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Found 624 Collections

 

The NHD at NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2018: Conflict and Compromise in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture Collection Grid for the 2018 NHD Theme!

Below are some documents, images, objects and videos to help you explore the 2018 NHD theme: Conflict and Compromise in History. These documents, images, objects and videos are intended to help highlight the African American experience and perspective in American and international history.

These documents, images, objects and videos may help you form an idea for a project topic or they may help to expand the narrative of your selected project. Click on the text icon for possible project connections, questions to help with analysis, creative activities,  and/or the paper clip icon to reveal questions or comments to spark your curiosity.

#NHD2018 #NHD

National Museum of African American History and Culture
75
 

NHD at NMAAHC Collection Connection Grid 2019: Triumph and Tragedy in History

Welcome to the National Museum of African American History and Culture's Collection Connection Grid for National History Day 2019!

Below is an assortment of selected documents, images, objects and videos that highlight the African American experience in relation to the 2019 NHD theme: Triumph and Tragedy in History. Use these items as inspiration for a project topic, or use the items to help expand your research on a topic you have already selected.  This collection is designed to be self-guided by students and educators participating in National History Day.

 #NHD2019

Keywords: African American, NMAAHC, National History Day, NHD, Collection, Connection, Grid, triumph, tragedy, history, project, topic, ideas, 2019

National Museum of African American History and Culture
96
 

Exploring Solar Power at NMAAHC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its use of renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. One of the ways NMAAHC is using renewable energy is through the use of solar panels on its roof. Although the solar panels are not visible to our visitors, they produce enough energy to power 11 average-sized U.S. homes for a year.

Use this activity to engage your students in a lesson covering solar power, electricity, and the factors that affect its production. 

Keywords: solar, power, STEM, science, LEED, environment, energy, NMAAHC, African American, National Mall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
18
 

The Corona's Cooling Power

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its construction using renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. To minimize energy use, the architects and engineers designed the building to allow lots of natural light inside of the museum. The Corona, the ornamental bronze-colored metal lattice that covers the museum like a crown covers a head, helps to keep the museum cool by allowing some sunlight inside, but by blocking the rest. As a result, the museum uses less electricity for lights and air conditioning. 

But how does it work? Have your students complete the following experiment to find out!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
15
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This is a project for my online US history class. Which is about certain artifacts in the 1920s-30s.

ally northrup
10
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical American frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the native plant, ginseng, through this collection and series of activities. 

Daniel Boone (1734-1820) spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness. Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant American ginseng. He rose to the status of American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources to the market. The legend of Daniel Boone and his-lost-ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact. But become exaggerated or distorted through many generations of story tellers, and, now, via the internet. History and fiction become intertwined. 

While the days of American pioneers are long gone, people still search for and gather wild ginseng in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. Be sure to click the Information icon to learn more about each item. 

To learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the Learning Lab collection -The Wilderness Road- .

Julia Eanes
25
 

Portraiture and the Rhetorical Triangle

Subject: AP Language, Rhetorical Analysis

This collection features portraits (some that can be used for comparing and contrasting) for studying and practicing usage of the rhetorical triangle.  Students may also SOAPSTone the images.  

Objectives:

  • Students will observe different portraits.
  • Students will analyze different portraits using the rhetorical triangle.  
  • Students will recall lessons from history to apply background knowledge to the analysis.  

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  

#NPGTeach



Mai Khanh Nguyen
16
 

Suffrage Pin: Object Analysis

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity explores the struggle of suffragists during the American suffrage movement through deep analysis of one object - a pin, worn by suffragist Alice Paul, in the shape of a jail door with a heart-shaped lock. Pins such as these were given in a ceremony to suffragists who were imprisoned as a result of the 1917 pickets. Includes the pin, an article discussing the history behind the pin, and multiple photographs suffragist picketers.

Keywords: women's rights, suffrage, suffragette, protest, reform, civil rights, equal rights, alice paul, jailed for freedom, pin, national women's party, nwp, voting, vote

Tess Porter
6
 

Pioneers from the East: The Sing Family

This collection is comprised of archival content from the Austin History Center and KLRU's Austin Revealed: Pioneers from the East project. This collection features the Sing family, one of three of the first Chinese families in Austin. It explores topics of citizenship, migration, immigration, naturalization, interracial marriage, preserving history, and Asian American history.

#TCSAARC 

#EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
26
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
 

Collection of Perceptions

This collection was made as a project for a Bachelors and Liberal Studies course.  The project is an exhibit of different pictures of angels that represent a form of hope in this collection. We know angels as the protectors of the universe and I selected them for this project to represent those who require protection or will require assistance throughout their lives. 

