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Found 14,518 Resources

Why Building a Carbon Fiber Car Is So Labor-Intensive

Smithsonian Channel
To make the lightest possible sports car, Alfa Romeo knows it needs to build key components using carbon fiber. But it's a complicated and extremely time-consuming process. From the Series: Supercar Superbuild: Alfa Romeo 4C http://bit.ly/2Fr4ABc

You Probably Don't Want Your Airline Pilot to Try This

Smithsonian Channel
Third generation stunt pilot and Minnesota's favorite daredevil, John Mohr, attempts astonishing aerial acrobatics in his 1943 Stearman biplane. From: AERIAL AMERICA http://bit.ly/1vBkZZC

Designing the Modern Kids' Rooms with Cookie Magazine (Pt1 of 2)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Cookie Magazine, the stylish parenting magazine for the new mom and dad, fills its pages and website with gorgeous, fanciful, and delightful examples of kids’ rooms. Join Cookie Home Editor, Kiera Coffee, for a presentation by selected kids’ room designers including Adam Weintraub and Mishi Hosono from KOKO Architecture, Jennifer Ward from MINOR DETAILS, and Jan Eleni from Jan Eleni Interiors. Pick up some fun ideas and things to try in your kids’ room today! Before the presentation, enjoy a private viewing of Wall Stories: Children’s Wallpaper and Books, to see the evolution of wallpaper designed for kids rooms. Smithsonian, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Mesuem

Bugged Out! BugBot video

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Bugged Out is a teen art-science workshop hosted by the ARTLAB+ and Q?rius (NMNH), Bugged Out! gives teens a chance to explore different kinds of bugs, talk to an expert, and explore the Insect Zoo. Teens will then take inspiration from actual bugs to create their own robotic or moving bug creature using small motors, LED lights, aluminum, leather and more!

Choctaw Festival Day 1 - Prayer, Welcome, and Introduction 2

National Museum of the American Indian
The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma celebrates its tribal history and heritage with two days of dance, song, storytelling, and artist demonstrations. In this segment, the afternoon of first day of the festival begins with a welcome from Assistant Chief Jack Austin, Jr., followed by a prayer given by Waddell Hearn. Brad Joe then sings The Lord's Prayer in Choctaw as the Choctaw royalty interpret in American Indian sign language. The Choctaw royalty include Miss Choctaw Nation Neiatha Hardy, Little Miss Ariana Byington, and Junior Miss Loren Crosby. Chief Batton then gives an introduction to the history and culture of the Choctaw Nation and the afternoon's proceedings. This program was webcast and recorded in the Potomac Atrium of the National Museum of the American Indian on June 24, 2014.

Hawaii Festival 2016: The Aloha Boys

National Museum of the American Indian
The Aloha Boys and local Hawaiian dancers give a Mele and Hula Honoring the Hōk̄̄ule‘a. This performance was webcast and recorded in the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on May 29, 2016.

Fish Food Feeding Frenzy

Smithsonian Channel
At the Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce, the most exciting time at the fish tank is feeding time. From: CREATURES OF THE LAGOON http://bit.ly/1wRbsf0

The Mystery of the Magnificent Monks Mound

Smithsonian Channel
Monks Mound in Illinois is the largest-known prehistoric earthwork in the Western Hemisphere. Built by the Mississippian people, it's a stunning site, but its purpose is largely unknown. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Illinois http://bit.ly/1QoAwqb

Komodo Dragons Can Taste Their Prey From Miles Away

Smithsonian Channel
A Komodo dragon's strongest sensory organ is its deeply forked tongue. It acts as a meal detector that samples the air for dead or dying animals. From: DRAGON ISLAND http://bit.ly/2ajq2ri

Why Do Flamingos Stand on One Leg?

Smithsonian Channel
Flamingos must tire of constantly perching on one leg. Or do they? We ask a caretaker at Smithsonian's National Zoo. #ZooQs From: WILD INSIDE THE NATIONAL ZOO: The Great Night Heron Mystery http://bit.ly/149227l

Speed Kills - Sneak Peek

Smithsonian Channel
After millions of years of evolution, the world's fastest predators only need a fraction of a second to kill. From: SPEED KILLS http://bit.ly/1jRSEvu

Is This Ancient Palace the Inspiration Behind the Minotaur?

Smithsonian Channel
Discover the inspiration for the tale of Theseus and the Minotaur. Travel to the island of Knossos where ancient Greeks participated in an elaborate form of bullfighting. From: MUSEUM SECRETS REVEALED: Athens http://bit.ly/1nKuQIx

An Up-Close Look at the Royal Regalia

Smithsonian Channel
The Royal Regalia represent two millennia of a nation's sovereignty and symbolize numerous aspects of its power. From the Show: The Coronation http://bit.ly/TheCoronation

These Feisty Female Lemurs Fight With Babies on Their Backs

Smithsonian Channel
In ring-tailed lemur society, it's the females who call the shots. They live in groups of up to 30 members and the alpha female will fight hard to protect her territory. From the Series: Amazing Monkeys: Conquest of Africa http://bit.ly/2zcJhlY

Why Design Now? Solving Global Challenges Conference - part 11

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
How can we power the world with clean energy? How can we improve the quality of life through health-care innovations? Design has emerged as a powerful tool to help businesses offer ingenious and often disruptive solutions to the world's most complex problems. Join us as leading thinkers, scientists and designers share their expertise and discuss how design can accelerate innovation and provide efficient and scalable solutions to the most pressing global needs. This program was a collaboration with GE and Smithsonian, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum.

