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Found 1,658 Collections

 

What do you see? Using the lens of art to discover hidden history

2017 NCHE Presentation- Lash and Rickman

Stephanie Lash
17
 

What do you see? Using the lens of art to discover hidden history

2017 NCHE Presentation- Lash and Rickman

jorjan woodward
17
 

What Are Those?

Learn about life in early Chinese urban society by analyzing oracle bone divinations, the earliest form of writing in China. Students discuss with their groups what they think these pictures are showing then they compare early Chinese urban society to other Bronze Age societies in this student activity.
Monica Ziemski
6
 

Westward Expansion through Various Eyes

Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way


#SAAMteach

Mary Brunz
12
 

Westward Expansion

Created for a 4th Grade Classroom

Jennifer Smith
52
 

Westinghouse: The Man and the Companies

This is a collection of teaching resources available on the topic of George Westinghouse as well as Westinghouse Electric Company (founded 1886) and its spinoffs (including the broadcasting company and nuclear energy company).

Fun fact: During the 20th century, Westinghouse engineers and scientists were granted more than 28,000 US government patents, the third most of any company (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westinghouse_Electric_Company#cite_note-2009profile-14)
Adam Forgie
18
 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Weikers Family Collection Class Warm-Up

This is a single document with hot spots and questions used to model primary source analysis for a sixth grade class. It is drawn from a collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States. You can find the full collection here:

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/weikers-family-collection/zGJCDjyWqouEufnb

Questions to consider are:

a. Who are the Weikers?

b. Where did they live?

c. When did they live? What can they tell us about this time in history?

d. How were they affected by Nazi Germany?

e. What did they feel about the Nazis?

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources, Pittsburgh

Kate Harris
2
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.

Also included in this collection is an accompanying activity sheet on building archival narratives. This prompt is meant to guide students through the process of building the Weikers family story based on the records that they created and kept during a harrowing chapter in their history.



For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Sierra Green
11
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.


For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Aubrey Gennari
9
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.

For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

Molly Long
11
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Michele Hubert
10
 

Weapons of World War I

Leah Knecht
13
 

Weapons of War (1600-1800)

Weapons that were used during the 1600 till early 1800 were mostly muskets, rifles, pistols, and swords. Muskets were used by infantry men, rifles by hunters, and pistols and swords by high ranking officers. Muskets were slow and difficult to load. Depending on the man, it took about 30 seconds to load a musket. Experienced shooters could fire 3 shots in a minute. Rifles were even slower, but the accuracy made for the lack of firing rate. Muskets were muzzle loaded, which means that the powder and bullet were poured into the barrel. Rifles and pistols, on the other hand, were flintlocked. That means those guns were ignited by flint and steel. Guns, obviously, were used for long range battles or fights. That leaves us with the melee battles or fights. Swords were used for this type of battle. Most swords were double edged, which means that it could be used on both sides. Those swords that were not double edged were known as sabers.

Bigger weapons that were used in war were pikes and cannons. Pikes were very long spears that could exceed 22 feet. They were not used for throwing, instead, it was used defensively to protect infantry men. The cannon, another defensive weapon, was used to protect troops when preparing to deploy and/or advancing in the field. The cannon could throw 4 to 12 pound cast iron balls that reached 600 to 1800 yards.





Websites Used:

Colonial Williamsburg Online Collection

http://emuseum.history.org/vie...

The Lesson Locker

http://thelessonlocker.com/mat...

Rob Ossian's Pirate's Cove

http://www.thepirateking.com/h...

aagaines.com

http://www.aagaines.com/man/18...

Kevin Baez
12
 

Wealth in the America's

Wealth in the America's could be reflected from the shoes that people wear to the house that one may live it. Being wealthy is something many dreamed of and their wealth was measured by what type material of clothing as well as the color and even artwork on anything that they own. Wealth was measured by many things that only a certain amount of people were able to show off.

People were able to become wealthy do to their professional life by making money as a lawyer, judge, or by being a slave owner.

The collection is of what a typical wealthy person would own around the 18th century. 

Shoes

Clothing, such as the dress and the three piece suit

Wigs

Tea sets

Vases

Artwork

and their homes

Jesus Casique
10
 

We the People: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2018 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.” The title for the opening panel is "The Smithsonian Institution: “A Community of Learning and the Opener of Doors.”

