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Found 6,064 Collections

 

Maps as Story: Analyzing Thematic Development Using Visual Maps

Students will "read" and analyze elements such as conflict, symbolism, mood, and tone in order to interpret a visual map's message or story.  

Rosalyn Greene
14
 

Recognizing the American Dream Lesson


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
6
 

Women and men who helped New York immigrates' living conditions during the 19th and early 20th century.

This collections shows men and women who helped change the living conditions of the immigrants that flooded into New York City during the 19th and 20th centuries. They changed the way people lived by shining a light on the poor living conditions of the newest Americans.  The following people are discussed in this collection: Lillian Wald, Jane Addams, Margaret Sanger, Jacob Riis, and Theodore Roosevelt.  The themes that are discussed are: tenement living, women's health, and immigrants. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019  Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach


leigh lewis
17
 

The Arrival of the Americans and the end of Edo Japan - Post Assessment Activity

This collection serves to end the unit on Edo Japan and retake the discussion of how the period fits within the greater scene of world history. In our class, seclusion and openness of countries is an common through line, and so the arrival of the Americans effectively ending the Sakoku period is an important historical milestone. The main goal of this collection is to lead students into this dialectical reflection of how these two countries interacted and what this meant for a Japan that had consciously shut down most trade relations.  The opening lesson on Edo Japan puts in doubt how closed the country really was; this last lesson highlights how Edo Japan had evolved since the edict of 1635, and how it had to open its ports and face the conjunctions of the 19th century's international scene. 

This collection also brings into light reactions on both sides of the American arrival. Images and archives from both Japanese, as well as American witnesses, allow students to understand the motivations coming from East, as well as the West. 


Lesson plan (2 hours) 

1. Provide the students with the resources "4c United States-Japan Treaty single." "Black Ships and Samurai," "Founding Fragments - Commodore Perry," and "Matthew Calbraith Perry." Allow students time to browse at least two topics from the website and play the video "Founding Fragments - Commodore Perry" for the entire class. 

2. Using all the resources in Step 1, lead class through the visible thinking routine "True for who?" While completing this routine, highlight how each country struggles to defend their views. 

At the end of this unit, students have a fairly strong understanding of Japanese national interests. For this reason, the teacher can help provide information of the U.S.'s international stance during the 19th century. While the U.S. plays a background role in our curriculum, we do a quick mention of the Manifest Destiny and the Monroe Doctrine, as ways in which the students’ own country emulate cycles of international openness or seclusion. Following this through line, it is necessary to stress the arrival of Commodore Perry to Japan as a thematic intersection. The moment marks both the end of Edo period for Japan, and the United States’ efforts to expand their field of influence.

3. Allow students time to read further into the "Black Ships and Samurai" website. Students can also conduct quick research on the arrival of the Americans in 1853, and Japanese-American relations previous to this date.

4. Provide students a copy of Commodore Perry and President Fillmore's letter to the Emperor of Japan. Use resource "Letters of the Commodore Perry and President Fillmore to the Emperor of Japan (1852-1853)"  Do a close reading of the letters and highlight the main passages. 

5. Present the remaining images and complete a visible thinking routine "Parts/People/Interactions." Allow students to cite the letters in Step 4, as well as the images in this collection. At the end of this lesson, students are able to compare, as well as to question each country’s discourse of seclusion or non-intervention.

Denise Rodriguez
12
 

First impressions about Japan - PreAssessment activity

This collection serves as a pre-assessment activity to a unit on Edo Japan. The artwork in the module is heavily influenced by the Edo period. The goal of this short lesson is to activate imagery and ideas of Japanese art during the Edo period. 


Lesson plan (<1 hour)

Complete *ONE of the following activities:

1. Use the resource "One Step, First Step, Apple Computer, Osaka, Japan" to lead a "Think/Puzzle/Explore" routine. 

2. Use all four resources of the Japan Railway Company to complete a "See/Think/Wonder" visible thinking routine. 

3. Use either "How Japan Does It" or "MacDonald's Hamburgers Invading Japan/Tokyo Ginza Shuffle" to lead the "3-2-1 Bridge" visible thinking routine. 