Bak'tun 13 Festival: The 13 Bak'tun as Challenge to the Western Mind

National Museum of the American Indian
December 21, 2012, signals the much-anticipated passing of the "13 B'ak'tun" in the ancient American indigenous system of time keeping. As we approach the Mayan Calendar day that marks the turn of eras, Dr. Victor Montejo offers a fascinating presentation on the deep meaning of millennial Maya culture and history from the perspective of a noted Native scholar and author. Victor Montejo is a Jakaltek Maya originally from Guatemala. Previously a professor and chair of the Native American Studies Department at the University of California, Davis, Dr. Montejo now lives in Guatemala. He was formerly Minister of Peace in the Guatemalan Republic. Montejo also served as a member of the Guatemalan National Congress from 2004 to 2008. An internationally recognized author, Montejo's major publications include Testimony: Death of a Guatemalan Village; Voices from Exile: Violence and Survival in Modern Maya History; Maya Intellectual Renaissance: Critical Essays on Identity, Representation and Leadership; Popol Vuh: Sacred Book of the Mayas; and Q'anil: Man of Lightning. His current projects focus on indigenous migration and transnationalism, as well as in developing a curriculum in Native knowledge and epistemology in his new manuscript, Mayalogue: An Interactionist Theory of Indigenous Cultures. This event was webcast from the Rasmuson Theater of the National Museum of the American Indian on December 15, 2012.

Bill's Design Talks: David Owen and Our Green Metropolis

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
New York City is widely considered an ecological nightmare, a wasteland of concrete and high-rises, diesel fumes and traffic jams, garbage and pollution. But in the groundbreaking work of contrarian environmental thinking that is Green Metropolis, David Owen declares New York City as the greenest community in America. In Green Metropolis, David Owen conceives a new environmentalism, turning what we think we know about the environment on its head and re-envisioning a sustainable future that looks less like Thoreau's cabin at Walden Pond and more like the populous megacities of Hong Kong or New York. Bill Moggridge and David Owen will be joined in conversation by Andrea Lipps, curatorial assistant for National Design Triennial: Why Design Now? and upcoming exhibition, Critical Mass.

Star Stories: The Fox and the Stars

National Museum of the American Indian
This animation tells the Chippewa story describing how a man's pet fox scattered the stars across the sky. It is one of nine traditional Native American stories that are part of the National Museum of the American Indian inaugural exhibition "Our Universes: Traditional Knowledge Shapes Our World," which is on view through April 20, 2019.

Battle at Sea: Jutland (Full Episode)

Smithsonian Channel
The 1916 Battle of Jutland left thousands dead and destroyed the reputation of British Admiral John Jellicoe. Watch as his grandson joins a scientific expedition to reveal shocking truths about WWI's largest battle at sea. From the Show: Battle at Sea: Jutland http://bit.ly/2HGS6tv

The Paschall Brothers rehearse the song I'll be Satisfied"

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
Tidewater gospel quartet is a long and proud a cappella tradition, and the Paschall Brothers are among its last tradition-bearers. With a seemingly unbreakable family bond, the Paschall Brothers have followed in the footsteps of their father, Reverend Frank Paschall Sr. (1923--1999), who led them both philosophically and musically by example. Since the 1960s, the Tidewater style of a cappella gospel has all but disappeared. However, with the descendants of Frank Paschall Sr. the tradition continues to fulfill its purpose of bringing the good news to all those who want to hear it. Here the brothers rehearse and discuss their father's legacy at their Newport, Virginian home. [Catalog No. - CFV10077; Copyright - 2007 Smithsonian Institution]

The Real Excalibur

Smithsonian Channel
According to blacksmiths and historians, King Arthur's legendary sword may have been a roman pattern-welded longsword. From the Series: Mystery Files: King Arthur http://bit.ly/2gCHi0G

Smithsonian Channel

Smithsonian Channel
Watch full episodes and short videos from Smithsonian Channel's vast library of shows about everything from space exploration to world history and wild animals to popular music. Watch Smithsonian Channel here: http://bit.ly/2ij6V6J Watch more: http://bit.ly/2ij6V6J

Cherry Blossom by Antenna

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Industrial designers Masamichi Udagawa and Sigi Moeslinger are partners in the firm Antenna. Udagawa and Moeslinger create functional products for complex systems. For the 2003 Triennial (Inside Design Now), Antenna created a shower of cherry blossoms. Petals float and cluster in relation to the number of visitors traversing the Museum's grand staircase, creating a satisfying symmetry between the electrodes that trigger the blossoms and the nerve endings they touch in us. http://www.antennadesign.com/

Beale Street's Memphis Blues

Smithsonian Channel
Beale Street in downtown Memphis was officially declared the "Home of the Blues" by an act of Congress in 1977. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Tennessee http://bit.ly/1rj9kuP
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