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Found 413 Collections

 

ACCESS SERIES | Nile, Nile Crocodile

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

Exploring: Ancient Egypt, the Nile River, and glass museum objects, papercraft, and sand art

Rationale for Instruction:

  • Through the introduction, museum visit, and activities, students connect with an ancient and diverse culture in ways both conceptual and concrete. The ancient Egyptians shaped our modern civilization in fundamental ways and left legacies that are still present today. 

Objectives:

  • Explain features of the daily life of an Ancient Egyptian living on the Nile River, including boat transportation, dress, and animal life. 
  • Explore the ancient origins of glass making in Egypt.
  • Examine how glass making relates to object making, animal representation, and the desert environment of Egypt
  • Plan, create, and share digital and physical works of art that represent ancient (sand art) and modern art forms (digital photography with filters) as well as representational art (papercraft) landscape.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Nile, Nile Crocodile" << CLICK HERE >>

SET THE STAGE:

  • Maps - Look at the maps in the Smithsonian collection; Where do you think you'll journey to in this collection?
  • "This is Sand" App - an tablet app that changes the pixels on the screen into digital sand.
  • Video about The Nile (for learners who prefer a concrete example)
  • Thought journey down the Nile River; Ask questions about observations along the way. If you are able to transform the furniture to reflect a boat, do so. 
  • Glass making video as well as a primary source text from 1904 (for learners who prefer a concrete example); Help make the connection between the desert sand environment and glass making. 

MUSEUM "VISIT"

  • Go to the gallery; read the panels and explore the objects. The gallery has been re-created in the Learning Lab collection
  • Explore the glass vessels-->What do you notice?
  • Observe the glass animals-->Take turns reading the informational texts; What do the animals represent?

~ BREAK ~

ACTIVITY STATIONS (rotate between activity stations)

  • SAND ART - Create your own ancient Egyptian glass vessel through a sand art design similar to the decorated glass in the museum.
  • "ANCIENT" PHOTOS - Use digital tablets to take photos in a museum gallery and use the built-in filters to create 'ancient-looking' photos like the ones that document historic museum excavations. 
  • PAPERCRAFT LANDSCAPE - Create a three-dimensional landscape of ancient Egypt based on the animals and structures observed in the museum gallery and in the introductory materials. Templates and examples are included. Document your results using photography.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
119
 

Gender

#SAAMteach

Cristi Marchetti
13
 

Argument & Art

Understanding what makes a text effective in terms of rhetorical strategies in increasingly important for students, especially as the ACT/SAT writing exams become more analytical. By pairing a visual stimulus with a somewhat abstract, difficult-to-place concept such as that of Rhetoric, students should be able to more wholly understand what comprises and defines each canon and be able to apply the canons to a broad range of texts, both traditional and contemporary. 

#SAAMteach

Kimberly Siemsen
12
 

Women and men who helped New York immigrates' living conditions during the 19th and early 20th century.

This collections shows men and women who helped change the living conditions of the immigrants that flooded into New York City during the 19th and 20th centuries. They changed the way people lived by shining a light on the poor living conditions of the newest Americans.  The following people are discussed in this collection: Lillian Wald, Jane Addams, Margaret Sanger, Jacob Riis, and Theodore Roosevelt.  The themes that are discussed are: tenement living, women's health, and immigrants. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019  Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach


leigh lewis
17
 

Jazz Resources for Preschool Students

Resources to support two year olds learning about jazz music and musicians. Includes portraits of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis. Students connect the musician to their instrument, identify the parts of a trumpet and listen to Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" to identify specific instruments in the song. Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center's blog includes an interview with the teacher who originally created and implemented the lesson. Included here are supporting resources of the elements mentioned in her interview.

#SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Irish Music

This collection includes a wide range of Irish contemporary and traditional music in the Smithsonian collections, with two lesson plans for grades 3-5 from the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

#SmithsonianMusic

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

Woody Guthrie: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Woody Guthrie, one of the most important folk composers in American history. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes multiple music recordings, a Smithsonian Magazine article about his legacy, and a podcast episode about his music and relationship with Smithsonian Folkways Recordings.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how he wanted to be seen, or how others wanted him to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened to his music, does the portrait capture your image of Woody Guthrie? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Guthrie, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, songwriter, oklahoma, protest, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
12
 

Esperanza Spalding: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Esperanza Spalding, a Grammy-winning jazz bassist and singer. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes a video of artist Bo Gehring speaking about his portrait of Spalding and a Smithsonian Magazine article about her curation of an exhibit at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read listened to her music, does the portrait capture your image of Esperanza Spalding? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Esperanza Spalding, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: musician, oregon, American, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
7
 

Selena: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Selena Quintanilla-Pérez, an American singer known as the "queen of Tejano music." Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes videos of educators and curators talking about her life and accomplishments, as well as an outfit she wore during performances.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened to her music, does the portrait capture your image of Selena? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Selena, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, texas, model, fashion designer, entertainer, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
8
 

