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Found 12,798 Resources

knife, dessert

National Museum of American History
Dessert knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip. Blade and “yankee” style bolster are one piece of steel with tang fitted into tapered ivory handle with rounded sides and butt. Tang is held in place with a steel pin through the side. Metal has dark spots. Ivory is yellowed and crazed.

Blade is stamped: “LAMSON GOODNOW & CO/S. FALLS”

Maker is Lamson & Goodnow Company, a manufacturer and wholesaler active in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts 1844-present.

knife, dessert

National Museum of American History
Dessert knife. Straight steel blade with rounded tip and squared bolster. Blade, bolster, and tang are one piece of steel fitted into a wooden tapered block handle with straight sides and a rounded butt. Tang is held in place with a brass pin. Metal has scratches and minor discoloration. Wood has small crack on underside near bolster. Brass is corroded.

Blade is stamped: “SOUTH RIVER CUTLERY Co/CONWAY MASS”

Maker is the South River Cutlery Company, in business 1851-1858 in Conway, Massachusetts.

knife, carving; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Carving knife, with matching fork (1986.531.234). Straight steel blade with pointed drop point tip. Blade and bolster are one piece of steel with the tang fitted into a teardrop-shaped white hard rubber handle. Metal is heavily scratched, corroded. Handle is scratched and discolored.

Blade is etched: “J. RUSSELL & CO/[Illegible and faded]” within double diamond.

Matching fork is etched on underside of stand: “PAT. JULY 13. 1880”

Patent:

US229802 A, July 13, 1880, Calvin L. Butler, Greenfield, Massachusetts, assignor to John Russell Cutlery Company, Turner Falls, Massachusetts, for “Carving-fork”

Maker is John Russell & Company, Turner Falls, Massachusetts, 1834-present.

knee cord, pair

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
A is long strand holding 48 tiny predominantly yellow and red bead pendants, with deer hoof tips and parrot feathers. Each end has a 4-strand bead and feather decoration. B fits same description, except cord has 46 pendants attached. Dr. Newton says that these were obtained from Jardelina Tamgogti, a 45 y/o female, and made by Kuprukin, the deceased madrinha of Panbu. Used, made for Panbu Maria, a 20 y/o female. Made for the ceremony meo krem pumblunti. The knee cord and pedants are mekai. Cord is square cordage (cross section) made from a single strand (crochet). One end has glass beads, feathers and on other end, pendants. Long cord is 2z cotton. Bead and pendant string is 2z tucum/caroa. Pendants are glass beads, black and white antique glass beads, deer nails/hoofs, feather, parrot and macaw. Price paid: 5 crn. Associated specimens: purchased with a combined knee cord and pendants, field number 1968-120 a + b.

1968 121a: Red-and-Green Macaw, Ara chloroptera,(small red body feathers); Yellow-headed Parrot, Amazona ochrocephala (many multicolor flight feathers); Orange-winged Parrot, Amazona amazonica (many multicolor flight feathers); 1968 121b: Red-and-Green Macaw, Ara chloroptera (red tufts at end pieces); Yellow-headed Parrot, Amazona ochrocephala (many red/green/yellow mixed tail & wing feathers; A. ochrocephala red oval near rachis); Orange-winged Parrot, Amazona amazonica (many red/green/yellow mixed tail feathers; A. amazonica >orange).

iron, wafer

National Museum of American History
Circular wafer iron, plier form; both plates feature an incuse musical trophy design composed of a lyre at center on an open music book, surrounded by pairs of tympani and cymbals, five trumpets, and two flags, all inside a laurel wreath border. Two, long, tapered handles have rectangular shafts, cylindrical grips, and ball-and-acorn terminals; the tip of one is hammered into a hook holding a shaped locking ring that fits over the other handle to secure closed. Both handles have small arrow-shaped pads double-riveted to plates. No marks.

According to the accession file, the donor was apparently related to early Dutch settlers in New York and this wafer iron and waffle iron, DL*59.2205-.2206 are catalogued as having been "brought from Holland by early New York Dutch." The catalog card dates this wafer iron to "second quarter 18th century". Date seems early; further research needed.

husker, corn

National Museum of American History
Wrought iron corn husker or husking pin. The pointed end is inserted under the husk of corn at its top and pulled down until all the husk was removed. Narrow and flat piece of metal, tapered to a point on one end, bent over on the opposite end, to fit around the user’s fingers. Four circular holes through the shaft, with a black leather strap tied through, to maintain a solid grip. No mark. Leather is cracked, shows wear.

fork; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Fork, part of a picnic set with matching knife (1986.0531.062A). Short three-tined fork with flat baluster stem. Tines, stem, and tang are one piece of steel fitted with pewter bolster into a wooden handle with rounded sides and blunt butt. Handle is comprised of two pieces of wood riveted to tang with brass pins. When placed facing one another, knife and fork fit together. Metal is scratched and stained overall, minor rust, nicks in bolster. Wood is separating towards butt. No mark.

