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ZooLights 2019

National Zoo
ZooLights, powered by Pepco, a part of their annual holiday tradition. A free event, ZooLights includes live music performances, tasty winter treats and plenty of opportunities for holiday shopping. More than 500,000 environmentally friendly LED lights transform the Zoo into a winter wonderland! New this year: enjoy dozens of large, glowing animal lanterns and stroll through thousands of reflecting lights as part of the interactive ⁠— and highly Instagrammable — art exhibit called "Entre Les Rangs."

Zoo Vets: Zebras and Education

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her—and a couple of other women at the Zoo—talk about educating children about science and zebra rumps.

Zoo Vets: Working with Pandas

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her—and a couple of other women at the Zoo—talk about working with giant pandas, and the importance of training and teamwork.

Zoo Vets: Elephant Aromas

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her—and a couple of other women at the Zoo—talk about the smell of elephants and some of the unusual perks of being a Zoo veterinarian.

Zoo Vets: Education

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her—and a couple of other women at the Zoo—talk about educating the next generation of scientists.

Zoo Vets: Claws, Paws, and Fins : Sneak Peek

Smithsonian Channel
Their patients live underwater, fly through the air and come in every imaginable shape and size. From the Show: Zoo Vets: Claws, Paws, and Fins http://bit.ly/2yK4JQk

Zoo Vets: Chief Veterinarian at the National Zoo

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her talk about achieving her dream of becoming chief veterinarian at the National Zoo

Zoo Vets: A Day in the Life of a Vet

National Zoo
Smithsonian Channel presents insights into the life of Suzan Murray, the National Zoo's chief veterinarian. Hear her—and a Zoo Vet Katharine Hope—talk about what a day in the life of a Zoo vet is like.

Zoo Keepers Rock! National Zoo Keeper Week 2010

National Zoo
Zoo keepers are some of the hardest working and coolest people around. Celebrate Zoo Keeper Week 2010 at the National Zoo, or at your local zoo!

Zoo Jobs: Meet an Endocrinologist

National Zoo
Ever wonder what it’s like to be an endocrinologist at the National Zoo? Middle school students should check out, “Other Duties as Assigned: The Secret World of Zoo Jobs.” Meet Sarah Putman, endocrinologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute.

Zoo Jobs: Meet a Landscape Architect

National Zoo
Did you know design and architecture is really important at the National Zoo? Middle school students meet a landscape architect in “Other Duties as Assigned: The Secret World of Zoo Jobs” which may inspire and engage future Zoo professionals.

Zoo Jobs: Meet a Curator

National Zoo
Middle school students watch the last video in the series, “Other Duties as Assigned: The Secret World of Zoo Jobs” If you wondered about what it’s like to work with great cats, bears and other animals, meet Curator Craig Saffoe! #STEM #WeSaveSpecies

Zoo Jobs: Meet Small Mammal Biologist at National Zoo

National Zoo
Attention middle school students, the video series, “Other Duties as Assigned: The Secret World of Zoo Jobs,” is a cool way for you to learn about Zoo careers. Go behind the scenes and be inspired by four staff members—a biologist, endocrinologist, landscape architect and curator. Kicking off the series, meet Kenton Kerns, biologist at the Zoo’s Small Mammal House.

Zoanthid larva (Zoantharia)

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
Recently we went to the bay of Panama to collect plankton and we found a Zoanthid larva.

Zingg's Tarahumara Footage 1933

Human Studies Film Archives
Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee Footage shot by anthropologist Robert Zingg in the Sierra Madre of northern Mexico of the Tarahumara (or Raramuri), most probably during Easter Week ceremonies. The syncretic rituals, dances, and costumes depicted in this "fiesta" reflect the legacy of the Tarahumara mission system as it developed under the authority of Spanish Jesuits and Franciscans during the 17th and 18th century. During Holy Week, the central theme of the Tarahumara fiesta is the conflict between God and the Devil and the necessity of restoring balance in the world. The Tarahumara are divided into soldalities as "Pharisees", allies of the Devil, and Captains or Soldiers, the allies of God. Much of what appears in Zingg's film document requires analysis in terms of this cosmological opposition. This ethnographic document opens with two lines of male dancers assembled on a patio outside of a native church. Dressed in long capes and crowns, they are seen performing a "matachin" dance accompanied by violin players. Shots of a man with a rattle intoning a praise chant (probably a "tutuburi") are followed by a procession of Pharisees and Soldiers circumambulating and entering the church. The former are identified either by hats adorned with plumed turkey feathers or white earth used to decorate their bodies or faces. Young boys (apparently being initiated as Pharisees), are shown having their bodies with white earth and being led in a dance by an adult sponsor. A second group of dancers is seen performing a "Pharisee dance" characterized by high skipping steps. Communicants are then seen filing into the church and following a processional route through archways constructed of leaves and saplings. Concludes with shots of a Tarahumara running game and various subsistence and craft activities. Footage shot among the Tarahumara (or Raramuri) of Samachique and other sites of the Sierra Madre Mountains in Chihuahua, northern Mexico, in association with Wendell Bennett. Documentation includes a mix of daily year-round activities and rituals held during Easter week. The former includes: man with children dancing a , (a man with rattle intoning a chant), various craft activities, making beer, and the pre-Columbian running game known as . Easter week footage includes the syncretic rituals, dances, and costumes which reflect the legacy of the Tarahumara mission system as it developed under the authority of Spanish Jesuits and Franciscans during the 17th and 18th century. These ritual activities reflect a cosmological opposition between God and his allies, the "soldiers," and the Devil and his allies, the "Pharisees." Tarahumara are seen performing a dance accompanied by violin players and drummers, young boys are shown having their bodies painted as part of the process of being taught how to dance--then performing a Pharisee dance, and communicants are shown filing into a native church and then following an Easter week processional route. Included are shots of yoking an ox and plowing, planting and harvesting corn, making maguey beer, spinning wool and weaving, and pottery making.

