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Found 6,948 Collections

 

Gold Mining

How did the California Gold Rush in 1848 impact, and continue to impact, Nevada? #TeachingInquiry

April Fellman
10
 

Easy PZ: The 3 Ys (Theme: Human Evolution)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "The 3 Ys" with a museum resource from the National Portrait Gallery to encourage learners to discern the significance of a topic in global, local, and personal contexts.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
14
 

Easy PZ: The 3 Ys (Theme: Environmental Issues)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "The 3 Ys" with a museum resource from the National Portrait Gallery to encourage learners to discern the significance of a topic in global, local, and personal contexts.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
13
 
 

Sink Float

OBJECTIVES:

  • Experiment with objects to see if they sink or float
  • Learn that boats float
  • Discuss how sometimes boats sink and learn the word shipwreck 
  • Look closely at the 3D model of the Philadelphia Gunboat (a boat which sunk and was then later brought to the surface and into the Natural History Museum)
  • Make ships out of aluminum foil and experiment to see how many pennies can go on the boat before it sinks
Meredith Osborne
22
 

PS2 5 Making a solenoid

Using an electric current to produce a magnetic field.  With thanks to Steve March and Washington International School

Chris Hunt
6
 

Water Refugees

#SmithStories

Allaye Touré
1
 

PS1 7 Conservation of Mass

Looking at an example that seems to defy the Law of Conservation of Mass--but it doesn't! Explaining what happens at the atomic level.  With thanks to Team Chemistry at Washington International School 

Chris Hunt
13
 

Early Years of the War

Thomas Gray
3
 

Riding on a Carousel

OBJECTIVES

  • Look carefully at a variety of carousel animals 
  • Identify the animals 
  • Compare and contrast the animals 
  • Talk about which animals people typically ride
  • Talk about real vs pretend
  • Create a model carousel
Meredith Osborne
26
 

PS3 5 Interactions between magnetic and electric fields

Investigating the combination of magnetic and electric fields with the inductive effect, a dynamo,an electric bell and more.  With many thanks to Tony Godwin and Washington International School

Chris Hunt
22
 

Viral Histories: Additional Educational Resources

How do we strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. 

For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

This collection contains additional resources for educators and caregivers to continue and deepen student learning on this topic.  Learn more at https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

#ViralHistories

National Museum of American History
30
 

Museum Hopping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Smithsonian Museums. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can see the museums and explore the collections.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

PS1 2 Investigating a Chemical Reaction

All the chemistry involved with the intriguing reaction occurring between aluminum and iodine: a synthesis reaction between a metal and a non-metal forming an ionic bond.  Discover more about these elements in the periodic table, their electron configurations (arrangements), and their properties.  With thanks to Margaret Hoeger and Washington International School

Chris Hunt
6
 

Japanese Incarceration

This playlist on Japanese Incarceration is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write an letter to demonstrate their learning.

National Museum of American History
50
 

digital story

#smithstories 

Hilary Nguyen
1
 

The Early Effects Of Printing

Here is a collection of images related to the printing press from the 17th and 18th Centuries. The assignment is to select the three images which are the most interesting to you, and write a paragraph about each. In your paragraphs, start by explaining: 1) why you picked the image, 2) how it relates to the development of the printed word, and 3) what it meant for people who were alive at the time.

For added challenge, have the students finish the assignment with an additional paragraph (or more) explaining how each of the images they selected involve ideas or developments that still have an effect on their lives today.

David Wallace
10
 

Pearly Whites

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring teeth. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about teeth as well as explore videos about animal teeth. Families can listen to read alouds and podcasts about teeth. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
25
 

Subject: Activism

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to activism, protests, marches, and reform movements. 