The categories are the Protectors, The Needy, and The Harmed.  The Needy are the images who appear to be silenced by their medical restraints. No-one has noticed their pain.  The Harmed are the pictures that show African American leaders that were assassinated. They were no angels and although the men were critically protected their lack of protection contributed to their death. Those men were not angels. 

The Protectors in this exhibit are the angels that we can and cannot see. The angel images within the rooms we hope and believe them to be within. 

Daliah Bryant
14
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Naomi Manzella
6
 

Storytelling Training: Brainstorming and Going into the Field

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Unlike the other Storytelling Training courses where information is given to you, you'll be asked to contribute ideas for your own potential story in this course. There's no right or wrong answers here. It's a way to help you start planning. Remember to make a copy of this collection first if you want your answers to be saved so you can revisit them!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
12
 

Storytelling Training: Creating Your Story

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Ready to start developing your story? In this short course, you'll get some tips on how to create a story board, writing a non-fiction script, and more. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
27
 

Storytelling Training: What is Cultural Storytelling?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this short online course, you'll learn about what we call "cultural storytelling" and  what the value of cultural storytelling is to society at large. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
16
 

Storytelling Training: What Makes a Great Story?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this course, you'll  learn about the parts that make stories compelling, especially non-fiction narratives which are unique stories grounded in real-life perspectives and history. Explore how your story can be both personal and research-based at the same time. Even documentaries start with a script!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Civil Rights: One Act - The 1968 Olympics

I created this small collection for my students to consider the roles of each individual in this photograph. When they engaged in the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine many of them wanted to know more about the white man wearing a medal and why he wasn't raising his fist. They generated many additional questions around this idea. I added the ESPN video to help the think more about the photo and its meaning. We had a class discussion that revisited their questions from the day before.

Ellen Rogers
8
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth.

In an upcoming exhibition, titled Men of Change: Power. Triumph. Truth., African American changemakers will be highlighted to illustrate their outstanding legacy and contributions. These individuals are icons often rendered invisible by a country, yet uplifted by a major culture. The following images showcase the legacy of men and women featured in the exhibition, illuminating their greatest works, interactions with the community, and so forth. Ever individual, whether featured in the exhibit or Learning Lab, affirm the power of the African American journey and, ultimately, the American experience. 

As you navigate throughout this Learning Lab, take notice of the various sections the Men of Change are divided into; such as Storytellers, Myth-breakers, Fathering, Community, Imagining, Catalysts and Loving.

#NHD2020

#BreakingBarriers

Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
70
 

Climates of Inequality: Design Interventions

Humanities Action Lab (HAL), currently hosted by Rutgers University-Newark (RU-N), is a coalition of universities, issue organizations, and public spaces, that collaborate to produce community-curated public humanities projects on urgent social issues. HAL’s current project, Climates of Inequality, explores climate and environmental justice in 23 localities around the world. RU-N's Graphic Design | Senior Seminar I partners with the Newark iteration, focusing on the (current) Newark Water Crisis.

Student are asked to respond to the escalating public health crisis— elevated levels of lead in Newark’s water. How can we, as designers, assist in this conversation? Teams design participatory experiences to engage Newark residents and RU-N students in order to create awareness about the crisis. Projects may include collecting and visualizing data, an action (prompted by elements of a campaign), a toolkit, among other design tactics. These projects are prototyped in support of the Climates of Inequalities exhibition at Express Newark, opening October 3, 2019.


This learning labs collection focuses on the design process and research components, that introduce the public rhetoric surrounding the 2019 Newark Water Crisis. Design students, investigate the social, historic and political contexts surrounding the crisis, study various sources of news media coverage and focus their research and engagement approaches based on conversations with Newark residents affected by the lead contamination, the RU-N student body, as well as community individuals and organizations working to manage the crises, raise awareness and proposing solutions.

In addition to media coverage and community insights, student investigate creative methods for public engagement, participatory and experience design examples, public art intervention to reference materials/media, communication strategies, language, a visual expression/solutions. 

The design process focuses on the human-centered design (HCD) model, but is rooted in self-reflection, to sensibly define the designer’s role in this conversation before proposing design interventions. The process also considers the "launch" of the project part of the "testing" phase, and involves reflection, before refining and re-packaging their design approaches.

Additional resources in this collection offer design project examples, ethnographic research approaches/definitions (ways to engage the audience), HCD & Design-Thinking resources, and more. 


DESIGN PROCESS 

FORMULATE: Frame the challenge. Research and Ideate.
+ Understand the challenge based on the project brief, scope, timeline and initial information provided. Ideate and research further to explore directions/angles of the challenge. 
+ Involve self reflection. What is the designer’s role in this conversation. From where you stand (your background, affiliations, skills) what can you do/make? How can you help? 
+ (RE)Frame the challenge.  

