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Found 334 Collections

 

Back from the Brink: Black-Footed Ferrets

The westward expansion of the United States in the 19th century added millions of acres to our territory.  Thomas Jefferson stated "The fertility of the country, its climate and extent, promise in due season important aids to our treasury, an ample provision for our posterity, and a wide-spread field for the blessings of freedom."  Today, Americans still heavily depend on many resources and industries in the west.

However, with triumph often comes elements of tragedy.  Learn more about the black-footed ferret's brush with extinction through videos, images, and news articles.

#NHD2019 #NHD

Kristin Black
20
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Pittsburgh's History of Innovation in Science

This collection connects the 2019 National History Day theme of "Triumph and Tragedy in History" to a selection of topics related to Western Pennsylvania, science, and innovation. This region’s history features many stories of triumph over tragedy, including two key events: the creation of the polio vaccine at the University of Pittsburgh, and Rachel Carson’s fight against the detrimental effects of pesticides on the environment.

The first half of the collection focuses on the story of the polio vaccine, including context on the polio virus, movements to raise money for a cure, and Salk's work in Pittsburgh. It also mentions Henrietta Lacks, whose cells were used without permission for a range of medical advancements, including the polio vaccine.

The second half of the collection highlights Rachel Carson, her talent for writing and interest in animals as a child, how she came to be interested in the effects of DDT, and her legacy as an environmentalist. 

These objects, images, and sources can be used to help form an idea for a project, provide a new angle on an existing project idea, or lead to new ways of including primary sources into NHD projects. They are drawn from a range of primary source repositories, which can be helpful sources of information for students working on these topics. 

#NHD2019 #NHD 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
35
 

Snowflakes in Wilson A. Bentley's Collection

This topical collection includes images from Wilson A. Bentley's snowflake photography collection, which was donated to the Smithsonian in 1903. Bentley used a bellows camera that had a microscope inside to capture these small and unique natural objects. Also included in the collection is the original correspondence between Bentley and the Smithsonian, as well as ideas for using these sources in the classroom from the Smithsonian Institution Archives.

Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Design Case Study: Eone Bradley Timepiece

Explore the design story behind the Bradley Timepiece in Cooper Hewitt's collection and learn about empathy, creative problem solving, inclusive design, and the design process used to bring it to life.

Objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with the design process
  • Understand what the steps of the design process might look like in application 
  • Connect design objects to the design process

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
12
 

Flashcard Activity: Tools and Innovation

This collection traces innovation in various types of tools over time.  Approach in small groups or as a classroom to have students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative?  How do you define innovation? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button.  This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile). 

Keywords: invention, flash cards

Tess Porter
37
 

The Race to Space: Understanding the Cold War Context of the Apollo 11 Mission

By using this collection, learners will . . .

  • Use primary sources to understand a range of perspectives on the Space Race.
  • Understand why the United States was concerned about the Soviet space program.
  • Be able to analyze the Cold War era context of the Space Race and draw their own conclusions about the success of the Space Race.
HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
22
 

Mummies: Teaching Resources

This topical collection pulls together resources on mummification in multiple cultures. Resources cover reasons for mummification, different methods, and what can be learned by studying mummies. Includes Smithsonian Channel videos, fact sheets, objects, a student-targeted webcast, and articles. Areas explored include Ancient Egypt, South America, and Europe.

Keywords: egyptian, archaeology

Tess Porter
19
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Planet Series: Mercury

This assignment allows you to explore these aspects of Mercury:

  • Name
  • Location
  • Size
  • Atmosphere
  • Surface
  • Moons
  • Exploration

Many of the artifacts, videos, and images include questions that will help you better understand our solar system. 

HOW TO BEGIN:

Begin this activity by watching the first video about Mercury, which will help you answer questions throughout the collection.

Tags: Stars, Moons, Mythology

Christina Shepard
29
 

Scientists: What do they do?

Students, please scroll through the videos in order to learn about four areas of science with Smithsonian scientists: Earth science, Marine science, Animal science, and Space science. There is a Smithsonian online interactive in each section under learn more.

