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Found 2,016 Collections

 

2019 National High School Design Competition

2019 CHALLENGE

Cooper Hewitt is delighted to announce the theme of the 2019 National High School Design Competition: The Nature of Design: What would you design (or redesign) that is a nature-based solution to a global problem?

ABOUT THE COMPETITION

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum launched the National High School Design Competition in collaboration with Target in 2016. Every year, students around the country are challenged to design a solution to a unique scenario, inspired by Cooper Hewitt’s rich collection and stimulating exhibitions.

Visit Cooper Hewitt website to learn more  
WWW.COOPERHEWITT.ORG/DESIGNCOMPETITION


Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
19
 

25 of the Most Powerful Women of the Last Century

Who are the women who have most influenced our world over the past century? What did they do to make themselves noteworthy? Your task is to research each woman, establish a timeline and place her in the proper order then write 4-6 sentences about her accomplishments and their historical impact on the world.
Linda Muller
21
 

3-D Resources from the Smithsonian

This collection provides an introduction to the 3D resources available from the Smithsonian Institution. All of the items in this collection are videos showing 3D models or sharing the process of creating such materials. To explore the models directly in a 3D viewer, download file information, and discover tours and other educator resources, please visit 3d.si.edu.

Models of interest to K-12 teachers might include:

  • Apollo 11 command module
  • Amelia Earhart's flight suit
  • Liang Bua (archaeological site where homo floriensis was discovered)
  • Funerary bust of Haliphat (from Palmyra)
  • Jamestown burial sites and artifacts
  • David Livingstone's gun
  • Porcelain dishes and other home items in the Freer Gallery of Art (from Asian cultures)
  • Killer Whale Hat
  • Whale and dolphin fossils
  • Cosmic Buddha
  • Woolly mammoth skeleton
  • Wright Brothers flyer
  • Gunboat Philadelphia
Kate Harris
19
 

3D Printing/ Printmaking with Latin American Designs

This collection is hopefully an inspiration for young designers and artist to use designs and motifs from Mexico, Peru, Panama, and Guatemala. This collection shows you a pathway to create designs based on these motifs and artwork to use in 3D printing using  Morphi and other tools to create prints using relief printing making techniques. (This lesson is more focused on 9-18 year olds, but can be adapted for older students, as well as adults with some rewriting and restructuring. I also have run the printmaking section with younger students, but with the 3D relief plates already being printed, or facilitated by adults, teachers, or parents to help them with the process so as to make it a successful lesson. )

 You will be creating and studying these cultural artifacts to gain insight into how they were constructed, drawn, and fabricated. Ours of course are totally opposite of how these fabric fragments and other examples were constructed, but they can help a student (and yourself ) gain insight into the process that these cultures used to created these designs, art and patterns within the drawings. In order to gain perspective on these cultures, the research your students use by viewing and constructing their own designs will give agency to their work, albeit through the eyes of these ancient craftsman, designer, and artist. The students will gain a new understanding and vision of these cultural motifs and what they carry to the viewer.

Students will be creating and researching geometric designs and motifs based on ancient to modern patterns from Peru, Mexico, and other areas. Once they have constructed and drawn an idea either through digital or non-digital means, they will be rendering their designs in Morphi or another 3D modeling app. Here is a link to a design I did specifically for this lesson on Youmagine that you can use with your prints, as well as your students.

The students will then export these files to be 3D sliced for the printer. I suggest using Cura as this is my go to software for getting digital files ready for the 3D printer. Depending on your press, I suggest making the geometric design small and thin enough that they fit in your print bed, so you might need to resize the design in Cura. If you do not own press, you can use tools to do relief prints like you would any regular printmaking project.Iif you have access, you can use the OpenPressProject to print your own, which I highly recommend as it is my preferred method that I printed my designs in the last resource of this collection.

The inking process should be similar to regular relief printmaking, depending on your students design complexity, and you can experiment with texture, motifs, multiple plates, etc. based on the  resources that are in this collection.

Happy Printing!

#LatinoHAC

Christopher Sweeney
43
 

6 Jewish American objects for Jewish American Heritage Month

This is a collection of six objects, from the National Museum of American History, that were selected by museum staff for what they reveal about the Jewish American experience.

I've created this collection from the blog post by Tory Alrman. Tory Altman has also blogged about patriotic songs beyond the national anthem and what it means to be American.

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

A "Family Lessons" Storybook Activity for the Classroom or Home, with examples of student work

This collection includes instructions and ideas for a classroom activity designed to get children and their families talking and creating together. It is suitable for K-5 classrooms, as an art, English, or social studies-based activity. Included here are examples of student work (images and video of students reading their books), as well as images from classroom displays.

