called Fine Companion by Shackerley Marmion: “Let him sit in the shop . . . and let him play at fox and geese with the foreman.” The game was played in colonial America and, with minor variations, well into the 19th and 20th centuries. This game board was one of several items donated to the Smithsonian by Capt. George Merchant Jr., of Gloucester.

Fox kachina

National Museum of the American Indian

Fox fetish

National Museum of the American Indian

Fox figure

National Museum of the American Indian

Fox fetish

National Museum of the American Indian

Charlie Fox

National Museum of American History

Charlie Fox

National Museum of American History

Fox Food

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Fox Skin

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Carvings, Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox Trap

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CONDITION REPORT FOR HALL 9 TAKEDOWN (C. VALENTOUR 3/98): "LARGE BONE FITTED W/ WOODEN PADDLE (PROP?) W/ 3 CARVED IVORY SPIKES (PROP?). PADDLE LASHED W/ BRAIDED SINEWS TO 2 BONE HANDLES. RAWHIDE LURE LASH ATTACHED TO PADDLE."

From card: "Consists of 1' x 5 1/2" piece of bone with marrow cavity cleaned out, and a bone toggle at each end fastened to cord running through to hold the center piece of wood, 1'5" L., studded with 3 sharp ivory prongs, and a heavy flat spatula shaped piece of wood, onto which the prongs fall. Bought from Eskimos at Gambell, St. Lawrence Island."

Source of the information below: Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska Native Collections: Sharing Knowledge website, by Aron Crowell, entry on this artifact https://alaska.si.edu/record.asp?id=350 , retrieved 7-31-2018; see web page for additional information: Fox trap. Siberia and northern Alaska by the Russians.(1) In Alaska, they were used on St. Lawrence Island and along the mainland shore from Norton Sound to Kotzebue Sound.(2) By the late 1800s, the traditional traps had been replaced by steel ones in most places. In 1940, James Ottiahok of St. Lawrence Island described how the old traps were used by his father's generation: "Not many people were hunting foxes and there were very few traps. At that time they all used old-time traps. They would take a whale rib and drill a hole through it. In the center of the hole they would put a piece of wood attached to strong sinew, and there would be a wooden plate in the middle. The sinew was then twisted very, very tight so that it would make the wood hit the plate very hard. They put a little piece of meat on the plate. The fox would eat the meat and bite the sinew and get hit right in the mouth."(3) The traps were fastened firmly to the ground and covered with earth or snow to make them harder to see. The buried traps could be dangerous, and trappers were sometimes struck in the foot if they accidentally stepped on the hidden bait or trigger.(4) 1. Bogoras 1904-09:138 2. Nelson 1899:122-123 3. Krupnik et al. 2002:159 4. Bogoras 1904-09:138-139; Nelson 1899:123.

White Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "HEAD TURNED TO LEFT. BACK MARKED WITH LINE DOWN SPINE WITH LINES RADIATING FROM THAT. RIGHT FRONT AND BACK LEFT LEGS MISSING. INVENTORIED 1979."

Ivory Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Bone Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "CRUDELY CARVED, INCISED LINES ON BACK. PROFILE. INVENTORIED 1979."

Carving, Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "INVENTORIED 1978."

John Fox Potter

National Portrait Gallery

Fox Trap

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.

Fox-Trap

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
What is transcribed as "Mara Tbashi" on the catalogue card, and listed as the culture, may also be read as Mara Ibashi or Maralbashi in the ledger book. This may perhaps be the town of Maralbashi, rather than a culture name? - F. Pickering 7-20-2008

Toy Fox

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
FROM CARD: "INVENTORIED 1978."

Fox Trap

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
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