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Found 5,998 Collections

 

Statue of Freedom

Through the cooperation of the Architect of the Capitol, Hon. Edward Clark, the original full-size plaster model of the "Statue of Freedom" by sculptor Thomas Crawford which sits atop the dome of the United States Capitol Building was transferred from the basement of the Capitol to the United States National Museum building, now the Arts and Industries Building, and was installed in the Rotunda on December 15, 1890.
Jeff Holliday
39
 

Roman Gladiators

Topical collection for teachers to share with their students. Includes resources highlighting what it meant to be an Ancient Roman gladiator through re-creation of events and gladiator garb. Includes videos on gladiator life, an artist's representation of gladiators, and an article on modern gladiator re-creations. (Collection created by summer 2015 intern, Sarah Trop)
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Looking at Ancient Civilization through Objects

Teacher's guide on how to facilitate student investigation of archaeological remains. Includes examples of objects to use (Ancient Chinese oracle bones) and a handout on artifact analysis. Close reading strategy (most commonly applied to text) adapted here to analysis of cultural artifacts. Concept can be replicated for other artifacts and cultures.
Tess Porter
6
 

Black History: Black Heritage Stamp Series

A topical collection featuring African-American leaders, inventors, activists, sports figures, and culture-shapers whose lives changed history. Teaching Tips can be found in "notes."

These stamps are part of the Black Heritage Stamp Series. U.S. postage stamps were in use for nearly a century before Booker T. Washington became the first African American to appear on one. A handful of additional black history-related designs appeared between 1940 and 1978, when the U.S. Postal Service introduced the Black Heritage series. USPS continues to issue a stamp featuring a notable Black American every February in conjunction with Black History Month and at other times during the year. Today the Black Heritage issues are the longest-running U.S. stamp series.
Emily Murgia
38
 

Giant Panda Baby - Video resources to complement nonfiction book

A collection to complement "Welcome, BaoBao," a Smithsonian nonfiction book published by Penguin Young Readers, 2015. The book presents facts about pandas and their care at the National Zoo and describes their natural and zoo habitats. The videos in this collection allow children to see the baby panda in motion, hear the noises it makes, and find out what its fur feels like. The video "Sleepy Panda" shows the animal's habitat in China, with a map to indicate where it is on the continent. The final resource connects to the National Zoo's live "panda cam."
Michelle Smith
7
 

Ancient Egypt

Kim Palermo
5
 

Photographs from Ellis Island

This is a collection of five photographs taken in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as well as a handout to be used with the photos. Use the collection as a warm up or prompt for further research about the experience of immigrants to America. Teachers could assign different photographs to small groups so that students can share ideas and questions as they closely examine each one, focusing on differences between what is clearly evident in each photo as well as what can be inferred or hypothesized.

What can we learn about the experience of immigrants at Ellis Island from photographs? What emotions are expressed in these images? Challenge students to consider the photographers process and perspective: Are these images staged or candid? What kind of statement do you think the photographer might be making about immigration at this time?

More teaching ideas are include in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

Kate Harris
8
 

Innovations in Coffee Cup Lids

Sometimes innovations are about something completely new and sometimes innovations are about small refinements in design. What can we learn about innovation from looking at something as ordinary as a coffee cup lid? Read the article about coffee cup lids and write a description for one of the lids, capturing its unique qualities. How do changes in coffee cup lids reflect larger changes in our society? Predict what will be the next innovation .
Stephanie Norby
57
 

American Inventions and Innovation

Read an article about the opening of the "American Inventions" exhibition in the National Museum of American History. Examine some of the artifacts featured in the exhibition and select one that you believe had the greatest impact. Write a persuasive essay on why this invention is so important.
Stephanie Norby
12
 

Innovations and Milestones in Flight

This teaching collection includes a teaching poster, website, video, and digital images about the six milestones of flight.
Stephanie Norby
11
 

The Wright Brothers -- Invention or Innovation?

This is a teaching collection about the Wright Brothers and their invention process. What is the difference between innovation and invention?
Stephanie Norby
12
 

American Authors and Innovation

Choose one of the American authors in this collection. Research the author and read some of his or her writings. Write a short persuasive essay arguing whether or not this author was innovative and if so how. Discuss whether or not innovation is important in determining the strength of a writer's work.

Analyze the portrait of your author using the portrait handout. Does the portrait capture the qualities that made this author innovative? If not, how would you change the portrait to capture these qualities?
Stephanie Norby
48
 

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin & Experiments and Observations on Electricity
Steven Hartnett
9
 

George Washington: A Mythical Being

In my lesson, I projected my collection through AppleTV on a screen in the front of class. I tried to play on the students' imagination and have them think about whom this character could be. Their objective was to point out specific details in the image and voice them to class. I did not have them begin guessing who the "Mythical Being" was until we got to the 7th slide. The farther we progressed, the students began to put more and more clues together. This was a good anticipatory set to our cartoon activity pertaining to George Washington's 110 Rules of Civility and Decent Behavior.

Jourdan Englert
9
 

Immigration and Refugees

This collection is utilized in a college classroom focused on research and argumentation.  

#MCteach

Jamie Gillan
35
 

Symbolism, Story, and Art: Achelous & Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules," a website, and video discussions by curators and educators. The website includes an interactive exploring areas of interest on the piece, as well as lesson and activity ideas for the classroom.

Tags: greece
Tess Porter
6
 

Blue and White Porcelain

Cross cultural journey

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
46
 

Investigating a Place: California

What defines a place? Examine this collection of images from or about California to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How is California connected to other places? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape? Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place (city, region, state). Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. Discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.
Stephanie Norby
68
 

Investigating a Place: Niagara Falls

What defines a place? Examine this collection of images from or about Niagara Falls to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How is Niagara Falls connected to other places? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape? Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place. Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. In class discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.
Stephanie Norby
17
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Michelle Smith
14
 

Evolution of Inventions

This collection is a visual representation of the evolution of the telephone
Katrina Rainer
2
 

Declaration of Independence Resources

A topical collection of resources related to the Declaration of Independence that provides context. (1) Jefferson's mobile desk, on which the Declaration was drafted, (2) the scene of its drafting, (3) the audio and text of the document, (4) a lesson plan focuses on how it came about, how it was designed and the compromises that were necessary, (5) an online exhibition featuring Thomas Paine and his pamphlet 'Common Sense', another resource on what led to the Declaration, and (6) a commemorative bandanna of the original document suggests how the Declaration was valued.
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Ancient Egypt: Canopic Jars

This is a collection of canopic jars, which were used to store the organs of the deceased in the burial chambers of ancient Egyptians. As you look through these images, think about what kinds of characteristics they all have in common. What differences do you see? Pay attention to materials used, shape of the jars, and images on the lids.
Kate Harris
7
 

Egyptian Burial Masks

A collection presenting an array of Egyptian burial masks.
Amy Williams
11
73-96 of 5,998 Collections