Tags: frogs, elephants, ocean, snails, dinosaur, leopard, elephant

Christina Shepard
26
 

Zoology Introduction: Observing Pandas

This lesson plan teaches innate and learned animal behavior by having students watch videos of Bao Bao, the Smithsonian National Zoo's panda, and answer questions about her behavior in the videos. The videos range from Bao Bao as a newborn to her first birthday and have quiz questions connected to them to help students better understand how to observe animal behavior. There is a hand out for students to read while watching the videos to better help them answer questions. There is also a chart attached that can be used by the teacher to write down the behavior of Bao Bao in each video in fifteen second increments. This teacher lesson plan can also be adapted to be used as a class assignment, if needed. 

Christina Shepard
13
 

Photograph Analysis: "Moon Man" Image of Buzz Aldrin

This topical collection includes the iconic "Moon Man" image of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, a National Air and Space Museum “expert annotation” video featuring a curator highlighting specific details, and other resources about the space suit and the Apollo 11 mission. 

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about the mission to the moon, for analysis of photographic details, or in biography projects about the astronauts.  

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

Solar System

Rosemary Herold
9
 

Senses Series - Sight in Humans and Animals

How do we see what we see? This collection is about seeing the world in unexpected ways through human innovations and animal adaptations. Meet a teen who invented a new way to see infrared, a visually impaired woman with a bionic implant, a shark whose eye is similar our own, a Giant Squid with the world's largest eyes, a mantis shrimp who sees many colors in all directions, and a nocturnal sweat bee who navigates the jungle in the dark. Learn about why human vision can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the eye and brain function together, and experiments to try. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of seeing from a Tibetan monastic Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of sight differ from your own? 

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
15
 

Senses Series - Hearing

How do we hear what we hear? This collection is about hearing the world in unexpected ways through human perspectives of science and culture, and animal adaptations. Meet a shark whose entire body is an ear; zoo otters who play the keyboard; rabbits whose large ear adaptations provide self-defense; and the reasons for a sea lion's bark. Learn about the structure and function of human ears can only see a certain type of light within the electromagnetic spectrum. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the ear and hearing functions work, as well as a sound experiments to try. The collections closes with a cross-cultural examination of hearing and function from Tibetan Buddhist monastics.

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
10
 

Senses Series - Smell

How do we experience the sense of smell? This collection explores the variety of human and animal smell experiences. Videos examine ants that use smell to communicate, orchid bee perfumery, and the unique smell adaptation of the maned wolf. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides the structure and function of the nose, as well as olfaction experiments. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from a Tibetan monastic Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of smell differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
9
 

Senses Series - Taste

How do we taste what we taste? This collection is about the kinds of tastes that the human tongue experiences. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides an overview of how the tongue and taste function. Included are experiments to try, as well as examples of the kinds of tastes: sweet, salty, sour, hot and bitter. The collection closes with a cross-cultural examination of tongue function and tastes from Tibetan monastics—who recognize thirty-six different tastes!

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
14
 

Senses Series - Touch

How do we experience the sense of touch? This collection explores the variety of human and animal touch experiences. From the characteristics of a variety of objects, to a video which examines the touch experience of tortoises and pandas... we all experience touch differently. Background information from the website Neuroscience for Kids provides touch experiments; an examination of pain and why it hurts, and the functionality of the body's largest organ—the skin. The collection concludes with a cross-cultural examination of touch from Tibetan monks' Buddhist perspective. How might their experience of touch differ from your own?

Based on exhibition project work through Science for Monks and The World of Your Senses Exhibition (2010).

Tracie Spinale
19
 

The Engineering Design Process

This collection of teaching resources includes lesson plans and multimedia resources about the engineering design process. There are several lesson plans on architecture and engineering concepts of design, such as simple shelters, balance, and materials. The videos and illustrations explain what engineers do and the fundamental engineering design process.

This lesson includes:

  • A video by Crash Course Kids titled "What's an Engineer? Crash Course Kids #12.1" (4:30)
  • A video by Crash Course Kids titled "The Engineering Process: Crash Course Kids #12.2" (5:17)
  • Two models of the Engineering Design Process by Preschool Steam
  • Engineering/architecture activities from the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum for Pre-Kindergarten-1st Grade
Christina Shepard
11
 

Science: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks!

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.
 

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Science See, Think, Wonder

This collection is meant to inspire a "See, Think, Wonder" exercise for Science Based Curriculum. All the images are science related, and designed to explore students' thinking about science topics and science in general.

Moriah Krafft
7
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 6-8 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
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