Blade of matching knife is etched: “UNIVERSAL/L.F.&C.”

Maker is Landers, Frary & Clark, New Britain, Connecticut (c. 1862). In 1890, L. F. & C. took on the Trademark “Universal”, in 1965, General Electric acquired the company. The company began using the abbreviation “L.F.& C.” in 1898, this mark is dated 1912.

fork, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner fork with a matching dinner knife (see 1986.0531.015). Two-tined with a baluster stem. Tines, stem, and bolster are one piece of steel. Handle has slight curve. Bone scales are riveted to the top and bottom of the tang with steel pins to form a rounded handle with a blunt butt fitted with a round iron pommel cap. A cross-hatched diamond pattern is inscribed into the bone. Overall scratches and discoloration, metal has rust spots, nicks. Bone is chipped. No mark.

Blade of matching knife is stamped: “SANDERSON”

Maker is possibly the Sanderson Brothers (formerly Naylor & Sanderson), active in Sheffield, England ca 1829-present.

fork, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner fork, one of two with matching dinner knives (1986.0531.043-.46). Three-tined with a chamfered baluster stem. Tines and stem are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered block horn handle with chamfered edges and blunt butt. Tang is held in handle with one brass pin, with round horn peg at butt. Blade is heavily discolored with some spots of rust. Horn is cracked and chipped near bolster. No mark.

Blades of accompanying knives are stamped: “L . BOOTH/NORFOLK ST WORKS/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is possibly L[uke] Booth, active in Sheffield, England in the early 19th century until his death in 1855.

fork, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner fork, with accompanying “One-armed man’s” knife (1986.531.225A), in original box (1986.531.225C). Long, four-tined fork with chamfered baluster stem. Tines and stem are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered ivory handle with straight sides, chamfered edges, and rounded butt. Minor rust and discoloration on metal. Ivory is yellowed, with long crack down back side near bolster. No mark.

Blades of accompanying knife are stamped: “W[crown]R/RODGERS CUTLERS/TO THEIR MAJESTIES”; partially worn away.

Maker is Rodgers Cutlers, Sheffield, England, founded circa 1724. From 1971-1977 the firm operated under the name Rodgers-Wostenholm, and in 1977 Imperial of Providence, Rhode Island purchased the company.

fork, dinner; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Dinner fork, one of two with matching dinner knives (1986.0531.043-.46). Three-tined with a chamfered baluster stem. Tines and stem are one piece of steel fitted into a tapered block horn handle with chamfered edges and blunt butt. Tang is held in handle with one brass pin, with round horn peg at butt. Metal is heavily discolored with some spots of rust. Horn is cracked near bolster. No mark.

Blades of accompanying knives are stamped: “L . BOOTH/NORFOLK ST WORKS/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is possibly L[uke] Booth, active in Sheffield, England in the early 19th century until his death in 1855.

fork, carving; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Large two-tined carving fork, one of a two piece carving set with matching dinner knife and fork (1986.0531.039-.42). Baluster stem with hinged kick stand which allows the fork to rest in place on a serving dish. Tines, stem, and tang are one piece of steel fitted into a squared block ivory handle with blunt butt. Scratched and stained steel, ivory is yellowed with large crack down one side. No mark.

Blade of accompanying carving knife is stamped: “W&S BUTCHER/SHEFFIELD”

Maker is W[illiam] & S[amuel] Butcher, active ca 1819-1947 in Sheffield, England.

fork, carving; cutlery, set, part of

National Museum of American History
Carving fork, with matching knife (1986.531.233). Two-tined with tapered baluster stem and “yankee” style bolster. A hinged lyre-shaped stand is attached to the underside of the stem. Tines, stem, and bolster are one piece of chrome-plated steel with the tang fitted into a teardrop-shaped white hard rubber handle. Metal is heavily discolored, minor rust. Handle is scratched and discolored.