Zingg's Huichol Footage 1933-1934

Human Studies Film Archives
Supplementary materials: publications Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee Footage shot among the Huichol of Tuxpan de Bolanos, northern Mexico, is the earliest known motion picture documentation of the Huichol. Footage depicts the distinctively indigenous aspects of Huichol culture and various acculturated aspects derived from Christian influence including or (a first fruits ritual) at the ceremonial center of Ratontita, temple officers returning from a successful deer hunt, a peyote dance, parched corn ceremony, rain-making rituals, Easter Week activities (including the stations of the cross and a procession of the "saints"), and the cambio de las varas, an annual ceremony performed to sanctify the changing of Huichol government officials. Footage also documents Huichol subsistence and craft activities.

Zimba Research Film 1971

Human Studies Film Archives
Supplementary materials: 3,5,6

title supplied by Archives staff (unpublished work) -- archival collection

Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Full film record of a research film project documenting the Zimba, a pastoral Bantu people of southwestern Angola. Footage documents the organization of Zimba homesteads, role of women in the domestic economy, and men engaged in pastoral activities. Sequences include: women threshing, winnowing, and stamping millet (for cereal and beer); milking cows; watering cattle; weaving baskets; and making fences to protect their fields. Men are shown churning milk and herding and watering cattle.

Zhejiang Wu Opera: The Sedan Chair

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Founded in 1956, the Zhejiang Wu Opera Troupe both revives traditional works (some more than four centuries old) and creates new ones. At the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, the troupe performed this piece that portrays a nervous bride and the men who carry her in an imaginary sedan chair to her wedding. Videography: David Barnes, Ed Fry, Max Lenik, Abby Sternberg Editing: Charles Weber [Catalog No. CFV10663; Copyright 2014 Smithsonian Institution]

Zerda's Children 1978

Human Studies Film Archives
title from credits (published work)--archival collection

Supplementary materials: audio tapes, still photographs, production files, correspondence, promotional materials and press clippings.

Archives also holds Spanish language version released under the title Los Hijos de Zerda.

Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research supported processing and the National Film Preservation Foundation and the Smithsonian Latino Center supported preservation of the Jorge Preloran Film Collection.

Cataloging supported by Smithsonian Institution Women's Committee

Donated by Jorge Preloran in 2007.

Edited ethnographic film by Jorge Preloran documents a family of woodcutters living in isolation in the mountains of Calden, at the geographic center of Argentina. Through his narration, Sixto Ramon Zerda explains his wish for his children to be educated and to avoid the punishing work and exploitation he has suffered. Introduction narrated by Henry Fonda.

Zenith Passage at Chichén Itzá

National Museum of the American Indian
This time-lapse video shows how shadows disappear from columns in Chichén Itzá, Yucatán, México during the zenith passage of the Sun.

Zebras of the Arctic: 7 Questions and Answers

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, the symposium presenters respond to questions from the audience. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 6 Kelly Kapsar

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Kelly Kapsar speaks on "Branching Out From the McDonnell Polar Bear Point Project," which features a special preview of a of community produced video from Gambell, Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska. Kelly Kaspar became involved with the Zebras in the Arctic project when she visited Gambell and Savoonga, Alaska, as a part of her work at the Saint Louis Zoo. Currently, she is a Ph.D. student in the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on human and natural systems in the Arctic and their connections to lower latitudes. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.

Zebras of the Arctic: 5 Lisa Lidgus

National Museum of the American Indian
When the Saint Louis Zoo began to develop the interpretation for the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition, along came a new opportunity to discuss climate change with their audiences. "Zebras in the Arctic" presents the connections and results of the journey the zoo took in coming to a First Voices approach to understanding and interpreting the significance of polar bears in the Arctic, which includes their collaboration with Smithsonian’s Arctic Studies Center and the Alaska Nanuuq Commission. In this segment, Lisa Lidgus speaks on "Uncharted Territory: A Zoo’s Attempt At Creating Meaningful, Personal Connections Through First Voices Interpretation," and describes the process for creating video journals and the state of interpretation at the McDonnell Polar Bear Point exhibition at the Saint Louis Zoo. Her presentation includes a short community produced video from Prince of Wales, Alaska. Lisa Lidgus is a Conservation Education Liaison and has worked at the Saint Louis Zoo for 16 years. With a B.A. in Zoology, her background in both conservation education and animal husbandry led her into the field of exhibit design. This work began in 2014 by engaging teachers and students in Alaska Native villages on behalf of this project. She has since transitioned to managing the partnerships between the Zoo and our Alaska Native partners. This program was webcast and recorded at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. on July 21, 2017.
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