EMPATHIZE & DEFINE: Understand the User/Audience
+ Observe the Audience/Stakeholders/Community. 
+ Collect stories. 
+ Examine the larger picture: human needs, barriers & constraints. Define and shape your approach to the challenge.

BRAINSTORM: Diverge and Converge
The design thinking process is ultimately a divergent and convergent thinking process. Through the exercises of evaluation, comparison, and consolidation, a limited number of solutions are selected for prototyping and testing. The final solution sometimes merges the merits of several alternatives.” —Jasper Liu
+ Based on intellectual & experiential understanding of the challenge (Divergence), map the problem and define approach for your intervention (convergence). What is the right solution? 
+ Ideate forms of engagement. Create valuable, compelling and educational experiences for others. How is the medium relevant and accessible, to best communicate-with, educate and/or empower the audience? 

PROTOTYPE: Bring Ideas to Life
There are no perfect solutions, only trade-offs. Iterations are indispensable.”  —Jasper Liu
+ Generate an abundance of rough and rapid visuals to test, transform, and polish. 
+ Gauge final design directions based on feedback.
+ Produce well executed/functional prototypes for soft launch.

TEST/LAUNCH: Learn and Refine – Share with User
+ Produce all required artwork (prepped for print and/or digital formats). 
+ Test design & document interactions.
+ Gather findings and articulate effectiveness or non-fulfillment.

REVISE & RE-LAUNCH:
+ Revise project, perfect, re-produce for travel.  
+ Measure Impact


FACULTY

Chantal Fischzang
Assistant Professor
Department of Arts, Culture & Media
Rutgers University-Newark

Co-Director
Design Consortium
Visual Means

+

Rebecca Pauline Jampol
Visiting Professor
Department of Arts, Culture & Media
Rutgers University-Newark

Co-Founder & Co-Director
Project for Empty Space



#socialengagementdesign 
#socialImpactdesign
#humancentereddesign
#designforgood
#articipatorydesign
#publicengagement
#experiencedesign
#ethnographicresearch
#awarenesscampaign
#designinterventions




Chantal Fischzang
29
 

chairs

sketches, designs, prototypes and finished chairs

Louise Brady
22
 

Character & Setting

This collection focuses on exploring characters and settings, as well as how the two can be used together for a specific purpose. I used this collection to demonstrate to students how characters and settings impact one another.

#PZPGH

C.Harris
6
 

Artist Trading Cards: Database

In this collection, students will explore  artists from modern and contemporary eras. Students will choose one artist to learn more about using the links provided. Students will research the history in connection with the chosen artist and describe their work. Students will then create 4 trading cards about their chosen artists, with images in the style of the artist. 

Collection includes artwork by the following artists: El Anatsui, Andy Warhol, Dorothea Lange, Monet, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, Nick Cave, Yinka Shonibare, Wayne Thiebaud, Mary Cassat, Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Mies van der Rohe, Kehinde Willey, Amy Sherald, Ansel Adams, Ran Hwang, Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze, Rusell Crotty, Jasper Johns, Romare Bearden, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mondrian, Seurat,  Calder, Donald Judd,  Sol Lewitt, and Roy Lichtenstien.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: art history, trading cards, modern, contemporary,

Rebecca Beaird
135
 

Breaking Barriers: Examining the Life and Work of Isamu Noguchi

This topical collection of resources can be used as a brainstorming tool to support student research on the National History Day 2020 theme of Breaking Barriers in History. This collection focuses on primary sources on the life and work of artist and designer Isamu Noguchi.

Isamu Noguchi (November 17, 1904 - December 30, 1988) was a Japanese American artist, landscape architect, and designer. Noted for merging Western and Eastern influence, Noguchi expanded the definition of sculpture with creations that ranged from portraiture and abstract sculpture to graceful meditation gardens and sprawling landscapes. Drawing distinction between art and design, Noguchi also created furniture, theater sets, and other functional objects that demonstrated his desire to incorporate sculpture into daily life. On May 18, 2004, Noguchi was honored by the United States Postal Service with the release of five stamps depicting his work at a ceremony in Long Island City, New York. The selvage (edge of the sheet) also includes a photograph of the artist taken in 1952 and his quote, "Everything is sculpture. Any material, any idea without hindrance born into space, I consider sculpture."

#NHD #NHD2020

Tag: Isamu Noguchi, sculpture, sculptor, stamp, design, furniture, World War II, Japanese American

National Postal Museum
45
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