Bessie Smith: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Bessie Smith, the "Empress of the Blues" and one of the most influential blues singers in history. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture. Also includes a video clip of Bessie Smith performing "St. Louis Blues" in 1929 and a post from the National Museum of African American History and Culture discussing her and other LGBTQ African Americans of the Harlem Renaissance.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how she wanted to be seen, or how others wanted her to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having listened her music, does the portrait capture your image of Bessie Smith? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Bessie Smith, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: singer, musician, 20s, 30s, American, Tennessee, #BecauseOfHerStory, #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
12
 

New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Planning Tool

Using a sample lesson "The Blues and The Great Depression" provided by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) as a model, this collection demonstrates how the Smithsonian Learning Lab can be a useful tool to curate digital resources that support a lesson for arts integration.

In this lesson, students will learn about the structure and content of the blues using songs from the 1930s and the Great Depression.Students will brainstorm circumstances of the Great Depression and use those ideas to create an original blues song from the point of view of someone living during the Great Depression.

Essential questions: 

● How does blues music reflect the challenges of poverty for the African-American experience during the Great Depression?
● How do images and songs reflect the emotions of the African-American experience during the Great Depression?


The original lesson was created by the New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) and included in their Arts Integration User Guide for NJ Educators and Practitioners, starting on p. 90 (http://njpsa.org/documents/EdLdrsAsSchol2018/artsintegrationWorkbook2018.pdf).

Ashley Naranjo
24
 

Compare/Contrast: Faith Ringgold and Jacob Lawrence

This collection includes self-portraits by two different artists: Faith Ringgold and Jacob Lawrence.  Both artists are generally known for their efforts to represent everyday life experiences, struggles, and successes of African Americans.  The purpose of the collection is to prompt a discussion comparing/contrasting each artist's content and media choice in the context of a self-portrait.  Students will be asked to reflect on stages of the artistic process in terms of artist intent, choice of media, and general content of a finished artwork.     

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  #NPGteach 

Liz List
16
 

Immigration & The Face of American Identity

This collection provides resources that can be used to introduce and discuss the following essential questions, as part of a larger "American Identity" literature-based unit:  

1) In what ways do immigrants change America?

2) What would America be like without immigrants?

3) How do immigrants' experiences contribute to a complex and multifaceted American Identity?

#SAAMteach

Joanna Dickinson
13
 

Mini Unit Recognizing the American Dream


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
10
 

Ethnic Studies: Identity

Resources for 9th Grade Ethnic Studies Unit on Identity (self and as part of a larger group). Who am I? Where do I come from? #SAAMTeach

Danielle Torrez
8
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
73
 

Environmental Advocacy through Art

This collection was designed to enable students to reflect deeply on their understanding of local and global human impacts on the planet and how they can inspire others to care about/collectively work to solve one of these issues.  Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to examine various pieces of environmental art before they create their own visual call to action focused on the environmental issue that they care most about.

Global Competency Connection:

  • This project was designed to be the culminating project in a high school Environmental Science class, thus it is the expectation that students have “investigated the world” as they explored environmental and social issues throughout the course.  
  • This project will incorporate a level of choice as students “communicate their ideas” on the environmental issue that resonated most with them.
  • As a part of the project, students will share their campaigns with their teachers, peers, and families, and through this awareness raising thus “take action” on issues of global significance.

Using the Collection: A detailed description of daily activities can be found within the "Lesson Sequence" document. Additionally, notes regarding the use of each Project Zero Thinking Routine are documented as annotations within each individual Thinking Routine tile and provide specific instructions on how align these routines with this collection.  

#GoGlobal #ProjectZero #EnvironmentalScience

Aleah Myers
37
 

A Morning in Damascus

This collection features a series of three independent activities around one singular portrait of Bayard Taylor (formally titled A Morning in Damascus) painted by Thomas Hicks, 1855.  Taylor was one of America's foremost and most popular travel writers of the mid to late 19th century.  

These activities were created for my Advanced Placement World History course to practice close reading skills as well as historical thinking skills.  The notations provided here are for teacher reference and would not be given to students. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2017 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGTeach 

#historicalthinking

Lauren Hetrick
12
 

When Marian Sang: Using Portraiture for Pre-reading and Post-reading Activities

In this collection, portraits are used for both pre-reading and post-reading activities in connection with reading a biography of Marian Anderson. The pre-reading activity uses Betsy Graves Reyneau's oil on canvas portrait, Marian Anderson, to begin to reveal Anderson to students. Post-reading activities include the use of photographs, video and William H. Johnson's oil on paperboard Marian Anderson to enhance understanding of Anderson's 1939 concert and to informally access student learning.  