In this activity, a 1st grade teacher from a bilingual school in Washington, D.C., used what we called the "Connections" handmade storybook design to have her students share important family lessons. She described how she did the activity: "I loved the book project and found that it was a way to get parents involved in making a book with their child at home. I pre-made the books since I thought the instructions were a little tricky. The instructions were to discuss and write about a Life Lesson that their families taught them. Our students created bilingual Spanish/English books. The format was perfect for this because it could be English on one side and Spanish on the other. Students enjoyed hanging their books up outside of the class for others to read and then sharing them with the class. It really helped them to understand what important life lessons families teach them and it helped to bring students' home knowledge into the classroom. We connected the books to our Life Lessons unit and plan to do the same thing this year."

This project is based on a handmade book design that can be found, along with several others, in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

A Classroom or Family Project: "Today I Am Here," with examples of student work

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

The "Today I Am Here" book is a wonderful classroom activity, made from one sheet of paper, in which students can share their family stories. The design of the book works well for a K-5 classroom displays, and helps to show the breadth and diversity of the class and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. The project also works extremely well with ESOL students of any age, although the teacher will need to be prepared for possible difficult issues to surface. 

Included here are instructions to make the book, examples of student work (images and video of students reading), as well as images from classroom displays.

The book design is one of many available in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.


Philippa Rappoport
9
 

A Country Divided or United?

This collection will include artifacts that both show how wars can bring a country together, but also, how they can divide them. Through conscription, internment and racism, wars divide a countries people. However, through patriotism, volunteers and working together, it can bring people together. Where do you stand?

Compelling Question: Does war divide or unite a country? #TeachingInquiry
Kimberley Dymond
11
 

A Culture of Beauty

A glance at how the aesthetics of Asian Pacific American cultures have been presented, embraced, celebrated, and manipulated in society. For this collection, I went through searches around Asian Pacific American cultures to look at both things that were considered traditionally beautiful and things with beauty not as direct. Examining objects from paintings to designed plates helped to explore what was considered beautiful in many different lenses. The goal was to look at and analyze the presence of beauty in different forms, from stereotypes in Hollywood to architecture, and interpret what these symbolized for a larger society.

Aira Matin
26
 

A Day in the Life of a 18th Century American Child

This collection serves to show how average children lived in the 18th and early 19th century. Children lived quite differently than kids do today. As infants, mothers tried their best to keep their children safe, but their child care methods were unconventional and sometimes unnecessary due to the lack of information available to them about child development. Families often had many children to counteract the high infant mortality rate of the time. In many cases, a parent would die young as well, leaving widows with no choice other than to give their kids up for adoption and hope that a wealthy family will take good care of their child. Growing up, there was a clear divide between girls and boys and their path in life. Both sexes were educated, but boys had the opportunity to learn more, while the goal for a girl was to be taught how to become a good wife. The strict culture prevented much free time for playing games and simply being a kid. Religion played a role in how children were raised and behaved. Rules and discipline kept them in line from as young as when they learned to walk. Each piece in this collection will further illustrate the contrast between colonial and modern day childhood.

Jennifer Carroll
10
 

A Golden Destiny: Manifest Destiny and Westward Expansion

This collection explores Leutze's Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way in connection to westward expansion, Lundeberg's Pioneers of the West, and Whitman's poem "Pioneers! O Pioneers!".

#SAAMteach
Lauren Chavey
5
 

A House Divided: Photography in the Civil War

How does photography of the Civil War inform us about this period? This teaching collection includes the lesson plan, A House Divided: Photography of the Civil War, published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Students examine Civil War photographs, write captions, and discuss how viewing photographs enhances your understanding of historical events and concepts.
Stephanie Norby
9
 

A House Divided: Reconstruction

Political leaders and parties in the tense time after the Civil War proposed various plans for Reconstruction. By observing artwork of this period, students will learn how these plans affected the South (and North) and relationships between people of different races and geographic regions.

You will find guiding questions included in the additional text section of each artwork.

Shantelle Jones-Williams
5
 

A Just Society

This collection, first of all, is a work in progress and may change as time goes on. The collection includes pieces that are meant to prompt students to think how to create a "just society" and potential consequences when those ideals don't become reality. #SAAMteach

Nikysha (Nikki) Gilliam
20
 

A Morning in Damascus

This collection features a series of three independent activities around one singular portrait of Bayard Taylor (formally titled A Morning in Damascus) painted by Thomas Hicks, 1855.  Taylor was one of America's foremost and most popular travel writers of the mid to late 19th century.  

These activities were created for my Advanced Placement World History course to practice close reading skills as well as historical thinking skills.  The notations provided here are for teacher reference and would not be given to students. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGTeach 

#historicalthinking

Lauren Hetrick
12
 

A Plane's Purpose

This learning lab will help aid the unit plan based on engineering and design. The learning lab "A Plane's Purpose" will be used during the first of three lessons in the unit plan. 

The first lesson is where the students will learn all about the functions and purposes of certain planes. This lab can be used during and after the lesson. When used during the lesson, the instructor can use it to provide information about the planes. After the lesson, students can refer back to it on their own to help them with research, details, or ideas. 

