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Found 947 Collections

 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

All Access Digital Arts Camp (plans and activities for teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities)

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens.

Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill-building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections.

At the Access Summer Camp workshops, teens learn to tell their own stories through digital arts and media. They focused on a specific story to tell based upon their interests. Content for their artistic self-expressions took the form of printed digital portraits and “sonic self-portrait” digital music compositions, as well as documentary iMovies. Teens toured Smithsonian museums, visited exhibitions and interviewed curators and educators, as well as conducted internet research. Teens ate lunch together and socialized during game breaks. Volunteers worked with teens to provide individual supports and facilitate the experience. Smithsonian educators and neurotypical teen youth mentors guided Access teens to edit their content using photo, sound, and movie editing software.   The movies, portraits, and songs premiered at the Hirshhorn Museum’s ARTLAB+ for family and friends, with teens themselves providing introductory remarks for their artworks. Each teen received a certificate of completion, a digital copy of their artwork, and a framed self-portrait. An evaluation session on the final day of the workshops allowed teens to express their thoughts to the workshop organizers. 

Tracie Spinale
3
 

Alison Bechdel

Lehrer's multi-media portrait of acclaimed cartoonist and graphic novelist , Alison Bechdel, is an engaging image. I envision that it could help facilitate a lively discussion and inspire an exploration of self-identity with students at the secondary level in the visual as well as the language arts.

Riva Lehrer's interest in figuration and portraiture stems from living with a visible and significant disability. "Being stared at, and looking back, has colored my work for twenty years. Most of my collaborators have been people with impairments, visible or not. Some have no impairments but qualify for other reasons. We start with long interviews, in order to get a strong narrative sense of the relationship between their body and their life." Lehrer started this portrait of graphic novelist Alison Bechdel while Bechdel was working on Are You My Mother, a follow-up to her memoir, Fun Home. Bechdel provided a full-scale drawing of her mother, which Lehrer then transferred onto paper with blue acrylic. Lehrer says the portrait "grew out of discussions about being haunted by a lost parent, and [the awareness] that one's mother is the ultimate mirror of the self for a daughter."

Alison Bechdel (the sitter)
Riva Lehrer (the artist)
Chicago, IL
2011
Charcoal, mixed media, and 3-D collage on paper
Sandy Hindin Stone
Tammy French
1
 

Albert Bierstadt and the Lure of the West

Easterners heard many stories about the dangers of traveling to the American west. Accounts of the great American desert as an almost impossible place to cross caused many to rethink leaving home. Albert Bierstadt and painters of the Hudson River School traveled the west and sent back their impressions of the landscape and wildlife.

Arthur Glaser
13
 

Alaska Native Territories

Alaska is home to over 100,000 Indigenous residents who represent twenty distinctive cultures and languages. The map shows cities, towns and villages where most people live today, but depicts Alaska Native territories as they existed in about 1890, before the main influx of Euro-American settlers. 

Map information is courtesy of Michael Krauss, Igor Krupnik, Ives Goddard and the Alaska Native Language Center (University of Alaska Fairbanks). Map courtesy of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center.

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska
1
 

Akhenaton: The Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution.

I am here to learn the history through music and culture.  I like the contemporary classic and jazz music because class and jazz music have long histories that represent the cultures at that time and we appreciate and analyze about the emotions of the people in that time.

The purpose of this collection is to show how “The powerful leaders of greatest civilization” who changed the direction of existing Religion, culture, history and art as per their beliefs. This collection is part one of that that I have organized, chronologically, on Akhenaton: The Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution. The other two collections are " Alexander the Great: The Greek Conqueror and Cultural blender" and Octavian Augustus: The Roman Emperor "The illustrious one". It is my hope that these collections will help viewers to understand influential power of world’s ancient leaders in the field of Art and Culture.

The works of art is close to some of the spiritual quest and questions the civilizational future. The look of ancient art allows us to develop our ability to look at the world. It leads to searching for the deep meaning of each thing. In every era and every context, art has always been a forerunner of culture and civilization.

My hope is that this collection will exemplify No other, in more than three millennia of ancient Egypt, has left so controversial a trace as Akhenaton. Reigning at the height of Egyptian power, the Pharaoh, considered heretical, triggered a veritable cultural and religious revolution that still fascinates today with its audacity and its mysteries. My main sources of study were Arts and Culture: An Introduction to the Humanities, and the Smithsonian Lab.

It is my hope that these collections will help to understand the pharaoh power and influence over their art. Culture and even religious beliefs

The notion of art includes the creations of the man who express his sensitive point of view of the world, real as well as imaginary, whether through sculptures, linguistic or sound resources. Art is born with a ritual or magic function and has evolved thus becoming aesthetic or even recreational.

Pharaoh Akhenaton takes power in 1353 BC, and breaks with centuries of tradition. During his seventeen years of rule, he imposed new artistic and architectural styles, and celebrated the sun god Aton, at the expense of ancient deities.

The once heavily regulated proportions and artistic poses become more flexible: artisans can create realistic and graceful scenes of the natural world, and even portray Akhenaton and his wife, Nefertiti, in unusual and intimate poses. The royal couple is thus often represented kissing and caressing their daughters. One scene goes as far as figuring the king and the queen preparing to share their bed. The representation of Akhenaton's features seems destined to impress the viewer: massive jaws, drooping lips and stretched eyes of ineffable strangeness.