See the Learning Lab collection, Annie Appelfor additional photographs of the Occupy Protests and Disasters for refugees. For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords (subject): protest, march, anti-, pro-, activism, citizenship, reform, demonstration, marchers, political movement, political discontent, anti-war, Vietnam War, Occupy Protest, Occupy Movement, women's vote, suffrage, boycott, impeachment, segregation, Rhodesia, genocide, riot, racism, gay rights, marriage equality, anti-fascism, prohibition, abortion

Keyword (photography): gelatin silver print, press print, photojournalism, documentary photography, fine art photography, mutoscope poster, stereoview, stereograph


Hayley Snyder
75
 

Flying Insects

A large collection of objects and images related to flying insects, including ladybugs, dragonflies, bees, butterflies, moths, and fireflies

Katherine Schoonover
63
 

Collisions in Portraiture

Collisions in Portraiture highlights the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture to reveal what happens when cultures collide. By analyzing portraiture, students will consider how cultural collisions are visualized from the nineteenth to twenty-first centuries. Students will explore the powerful contributions to the history and culture of the United States through portraiture.

Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to: 

  • Examine how modern and contemporary artists use portraiture to reveal aspects of a sitter’s individual, community/cultural, and national identity. 
  • Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what one can learn about the sitter through these components. 
  • Discuss the artistic choices that portrait artists make and consider how such decisions can reveal the artists’ viewpoints and also influence the viewers’ understanding of the sitters’ identity. 
  • Use the museum’s collection as a gateway to investigating and exploring of the visualization of colliding cultures.

#NPGteach

Keywords

Portraiture, Collisions, Harriet Tubman, Civil War, Stonewall, Roger Shimomura, Chief Joseph, Robert Rauschenberg, United Farm Workers

Nicole Vance
44
 

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

How do we  strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. 

For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

This collection contains several sub-collections that explore different topics related to this event.  Learn more at https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

#ViralHistories

National Museum of American History
7
 

Art & Resistance 3: The Poetry of Joy Harjo (Part B)

The purpose of this Joy Harjo inspired collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for poetry study 
      • as a followup to Art & Resistance 3:  Kent Monkman & Indian Residential Schools (Part A)
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text

"(At Home) On Art and Resiliece: Artist Talk with Kent Monkman" presented by the Hirshhorn Museum inspired me to create a collection that, like his art, speaks to the complicated relationship between between indigenous people and settlers in America. I resonated with Monkman's artistic ethos about the heretofore missing narratives of indigenous people and the limited colonial perspective from which their history is most often told. 

Prior to hearing Monkman speak, I had begun crafting a Smithsonian Learning Lab series of collections centering creators from marginalized groups in America breaking out from preconceptions of their "place" in America's racialized hierarchy.  Art and Resistance 1 is a collection that centers Frederick Douglass as a master of 19th century's version of social media. He wielded his likeness as a weapon against the ubiquity of the anti-black/ racist imagery of his time.  Art and Resistance 2 is an homage to professor, editor, and Nobel & Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Toni Morrison. The collection centers her literary ethos to be among and to write about the African American experience, outside of the white gaze. 

During the Hirshhorn Zoom event, when Monkman spoke of the resiliency of indigenous people, I knew they would be the subject of my next collection.  In view of my students' limited experience interrogating the complexities of Indian History, Monkman's paintings The Scream and The Scoop provided a visceral entrypoint for my students to get engaged in studying the shameful policy of Residential Indian Boarding Schools as historical and cultural context for a subsequent literary study of the poetry of America's Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.


Sher Anderson Petty
20
 

Conducting an Oral History: Tips from Across the Smithsonian

Oral history is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information – primary source material – from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. This collection includes tips for conducting your own oral history from a student journalist and a historian, guides with suggestions for setting up your own interview, and recorded oral histories from key moments documenting a range of events in 20th century history. 

Recommended questions to consider with this collection of resources: What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding historic events?  How do oral histories compare to other sources of information? How can what we learn in school help us understand and process the experience of today, in the context of history? What is our responsibility to document, reflect, and advocate? 

Ashley Naranjo
15
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