*For all three routines: 

As you complete the routine, evaluate how much students already know about Japan and the lexicon that they use. Highlight key concepts written in the routine's poster. What do students know and how do these artifacts corroborate or oppose their initial ideas of Japan? Can students discern the historical nature behind some of these ads and posters? For instance, the railway ad displays a screen, and the poster for ‘How Japan Does It’ has a heavy ukiyo-e influence. In this way, these examples of commercial art tie in lasting impressions of a culture with contemporary takes on the country in a fun way. 

These three routines could also be completed in unison. Divide the class in smaller groups, provide each group with the images of the collection, and guide each group through one of the routines listed. The result as a class will be a much richer lexicon bank. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
 

Education Trunk: Basque Music and Dance

This collection supports the Educational Trunk outreach program provided by the Basque Museum & Cultural Center. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
9
 

Basque Immigration

Explore Basque Immigration and Diaspora. 

BasqueMuseumBoise
9
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Rose Krieg
6
 

Games in the Spanish Classroom

This collection is designed for kids to have fun while learning Spanish.  Students will engage  with the following guiding questions: ¿Por qué te gusta jugar? Why do you like to play? ¿Cómo te ayuda un juego a aprender español? How does playing a game help you learn Spanish? This collection contains a guide on how to play the games, game rules, and videos.  This collection can be use as part of an unit or can be activities to support  other units.

#LearnWithTR

Elizabeth Dilone
16
 

El Carnaval -Learning Spanish through Culture

This collection is designed to help student explore Spanish Culture through the carnival which is celebrated in  most Spanish speaking countries. Also, students will be able to compare Spanish carnival with any similar celebration in their own culture.  This collection can be use as part of the Spanish heritage month or a separate unit.  In this collection you can find a lesson plan with thinking routines in English and Spanish as well as worksheets, photos, videos, and songs. 

#LearnWithTR

Elizabeth Dilone
22
 

Mythologizing America

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine a set of 1860s era renderings of the major events of the American Revolution and consider what story these images were intended to tell about the creation of America. Students are expected to compare and contrast the images with their gained knowledge of major historical events to consider what goals a creator may have had in creating this particular set of images and whether or not these images fairly portray the founding story. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • How can we interpret events to accurately retell history? 
  • When is an interpretation of history "fair"? 
  • What tools can creators use to convey meaning when retelling history? Why might they choose to present a certain perspective? 

Standards: 

  • 4.8.5. Identify the views, lives, and influences of key leaders during this period (e.g., King George III, Patrick Henry, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams).
  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.


#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
8
 

Scurlock Studios

This is a collection of mostly portraits attributed to Scurlock Studios in the early and mid 20th century.  The collection can be used as the basis for a one day lesson that touches on both famous African Africans in the 20th century and an interesting aspect of local, Washington DC  history.  

The Guiding Questions for the lesson are:

- Why was photography such an important medium in the 20th century?

- How did Scurlock Studios benefit not only the African American community in DC, but also African Americans throughout the country?

The Big Idea of the lesson is:

The way people and events are depicted in media can have a powerful impact on how those people and events are understood by the country at large. 

The lesson will require each student to have a computer with which they can view the seven pictures in the collection from Scurlock Studios.  Using the hot spot function, students will spent 15-20 minutes exploring the collection and the information embedded within.  They will then fill out the front side of the worksheet titled Scurlock Studios. 

Once all students have completed this portion of the worksheet, the teacher will pause the class to read the brief summary paragraph from the Portraits of a City website that gives background on Scurlock Studios.  The teacher will then have the students listen to the short interview with Scurlock's son describing his father (the teacher may also want to print the text of that interview contained on the website so that students can follow along).  

Following the interview, the teacher will  lead a discussion about the photos, asking questions such as, but not limited to:

What was your favorite photo?  Why?

What did you notice about these photos?  (They are mostly pictures of famous African Americans)

How are the people in the photo presented?  (In a proud, favorable light)

The teacher will then refer to the back side of the worksheet and lead a discussion around the two questions relating to the treatment of African Americans in the 20th century, and the limited availability of technology at the time.  

Once the teacher feels that most students have a general understanding of how Scurlock Studios helped disseminate positive portrayals of African Americans, he/she will give students 5-10 to write out an answer to the last question on the back of the worksheet: 

Why do you think Scurlock Studios was so important to African Americans in both Washington DC and across the country?