Forgotten for millennia, Akhenaton was rediscovered only at the end of the nineteenth century, and it will still take several decades to understand its history. He is generally recognized as one of the pioneers of monotheism, long before the "book religions".

#AHMCFall2019

Ju Young Lee
7
 

AIM and BPP

The following collection acts as a supplemental resource for the Power of the People: Intersectionality of the American Indian Movement and the Black Panther Party 12th grade lesson plan. 

Kenlontae' Turner
65
 

Aiko Garcia-Xelhuantzi 1920s and the 1930s Artifacts

Purpose of the project is to discover further into these two important time periods.

Aiko Garcia-Xelhuantzi
10
 

AIA: Art Challenging Urban Single Stories: Part 1

Overview
By using Chimamanda Adichie's "The Dangers of a Single Story" as a lens, students will begin to analyze how urban artists draw awareness to single stories and challenge them through their artwork. 

Topics and Hashtags
Urban Art, Stereotypes, Art, Social Action, Social Justice, Cities, City, Down These Mean Streets, Maristany #SAAMteach

Abi Wilberding
12
 

African rock art images - plants and leaves

This collection allows you to explore the various plant characteristics using African rock art images as data. The images include both rock art images and images of plant fossils. Use the accompanying exploration guide available on www.visibilityinstem.com to explore the plant images. For some of these images you will have to go directly to the site in order to see the images of plants at the bottom of the image. 

Catherine Quinlan
28
 

African Drums; the Heartbeat of Our Culture

A collection depicting and describing different African Drums and their significance in African culture  as well as the African diaspora. Please enjoy a look at the heartbeat of our culture.

By Zuri Houston and Malik Miller 

Zuri Houston
11
 

African Diaspora

Christina Ratatori
12
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
73
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
 

african architecture

Michelle Nguyen
5
 

African American History Month Resources

These classroom resources from different Smithsonian museums focus on African American history and culture. 



Tag: Black History 

Philippa Rappoport
25
 

African American History Month Family Festival: Interviews, Performances, Highlights

This collections comes from a African American History Month family festival created to complement the exhibition, "The Black List." Included here are a gallery tour with curator Ann Shumard, and interviews with puppeteer Schroeder Cherry, guitarist Warner Williams, the Taratibu Youth Association Step Dance Group, silhouette artist Lauren Muney and collage artist Michael Albert.

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

African American Artists and Ancient Greek Myth: Teacher's Guide

This teacher's guide explores how myths transcend time and place through three modern paintings by African American artists, who reinterpret Ancient Greek myth to comment on the human experience. Collection includes three paintings and a lesson plan published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which includes background information on myths and artists, as well as activity ideas. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey.' The video details his artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
5
 

African American Art: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, The most notorious poet in 18th century America was an enslaved teenager you've never heard of. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
56
 

Activity Collection: CUPCARS!

The Smithsonian and Lenovo want to inspire you to tinker! In this collection, you will learn how to create your very own CUPCAR! Follow steps two through five to create a balloon-powered cupcar, and steps six through eleven to create a motor-powered cupcar. 

Some steps have a yellow “paper clip” icon in the top left corner of the browser. Clicking this icon will reveal extra “Pro-Tips” for helping you build your cupcar.

Once your cupcar is moving, get creative! Try different placements of the parts for more efficiency. Decorate the outside with decals and markers. Race it with your friends!

Dawn Quill
20
 

Achelous and Hercules: What makes you say that?

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will examine the 1947 mural "Achelous and Hercules," by Thomas Hart Benton. This artwork explores the relationship between man and water in post-war agricultural America through the retelling of an Ancient Greek myth. Collection includes a video analysis by a museum director and an interactive exploring areas of interest in the artwork.

Tags: greece; agriculture; agricultural; missouri river; marshall plan; truman; cultural connections; midwest

Tess Porter
4
 

Access Series: Places "Real" and "Imagined"

This topical collection of artworks is based upon a wide variety of places and travel spots, both "real" and "imagined." It features castles, mountains, beaches, forests, capital cities, and fantasy movie landscapes. It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Students were asked about famous places they have visited or would want to visit, as well as favorite vacation or travel spots. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "If you could travel anywhere, where would you go, and who would you travel with, etc...?" Use the visible thinking routine "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
72
 

Access Series: Photo Quest in a Sculpture Garden

Get out on a sunny day and enjoy an art sculpture garden with friends...Wander with a purpose. In this teen group quest, teams use close-up photo prompts to find artworks in a sculpture garden, and then use tablet devices to take team photos with the sculptures. This activity was originally used in the Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. with the All Access Digital Arts Program as a photo scavenger hunt. Example PDFs of photo details are provided. To turn the photo hunt into a more formal learning experience, the answer section shows the entire sculpture with information and discussion prompts to elicit questions about teen identity and self-expression.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
33
 

Access Series: People, Friends, and Family--Together and Alone

This topical collection of people—together in groups with friends or families (mother, father, sister, brother, aunt, uncle, cousin, grandmother, and grandfather); different genders, ages, and ethnicities, and "selfies"—was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.

Tags: decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, disability, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
134
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