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American Art Meets Desperate Housewives

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Cory Arcangel and Media Arts at American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Surf's Up at American Art!

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailThe dog days of summer and the beach beckons but can't get out of town? Well, American Art can help with that.

"Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) is regarded today as one of the most important American artists of the twentieth century. A black man born into slavery in Alabama, he was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. Traylor would not live to see the civil rights movement, but he was among those who laid its foundation. Starting around 1939—by then in his late eighties and living on the streets of Montgomery—Traylor made the radical steps of taking up pencil and paintbrush and attesting to his existence and point of view. The paintings and drawings he made are visually striking and politically assertive; they include simple yet powerful distillations of tales and memories as well as spare, vibrantly colored abstractions. When Traylor died in 1949, he left behind more than one thousand works of art.

Open Now: African American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailOur latest exhibition, African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond, opens today and runs through September 30, 2012. The show features a selection of paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs by black artists from the museum's collection.

Throwback Thursday: Art Critic Adam Gopnik on What Makes American Art American

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailDuring this election season, Americans have been debating what it means to be American. So, it's fitting to consider what is American about American art. In October 2012, Adam Gopnik, writer for The New Yorker, spoke about this as part of SAAM's Clarice Smith Lecture series.

Episode 7 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Sophie Rivera

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at two untitled photographs by Sophie Rivera http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80106 http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80107 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 3 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Teresita Fernández

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the work "Nocturnal (Horizon Line)" by Teresita Fernández. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=84452 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 1 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Melesio Casas

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the painting "Humanscape 62" by Melesio Casas. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=84441 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 5 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Frank Romero

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the painting "Death of Rubén Salazar" by Frank Romero. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=33584 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 2 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Carmen Herrera

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the painting "Blanco y Verde" by Carmen Herrera. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=80437 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 4 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Jesús Moroles

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the sculpture "Granite Weaving" by Jesús Moroles. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=32248 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

Episode 6 - Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art - Christina Fernandez

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the series "Maria's Great Expedition" by Christina Fernandez. http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=86344 "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art" presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum's pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture. http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/

American Art in a Global Context: Photography as a Global Medium

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "American Art in a Global Context" Saturday, September 30, 2006 Session VI: Photography as a Global Medium Moderator: Anthony Lee, Mount Holyoke College Presenters: Nancy Mowll Mathews, Williams College Museum of Art, "American Moving Pictures in an International Context, 1890-1900" François Brunet, Université Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, "American Photography in France: A Brief History of Reception" Rob Kroes, University of Amsterdam, "The Family of Man Revisited" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

“Tiffany Chung: Vietnam, Past Is Prologue” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Artist Tiffany Chung probes the legacies of the Vietnam War and its aftermath through maps, videos, and paintings that highlight the voices and stories of former Vietnamese refugees.

JRA Distinguished Artist Talk with Richard Jolley and Tommie Rush - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Husband-and-wife artists Richard Jolley and Tommie Rush create intensely colored glass pieces. Jolley, globally known for figurative sculpture, and Rush, known for vessels, discuss their partnership in work and life.

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Saturday, October 17 - Session 6)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
3:15–5:00 p.m., Directions in Art History and the Place of American Art, panel discussion featuring session chairs and guest speakers Moderator: Jennifer Greenhill, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Southern California Johanne Lamoureux, Director of Research and Studies, Institut national d’histoire de l’art, and Professor of Art History, Université de Montréal “Mourning the Universal? France and the United States in the Context of Transnationalism” Claudia Mattos-Avolese, Professor of Art History, Universidade Estadual de Campinas “Towards an Inclusive Art History: Theory and Practice” Paul Chaat Smith, Associate Curator, Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian “Rolling Network Outage” Veerle Thielemans, European Academic Program Director, Terra Foundation for American Art “Finding a Common Ground: American Art History Seen from Abroad”

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Friday, October 16 - Session 2)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
1:30–3:30 p.m., Positions Chair: ShiPu Wang, Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Culture, University of California, Merced Jacqueline Francis, Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies, California College of the Arts “Critical Race Art History: A Proposal” Asma Naeem, Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings and Time-Based Media Art, Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery “Leaving Yourself Behind: The Problem of Displacement in American Art History” Rita Gonzalez, Curator of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art “‘This Is Not America’: Positions and Politics in the Curating and Collecting of Contemporary American Art” 3:30–4:00 p.m., Coffee Break

Exhibition talk: What is Latino about American Art? with curator E. Carmen Ramos

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Our America exhibition curator E. Carmen Ramos, examines how Latino artists working since the mid-20th century have participated in American art movements and re-calibrated key themes in American art. Friday, October 25, 2013, 6 - 8pm

Shifting Terrain: Mapping a Transnational American Art History (Friday, October 16 - Session 3)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
4:00–6:00 p.m., Transactions Chair: Alex J. Taylor, Terra Foundation Research Fellow in American Art, Tate Melody Barnett Deusner, Assistant Professor of Art History, Indiana University, Bloomington “Constructing the ‘Deadly Parallel’: Paintings, Politics, and the Comparative Eye in Turn-of-the-Century Clubland” Yuko Kikuchi, Reader in Art and Design History, University of the Arts London “Cold War Transnational Design: Russel Wright and ‘Asian Modern’” Jessica L. Horton, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Delaware “Oil, Sheepherding, and Outer Space: Contemporary American Indian Paintings in and around Iran, 1964–1966”

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 5 - Day 2 Opening Remarks by David Driskell

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Ruth Fine, Curator, National Gallery of Art, Washington (1972-2012), and Board Member, Terra Foundation for American Art David C. Driskell, Professor Emeritus of Art, University of Maryland, College Park

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 6 - Developing a Trans-African Aesthetic

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Kelly Quinn, Terra Foundation Project Manager for Scholarly and Educational Initiatives, Archives of American Art Jeffrey C. Stewart, Professor of Black Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara "From Transnational to Trans-African: The Circulation of Culture in the Work of Winold Reiss and Romare Bearden" Rebecca Keegan VanDiver, Senior Lecturer, Vanderbilt University "Routes to Roots: Loïs Mailou Jones's Engagement with Africa and the African Diaspora, 1938-70"

"Do Ho Suh: Almost Home" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Do Ho Suh’s immersive architectural installations—unexpectedly crafted with ethereal fabric—are spaces that are at once deeply familiar and profoundly alien. Suh is internationally renowned for his “fabric architecture” sculptures that explore the global nature of contemporary identity as well as memory, migration, and our ideas of home. The exhibition "Do Ho Suh: Almost Home" is organized by Sarah Newman, the James Dicke Curator of Contemporary Art. It is the latest in a series of projects at the Smithsonian American Art Museum that situates the art of the United States in a global context. Learn more at https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/suh

Keynote by Don H. Doyle for "Hybrid Republicanism: Italy and American Art, 1840-1918"

Smithsonian American Art Museum
"The Republican Experiment: America, Italy, and the Perils of Self-Government," keynote talk by Don H. Doyle, McCausland Professor of History, University of South Carolina and Director of ARENA, The Association for Research on Ethnicity and Nationalisms in America. The keynote was part of “Hybrid Republicanism: Italy and American Art, 1840-1918,” an international conference hosted by the Centro Studi Americani and the American Academy in Rome. Conference talks considered the shared notions of republicanism and tyranny that animated American and Italian politics and visual culture from the nineteenth through the early twentieth century.
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