#LearnWithTR

Peter Gamber
11
 

U Street Riots Two Part Lesson

These six images give a glimpse of the damage done during the 1968 riots on U street following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King.  The images are all attributed to Scurlock Studios, which students will study more in depth in a separate collection.  

The two day lesson centered around this collection begins with a gallery walk.  The Guiding Question for this lesson are:

-What can primary source photographs tell us about an event in history?

-How did the 1968 riots change Washington DC?


The Big Idea for this lesson is:

One event can have lasting effects on the history of a place.

 Each student will have a packet featuring  six 'See, Think, Wonder' pages, and a final page titled 'Gallery Walk Debrief.'  On Day 1, computers will be set up at six tables throughout the classroom, with all computers on a given table showing one of the six images in the collection.  At the teacher's direction, student partnerships will have 3-5 minutes to stop at each station and fill out one of the 'See, Think, Wonder' pages.  

At the conclusion of the gallery walk, student will meet with their partner for approximately 3 minutes to discuss the important question on the last page of their packet: 'Based on the images you viewed, how do you think the riots on U Street changed Washington DC?'  Once students have discussed, they will have approximately 5 minutes to write at least two sentences in response to this question.

On Day 2 of the lesson, the teacher will use a projectable screen in the class room  to walk through the interactive Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, allowing time to pause and watch each embedded video and answer any pressing questions.  

At the conclusion of the article, students will spend approximately 5 minutes at their tables discussing how their understanding of the 1968 riots has changed or expanded based on the Washington Post piece.  The teacher will then lead a discussion that should convey, at the very least, the following points:

-The U Street riots were widespread and caused major damage to areas of the city including but not limited to the U Street Corridor.  

-Many business' in DC were forever wiped out because of the riots and entire neighborhoods took, in some cases, decades to fully recover.

- Martin Luther King's death served as the final straw for many African Americans both in DC and around the country who had long been suffering under the crippling effects of segregation, discrimination, and racism.  

- Following the 1968 riots, most white people left the city.  

Following the teacher discussion, students will have approximately 5 minutes to write down an answer to the single question on the worksheet titled Washington Post Article Debrief:  After viewing the Washington Post article about the 1968 riots, what new information did you learn about how the 1968 riots changed Washington DC?

#LearnWithTR




Peter Gamber
10
 

American Revolution, Investigation 1, Events of the Revolution

This collection is intended to accompany a study of the major events of the American Revolution. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What forces affect historical change? (i.e. people, events, and ideas)
  • What are the important historical facts in the American Revolution? 
  • What events led to the American Revolution?

Standards: 

Section 1:  Colonial America and the French and Indian War

  • 4.7.1. Locate and identify the first 13 colonies and explain how their location and natural environment influenced their development. 
  • 4.7.10. Explain how the British colonial period created the basis for the development of political self-government and a free-market economic system. 
  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution. 

Section 2: Conflicting Interests 

  • 4.8.2 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution (e.g., resistance to imperial policy, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, taxes on tea, and Coercive Acts). 
  • 4.8.3. Describe the significance of the First and Second Continental Congresses and of the Committees of Correspondence.

Section 3: Declaring Independence 

  • 4.8.4. Identify the people and events associated with the drafting and signing of the Declaration of Independence and the document’s significance, including the key political concepts it embodies, the origins of those concepts, and its role in severing ties with Great Britain. 
  • 4.9.6. Explain how the ideals set forth in the Declaration of Independence changed the way people viewed slavery.

Section 4: The Revolution, Briefly 

  • 4.9 Describe the course and consequences of the American Revolution. 
  • 4.9.1. Locate and identify the major military battles, campaigns, and turning points of the Revolutionary War. 
  •  4.9.2. Understand the roles of the American and British leaders, and the Indian leaders’ alliances on both sides. 
  • 4.9.3. Understand the roles of African Americans, including their alliances on both sides (especially the case of Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation and its impact on the war).

Section 5: Building the New Nation 

  • 4.10. Students describe the people and events associated with the development of the U.S. Constitution. 
  • 4.10.1. Describe the significance of the new Constitution of 1787, including the struggles over its ratification and the reasons for the Bill of Rights.  
  • 4.10.2. Describe the direct and indirect (or enabling) statements of the conditions on slavery in the Constitution and their impact on the emerging U.S. nation-state. 
  • 4.10.3. Describe how the Constitution is designed to secure our liberty by both empowering and limiting central government. 
  • 4.10.4. Understand the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the Constitution.