Matching fork is etched on underside of stand: “PAT. JULY 13. 1880”

Blade of matching knife is etched: “J. RUSSELL & CO/[Illegible and faded]” within double diamond.

Patent:

US229802 A, July 13, 1880, Calvin L. Butler, Greenfield, Massachusetts, assignor to John Russell Cutlery Company, Turner Falls, Massachusetts, for “Carving-fork”

Maker is John Russell & Company, Turner Falls, Massachusetts, 1834-present.

eroRutan Quickie

National Air and Space Museum
Single engine, single seat, stagger wing, 16ft. 8in. span, 17ft. 4in. long, 4ft. high; white with blue trim.

In 1974, Tom Jewett and Gene Sheehan decided to begin designing an airplane that would provide "more flying enjoyment for less money" than other homebuilt aircraft designs popular at that time. Burt Rutan (Rutan VariEze and Voyager, see NASM collection) assisted Jewett and Sheehan in the design work and the first Quickie was finished, tested in flight, and ready for a public introduction by April 1978. In June, the two men formed the Quickie Aircraft Corporation to produce and sell complete kits to build the aircraft. They flew the airplane to the Experimental Aircraft Association's annual gathering at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in June where the Quickie drew intense public interest and won the Outstanding New Design award. By 1980, the firm had sold 350 kits.

The Quickie is a single-place, single-engined aircraft fitted with a canard approximately equal in area to the main wing. The layout almost qualifies the aircraft as a biplane with tremendous negative stagger between the upper and lower wings. Construction methods remain identical to other Rutan designs. A builder cuts foam cores for the various components and covers them with resin and fiberglass cloth. Rutan envisioned powering the Quickie with an Onan industrial generator engine that developed 22 horsepower but many builders found this motor too weak. A 2-place version, propelled by a 64 horsepower engine and called the Q-2, was also developed. The Q-200, equipped with a modified lower wing and powered by an 85 horsepower engine, also flew. Various organizations sold Approximately 1,000 Quickie kits and 2,000 Q-2 and Q-200 kits.

In 1974, Tom Jewett and Gene Sheehan decided to begin designing an airplane that would provide "more flying enjoyment for less money" than other homebuilt aircraft designs popular at that time. Burt Rutan (Rutan VariEze and Voyager, see NASM collection) assisted Jewett and Sheehan in the design work and the first Quickie was finished, tested in flight, and ready for a public introduction by April 1978. In June, the two men formed the Quickie Aircraft Corporation to produce and sell complete kits to build the aircraft. They flew the airplane to the Experimental Aircraft Association's annual gathering at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in June where the Quickie drew intense public interest and won the Outstanding New Design award. By 1980, the firm had sold 350 kits.

The Quickie is a single-place, single-engined aircraft fitted with a canard approximately equal in area to the main wing. The layout almost qualifies the aircraft as a biplane with tremendous negative stagger between the upper and lower wings. Construction methods remain identical to other Rutan designs. A builder cuts foam cores for the various components and covers them with resin and fiberglass cloth. Rutan envisioned powering the Quickie with an Onan industrial generator engine that developed 22 horsepower but many builders found this motor too weak. A 2-place version, propelled by a 64 horsepower engine and called the Q-2, was also developed. The Q-200, equipped with a modified lower wing and powered by an 85 horsepower engine, also flew. Various organizations sold Approximately 1,000 Quickie kits and 2,000 Q-2 and Q-200 kits. Mr. C. M. Cunningham donated his Quickie to the National Air and Space Museum in 1983.

environment

National Museum of American History
The word "environment" printed in white on a green background.

eDNA emerges as powerful tool for tracking threatened river herring in Chesapeake Bay

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Article contributed by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science  Using environmental DNA (eDNA) to track the presence of fish in waterways is emerging as a powerful tool to detect and understand the abundance of species in aquatic environments. However, relatively few studies have compared the performance of this emerging technology to traditional […]

The post eDNA emerges as powerful tool for tracking threatened river herring in Chesapeake Bay appeared first on Shorelines.

e.e. cummings Self-Portrait

National Portrait Gallery
Poet E. E. Cummings, who famously avoided uppercase letters in his writings, declared that "poetry and every other art was and is and forever will be strictly and distinctly a question of individuality." Believing that poetry was visual as well as verbal, Cummings defied rules of punctuation, capitalization, and arrangement of words on the page in his poems of the 1920s and 1930s, offering a new literary experience for Americans. For some, he demonstrated the rich possibilities for self-expression; others he left feeling uncomfortable and annoyed. In either case, his radicalism made an indelible mark on twentieth-century letters and, in the words of one critic, extended "the capabilities of poetry" well beyond its traditional limits. As this self-portrait indicates, Cummings was also a competent painter. After serving in World War I, he studied painting in Paris and exhibited his work in New York.

