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yo: A Man Meets a Former Sweetheart, Now Serving in a Provincial Household

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

working drawing,tea sets

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Each shows the teapot with the handle at right, on top, the cream pot with the

handle at left, bottom left, the two-handled and covered sugar bowl, bottom

right. The handles of the cream pots and augar bowls are forked on top.

Reverse: blackened for tracing. The knobs of the covers are shaped like urns.

Rough sketch of a pendant(?) top right. Marked, ink,"#38.• Written, bottom

left: "Tracing, "pencil

working drawing,tea sets

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Each shows the teapot with the handle at right, on top, the cream pot with the

handle at left, bottom left, the two-handled and covered sugar bowl, bottom

right. The handles of the cream pots and augar bowls are forked on top.

Reverse: blackened for tracing. C: Top: the tea pot; the handle is at right. Urn on top

of the corner. Bottom left; the cream pot; the sharply rising apout is at

left. Bottom right: two-handled sugar bowl without a cover. "#37"

Tracing, bottom right. Reverse: blackened for tracing.

working drawing,tea sets

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Each shows the teapot with the handle at right, on top, the cream pot with the

handle at left, bottom left, the two-handled and covered sugar bowl, bottom

right. The handles of the cream pots and augar bowls are forked on top.

Reverse: blackened for tracing. More richly decorated ,·with mouldings and yegetable motif. "42" aaA.

wood Stove and Axe [painting] / (photographed by Walter Rosenblum)

Archives and Special Collections, Smithsonian American Art Museum
Title supplied by cataloger.

1 photographic print : b&w, 8 x 10 in.

1 negative ; 4 x 5 in.

wining Cedar (3 of 15): Teachings from Tsimshian Master Weaver Lillian Buchert

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska
Red cedar bark twined basketry is a distinctive Tsimshian art form. With the passing on of elder master artists and the demands of contemporary lifestyles, it became at risk. A handful of weavers today are working to master and revitalize twined cedarbark basketry, reconnecting with a proud heritage. In 2016, the Arctic Studies Center collaborated with The Haayk Foundation of Metlakatla to document the materials and techniques of cedarbark basketry. The project included a harvesting and processing workshop and a weaving workshop in Metlakatla, and a residency at the Arctic Studies Center in Anchorage where artists studied baskets from museum and private collections, practiced and refined weaving techniques, and taught museum visitors and school children about basketry. Teaching was led by Haida master weaver Delores Churchill, who learned from master Tsimshian weaver Flora Mather, with assistance from her daughter Holly Churchill, an accomplished weaver. In addition to Metlakatla students, three advanced Tsimshian weavers participated in the project, sharing techniques learned in their families and communities and learning new ones: Kandi McGilton (co-founder of The Haayk Foundation), Karla Booth (granddaughter of Tsimshian master weaver Violet Booth) and Annette Topham (niece of master Tsimshian weaver Lillian Buchert). Metlakatla elder Sarah Booth, a fluent speaker of Sm’algyax (Ts’msyen), assisted Kandi McGilton in documenting indigenous basketry terminology for use in language classes. The videos presented here, with footage from the workshops and residency, provide instruction on how to harvest and process materials and on how to weave a basket from start to finish. To learn more about Tsimshian culture, please visit the website Sharing Knowledge at /http://alaska.si.edu, where you will find information about all Alaska Native cultures and educational materials in the Resources section.

wildebeast in field

National Museum of American History

wig

National Museum of American History

wig

National Museum of American History

whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir

Smithsonian American Art Museum
The core of the Rufus Corporation’s “expedition to unravel utopian promise” would become this digital cinema installation whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoic. It is an experimental film composed from two screens: one reflecting the “movie” and one depicting the computer program behind the movie. In making the film, the collective traveled between Moscow and the Caspian Sea, compiling a cinematic record of the landscape, environment, and architecture while filming in local cafes, apartment blocks, and industrial plants. An audio/visual library comprised of 3,000 film clips, 80 voice-overs, and 150 pieces of music forms the basis of an improvised film noir.

A non-linear narrative unfolds through the observations and surveillance of the central protagonist, Holz, who finds himself living in a dystopian futuropolis. Further provoking cinematic form, the film’s presentation is edited in real time by a custom-programmed computer that Sussman has labeled the “serendipity machine.” The artwork is driven by key words that appear on the secondary screen and delivers a changing narrative that runs indefinitely, never playing the same sequence twice. The unexpected juxtapositions of voice, image, and sound create a sense of unyielding suspense that continuously divorces the protagonist from the full course of his own narrative.

Watch This!: Revelations in Media Art, 2015

watercolor

National Museum of American History

watercolor

National Museum of American History

waterbuck at pool

National Museum of American History

vignettes showing U.S. Government buildings

National Museum of American History

view of Monterey

National Museum of American History

view of Lubec And Hamburg

National Museum of American History

vest

National Museum of American History

vb08.069.vb

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

vase and flowers with reflection

National Museum of American History

untitled (to Helga and Carlo, with respect and affection)

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

untitled

National Museum of American History
This engraved wood block was used to print an image in the publication "Narrative of the U.S. Exploring Expedition, During the Years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, Zoophytes," 1846, Volume 7, page 21. The image was likely drawn by Charles Pickering. It was engraved by an unknown artist, and originally printed by C. Sherman of Philadelphia in 1846.

unfinished sketch

National Museum of American History

unfinished sketch

National Museum of American History

unfinished sketch

National Museum of American History
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