When using the learning lab during the lesson, make sure to go over each plane and what is was used for. The last plane in the learning lab should specifically be the Douglas C-47 because it is a plane that had a variety of uses. Emphasize that the way that the C-47 was designed, allowed it to be versatile, which is why design is important when the students begin their own. With the different images of the C-47, you can show how it is used differently in each mission. At the end of the lesson, go back and review the different aircrafts and what they were used for. You can also introduce other aircrafts that have other uses that were not mentioned in the lab.

 The purpose of the lab is to help students identify details that they might want to incorporate when designing their plane. 

Samantha Tufaga
6
 

A Right to the City

These items are housed in the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum and appear in the exhibit A Right to the City curated by Samir Meghelli.

"The history of Washington neighborhoods reveals the struggles of DC residents to control—or even participate in—decisions affecting where and how they live. Prior to passage of Home Rule in the 1970s, Congressmen, private developers, appointed members of the local government, and even sitting Presidents decided the course of the city’s development, often with little or no input from residents.  

In the mid-twentieth century, massive federal “urban renewal” projects, school desegregation, and major highways, both proposed and built, spurred civic engagement, protest, alternative proposals for development, and a push for self-government. By 1968, “White man’s roads through black man’s homes” became a rallying cry, pointing to the racism that afflicted the urban and suburban planning of the era.  

A Right to the City highlights episodes in the history of six neighborhoods across the city, telling the story of how ordinary Washingtonians have helped shape and reshape their neighborhoods in extraordinary ways: through the fight for quality public education, for healthy and green communities, for equitable development and transit, and for a genuinely democratic approach to city planning."


Kathy Carroll
31
 

A Shape-Note Singing Lesson

Shape-note singing is a tradition that began in the American South as a simple way to teach the reading of music to congregations. Each note head has a distinctive, easy-to-remember shape. What a great way, then, to introduce the reading of music to children!

In this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, "A Shape-Note Singing Lesson," you'll find a lesson plan and a background essay. Click the PDF icon to see the issue. Click the last box for audio samples of shape-note hymns from the Smithsonian Folkways archives.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

ABC Easy As 123

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the alphabet. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they wonder, and compare how they are alike and different. Families can check out alphabets and consider how each of the letters are designed. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

Abolitionists

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  

These resources - including portraits, articles, primary source documents, videos, and websites - highlight four abolitionists profiled in American Experience film The Abolitionists and the National Youth Summit on Abolition: William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown. Additional resources related to abolitionism and other important abolitionists are located at the end. When navigating this collection, please see the standalone text tiles for summaries of section resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Tags: civil war; slavery; underground railroad; african-american; national endowment for the humanities; #nhd; #NHD2017

Mike Greep
54
 

Aboriginal Melodies: a Look into the Music of Those Who Came Before

There were hundreds of different native communities, and with each, there was a distinct history, language, and musical culture. Musical culture played a vital role in the life of Native Americans. It was used for recreation, healing, expression, and ceremonial purposes.

Music was the foundation of Native American culture that worked its way into rituals, customs, and daily life. Much of the foundational personality and uniqueness of Native music that is known, originates from the instruments themselves, most notably, drums, rattles, and flutes/pipes.

Originating in the 1500's and ending in the 1700's Native Americans adopted and adapted many European instruments. However, before learning of the European instruments, the natives already had many of their own. Even though their instruments weren't as advanced as those of the Europeans, they had what they needed which were these beautiful percussive and woodland instruments. Still, when borrowing and adapting European instruments, the Native Americans managed to make these them their own by decorating them. 

Decorations would often have some sort of spiritual significance, or could oftentimes refer to sacred narratives. However, it is not only the decorations that tell stories. Usually, the names of the instruments themselves reflected some sort of symbolic significance. Also, some instruments are thought to be sentient and require special treatment. 

There are several techniques that are employed in making these instruments. One of the most abstract being the art that was often carved, painted or placed on these instruments. Some devices would take an hour or two to make and were able to be built by practically anyone in their tribe. However, some instruments were so complex that only certain tribe members could make them and it could take up to weeks to finish. 

Unlike the Europeans, instruments were much more than just instruments to the Native Americans, they were spiritual symbols and carried a lot of cultural significance for their individual tribes. 

Native Americans put a lot of work and effort into these devices, and even though they didn't have the modern tools and knowledge that we have today, they had what was necessary for their practices. 

Victoria Miranda
10
 

Abraham Lincoln

Lee Ann Mott
16
 

Abraham Lincoln: The Face of War

In lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, portraits of Lincoln introduce a study of the Civil War. An analysis of the portraits—including the famous “cracked-plate" photograph, two plaster “life masks," and an eyewitness drawing of Lincoln's arrival in the enemy capital of Richmond, Virginia—leads to an analysis of the times.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and larger images of the portraits.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
11
 

Abraham's Letters: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool Award.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
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