chartometer

National Museum of American History
A chartometer measured distances on maps and charts. Edward Russell Morris, a draftsman in the Small Arms Factory in Birmingham, England, obtained a British patent (#3948) on the form in 1873. He called it an “improved pocket instrument for measuring and recording distances.” This example belonged to Spencer Fullerton Baird, the naturalist who served as the second Secretary of the Smithsonian. The case is marked “CHARTOMETER / MORRIS’S PATENT.” The glass cover opens to allow different paper scales to be fitted to the face. Ref: Notice in The London Gazette (Dec. 12, 1873). “The Chartometer,” The Gardner’s Chronicle and Agricultural Gazette (May 24, 1873): 718-719.

boll weevil killer

National Museum of American History
The Cole Manufacturing Company produced a boll weevil killer in the early twentieth century to combat the pest that plagued cotton crops throughout the American South. This particular weevil killer was found in a hardware store in Rutledge, Georgia, and is listed in a 1940 Cole catalogue for $16. Still in its original shipping crate, It was purchased from Pam Jones, proprietor of the Rutledge Hardware Store in 1998 for $5000.

The weevil killer measures 50”x 34”x 17” and was designed as an attachment for the Cole Cotton Planter. The machine consists of rotating mops, which ran on ground power and applied a mixture of 1 gallon of molasses, 1 gallon of water, and 1pound of Calcium Arsenate to the cotton plants. The molasses attracted the weevils, while the arsenic acted as a pesticide.

The weevil killer represents two key issues that farmers in the early twentieth century faced on a daily basis: pests that plagued their crops and the toxic pesticides used to kill them. It not only reminds us of the hard work and ingenuity involved in producing a profitable crop, but also of the hazards involved to both the farmer and the environment.

blanket

National Museum of American History
Blanket

Ca. 1850

The step diamond pattern in the center indicates a Saltillo style serape or poncho popular and common from New Mexico to Guatemala. Thousands of head of sheep were brought in with the Spanish colonization and were well suited to the environment. Wool manufacture become an important part of the local economy. Local Indians already created weavings made from cotton and other plant products. The Spanish incorporated wool manufacturing techniques and encouraged the Indians to do more weaving. The industry died off when new trade brought in cotton cloth, but was revived again when the railroads brought in the tourist trade.

baren

National Museum of American History
Barens used for rubbing the back of the paper against the inked block in Japanese printmaking. See illustrations GA.03209.03-.04. A baren is made of four parts. A stiff disk formed of paper layers pasted together is turned up at the edge to form a shallow receptacle. It is covered with cotton cloth. A second disk of twisted cord fits into this receptacle and is held in place by a bamboo sheath drawn tightly over it and twisted together on the back to form a handle wrapped with additional paper. See illustrations GA.05028-29 diagramming the method of printing with the baren. One baren is divided into its constituent parts; there are several barens registered under this number.

banner

National Museum of American History

[Tsuba, saya zuanshū = Sketchbook of designs for sword guards and sword fittings]

Smithsonian Libraries
Manuscript.

Original cover missing.

English parallel title provided by the book dealer.

[Kingston]

National Museum of American History
A black and white print of a jockey sitting in a saddle of a dark horse with a braided mane and clipped tail. The jockey wears close fitting pants, which button at the knees, high boots, a button-up jacket, and a cap. The track is bound by a rail fence.

Kingston was bred by James R. Keene on the Castleton Stud Farm in Lexington, Kentucky in 1884. His sire was Spendthrift and his dam was Kapanga. Evert Snedecker purchased the horse when he was a yearling and raced him as a two-year old when he raced and defeated Hanover. In 1887 he was bought by the Dwyer brothers, Phil and Mike, for $12,500 because they were already in possession Hanover and hoped to prevent further competitions between the two stallions. Kingston’s training was taken over by Frank McCabe and raced until he was 10, long past the age of retirement. In total, Kingston won 89 races, the most of any thoroughbred in the history of racing, and amounted $140,195 in purse money. Immediately after going to stud, Kingston became the Leading Sire in America in 1900 and 1910. He died on December 6, 1912 and was one of the first horses inducted into the Racing Hall of Fame in 1955.
73-96 of 12,798 Resources