Four Smithsonian staff members will present, including Richard Kurin (SI Distinguished Scholar and Ambassador-at-Large, Office of the Secretary), Jessica Johnson (Digital Engagement Producer, National Museum of African American History and Culture), Lisa Sasaki (Director, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center), and Chris Wilson (Director, Program in African American Culture, National Museum of American History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included here.


#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

We the People: a Deeper Understanding of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution

This lesson works best for 8th grade U.S. History, after students have learned how the original plan for government (the Articles of Confederation) was failing the newly independent America and how the state delegates met in the summer of 1787 to correct these failings and ended up writing a new Constitution. 

Students start by using the VTS thinking routine to examine Preamble by Mike Wilkins, an engaging and accessible way to 'read' the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution.  

After 'decoding' the words and noticing all the details they can, students use a handout to analyze the language of the actual Preamble and discuss word choice and intended meaning (they might also look at the photo of the actual Constitution at this point to compare the original with Mike WIlkins' work).  

They then read and analyze 4 quotes from The Federalist Papers defending the Constitution to the states who were about to vote to ratify it as a jumping off point to discuss what the Constitution was meant to achieve for the newly formed states.  Discussion about reasons why states would not want to join this union will also add to the understanding of what was at stake for each state. In addition, looking at a graphic organizer showing state and federal powers under this plan for government will help students see how this system divides power between the states and the national government.

Students then return to the original artwork, and decide if analysis of the meaning of the Preamble and the ideals of the Constitution affect how students 'see' the artwork. Using the 'connect/extend/challenge' visual routine, teachers can record what the students connected to, what new ideas pushed their thinking in different directions, and what is still challenging or confusing about the artwork or the Preamble.  

Some possible extension ideas are included in the collection to highlight the differences between the states as well as their similarities/unity, such as creating another artwork using an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence (while adhering to state DMV rules for vanity plates), and  comparing front pages of different states' daily newspapers. #SAAMteach

Aileen Albertson
9
 

We the People

Essential Questions:

What would cause a people to revolt against their government?

Why does a society need a system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand their system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand the history of their country?

Understanding Moves: Making Connections, Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence, Build Explanations

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

#PZPGH

Gary Galuska
18
 

Wayne Moeck 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to show our understanding of the 1920s and the 1930s by finding pictures from the 1920s and 30s and writing about why they were important during the time.

wayne moeck
10
 

Wayne Moeck 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to show our understanding of the 1920s and the 1930s by finding pictures from the 1920s and 30s and writing about why they were important during the time.

wayne moeck
10
 

Way of Life in Colonial America

The Colonial Period is very important for the reason that during this period, colonists spent this time forming a better life from their old one, at the same time learning and adapting to the new environment. Children during this period spend most of their childhood learning from their parents, there was not time for school. 

Nonetheless there are numerous innovations and ideas that have evolved and made it into present day society. In my collection of art work there is a mix of a little of everything that ties back to the way of living that took place during the colonial period. Most of these artwork correlate with daily lifestyles and also ways to pass time during the day. 

Hakeem Alfeche
10
 

Waves of Hope: Asian American History in Austin

In this collection, students will learn about Asian American history in Austin. Austin is home to many Asian Americans along with their rich history, culture, and traditions that are preserved and passed on to future generations by their families and communities. This exhibit showcases some of the history that is lesser known but nevertheless important to document and remember. All of the images can be found at the Austin History Center, which houses an Asian American Archival Collection of manuscript collections, photographs, clippings, books, periodicals and other items.

This exhibit was developed by the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center and the Austin History Center.

Educators and students may use this online exhibit to supplement Texas History lessons and as a supplement to the full exhibit stored at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center (AARC). Currently, Waves of Hope is not on display at the AARC. Please contact the site at 512-974-1700 or aarc@austintexas.gov with any questions.

keywords: texas history, asian american,  Texas asians, austin, austin history, austin history center, immigration


#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

#TCSAARC  

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
41
 

Water-Related Hazards: Tsunamis

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely tsunamis. It includes videos and images of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Japanese tsunami, as well as the 1755 Portugese tsunami that coincided with an earthquake and firestorm all at once.
Ashley Naranjo
6
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