When Marian Sang: The True Recital of Marian Anderson: The Voice of a Century is a picture book written by Pam Munoz Ryan and illustrated by Brian Selznick. This biography shares the story of opera star Marian Anderson's historic concert of 1939 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to an integrated crowd of over 75,000 people. The book recounts Marian's life as a she trains to become an opera singer and as she struggles with the obstacles she faces in pre-Civil Rights America. This picture book is an excellent choice to use in the upper elementary classroom in the context of a unit that focuses on "challenges and obstacles."

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach

Katie Oxnard
8
 

Smithsonian Pioneer: Solomon G. Brown

In 1852, Solomon G. Brown of Washington D.C. became the first African American employed by the Smithsonian Institution. He was an unusual man of his time, as he was a literate free person of color in Washington D.C., where slavery was legal until 1862. Additionally, Mr. Brown was an influential member of the African American community in Washington D.C, before and after the Civil War. For 54 years, Mr. Brown worked at the Smithsonian Institution in a variety of positions. He saw the institution change and grow. In 1902, the Smithsonian honored Mr. Brown for his time and service.

 This Learning Lab explores the experience of Solomon G. Brown and his work at the Smithsonian Institution. Exploring his career can highlight the complexities of slavery, freedom, race, and citizenship that African Americans experienced in Washington D.C. through the latter half of the nineteenth century, which included the late Antebellum Period, the Civil War, the Gilded Age and the beginnings of the Jim Crow Era. His life poses an interesting contrast to the more normative narratives of African Americans during the mid to late nineteenth century.

Discussion questions are included at the beginning of the Learning Lab.

 

Keywords: nmaahc, African American, Smithsonian, Institution, museum, castle, secretary, freedom, slavery, Washington D.C. DC, district, Columbia, research, pioneer, Solomon, Brown, first, civil war, antebellum, reconstruction, Jim Crow, 19th century, 20th century

NMAAHC Education
23
 

Symbolism and Self-Portraiture Like Kehinde Wiley

After using the "Seven Ways to Look at a Portrait" strategy, students create self-portraits in the style of Kehinde Wiley that incorporates study symbolism, self-identity narrative, and reflection on the poses of traditional American portraiture. This lesson requires access to computer technology, a camera (mobile phone is fine), a green screen background, a green screen phone app or program, and ideally a printer.

Amy Leserman
16
 

Harlem Renaissance: Style and Subject

This collection is meant to be used as an introductory activity to the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Specifically, it focuses on the different styles employed by artist Aaron Douglas, most notably in his Scottsboro Boys portrait and in his 1925 self-portrait. In doing so, it asks students to consider when and why an artist who is more than capable of creating within the boundaries of classically beautiful art or writing might chose to create in this style at some times and at other times to create in more radical or avante-garde styles. It uses a Compare and Contrast looking technique before revealing to students that all four distinct pieces are created by the same artist. 

Ideally, teachers can end the unit by facilitating discussion of the social change Douglas aims for with his Scottsboro portrait and of the bridge that Hurston creates with her prose narrator before launching into the dialect of her characters that earned her such scorn from the African American community of her era.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Lindsay Van Loon
11
 

Gilded Age Industrialists v. The Founding Fathers Portrait Battle (and Analysis)

#NPGteach

DESCRIPTION:
This collection/lesson is designed to compare and evaluate portraiture of Gilded Age Industrialists and of the Founding Fathers. Students will explore different mediums of portraiture and attempt to place these examples of artwork into the legacy that Gilded Age Industrialists hoped to create for themselves. This lesson plan involves close analysis of specific portraits of Andrew Carnegie, a sorting activity, a Google Doc graphic organizer to help students inquire information, and some overarching discussion and analysis questions to help foster class discourse. Each of the sources used in this collection are owned by the National Portrait Gallery, and many - as of 6/27/19 - are currently on display.  Some questions to consider as you and/or your students peruse this collection: What does it mean to have a legacy? How are portraiture and legacy connected or related to each other? Why, in an era when photography is en vogue, would an individual choose to have a painting done of them? What would you want a portrait of you to look like?


Lesson Overview: (See Collection or the link below for Full Google Doc Lesson Plan)

https://docs.google.com/docume...

CLASS (SUBJECT & LEVEL): High School American History - for an 80 minute block

LESSON OBJECTIVE(S): 

  • Students will closely analyze Gilded Age industrialist portraits in both painting and photograph formats, attempting to understand the legacy that these leaders were trying to create for themselves in the future.
  • Students will compare and contrast portrayals of Gilded Age industrialists and the Founding Fathers.
  • Students will argue different ideas about portraiture in U.S. History and reach their own conclusions.

CONTENT:  Gilded Age Industrialists, Founding Fathers, Portraits and Photos, Source Analysis


This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Tyler Hanson
27
 

Who creates identity?

This activity will be used to reinforce close reading and analysis of visual text in either a pop culture unit or an identity unit in AP English Language and Composition. The idea is to examine how iconic popular images can be remixed to create new meaning and conversation about identity. 

The collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Cheryl Chambliss
10
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