Usage: 

These artifacts are intended to provide students with a consistent opportunity to examine historical artifacts in order to make observations and connections to events of the time period. it is suggested that students examine 1-2 items at a time on a regular basis in order to evaluate each item as a historical source using a See-Think-Wonder routine. 

#LearnwithTR



Kathryn Mancino
27
 

Día de los muertos

This collection is designed for Spanish language learners,  junior novice mid-high, with the intention to help them explore the Spanish culture by learning about the Day of the Dead.  Also, students will be able to enrich their vocabulary with different tasks  and identify how people in the target culture celebrate important traditions.    This collection includes a lesson plan  with different resources in English and Spanish that can be adapted, websites, photos, videos, and worksheets. 

#LearnWithTR

Elizabeth Dilone
22
 

Observational Flower and Plant Drawings

An observational drawing is a drawing of what you see in front of you. In this collection, you will have access to several images of individual flowers and plants to use to create your drawings. When creating your drawing of the flower, consider the size, color, and shape of the flower. Your drawing can become a scientific observational drawing by adding labels to the different parts of a flower. 

As you continue to browse this collection, consider revising your work several times. Like true artists, your first draft is never your last. Have students work with a partner to critique each other's work. Consider correct labels, accurate coloring, adding details, and finally, giving your observational drawing a title for your audience. Review the student friendly rubric in this collection to use to help them consider examples and non-examples.

Attached you will find a general rubric to use for high quality observational drawings.

Essential Questions:

  • What are the different parts of a plant?
  • What does high quality work look like?
  • How can I give kind, specific, and helpful feedback to a partner?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the essential questions, they will understand that:

  • Plants can have a stem, leaf, and flower.
  • High quality work means returning back to the work several times and using a rubric to guide you.
  • Students make noticings and wonderings and provide specific next steps for giving feedback.

Lesson Sequence:

  • Show images of flowers to students or have them see them in your local or school garden.
    • Look at colors, shapes, and lines
  • Learn the parts of a plant and correctly label them.
    • Stem, leaf, flower
  • Review the rubric for high quality observational drawings.
  • Practice drawing flowers in real life or use images found in this collection.
  • Review the Kind, Specific, and Helpful feedback protocol with students.
  • Have students critique each others work.
  • Revise their work based on peer feedback.

#LearnWithTR

Keywords: flower, observational drawing, revision, revise, plants, scientific, draw, artist, high quality

Meghan Sanchez
34
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

How to Care for a Garden: A Study of Humans and Gardens

Gardens come in many shapes and sizes. Some contain flowers and are aesthetically pleasing to the eye. Others contain fruits and vegetables to be eaten and enjoyed. But behind most gardens are the hands and toiling work of humans, working to create that space for its intended purpose. 

This collection will allow you to explore various artwork depicting gardens and either their gardeners or people that use the space for various purposes. Consider how the people are using the space. What materials or tools do they use to aid them when interacting with the garden? Also think about the location and era of each garden. How do people's interactions with their natural environment stay the same or change? What processes remain and how do humans change the landscape of gardens, for better or worse?

Gardens often require humans to tend and take care of them. Within this collection, students will analyze how people across the world take care of and use garden spaces. Use the Garden Anticipation Guide to assess before and after the unit what students know about gardens. 

Essential Questions:

  • What does a gardener do to help plants grow?
  • What tools does a gardener use?
  • What can we do to help our school/community garden grow?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the essential questions, they will understand that:

  • A plant needs water, sunlight and soil to grow.
  • Gardeners work in the garden and help it grow.
  • Gardens have many uses, for enjoyment and events, as well as for growing food.
  • We can take care of our school/community garden and help the plants grow, too.

Lesson Sequence:

  • Administer the Garden Anticipation Guide before starting the unit.
    • Look for common misconceptions or misunderstandings.
  • Preview images in the collection and have students do a See, Think, Wonder thinking routine.
  • Have students compare 2 images side by side to see similarities and differences in what the gardens look like, but also how they are used.
  • Sort the collection based on the uses of each garden.
  • Consider how they want to treat their school/community garden based on these images.
  • Read Aloud Lesson "In My Garden" to learn more garden vocabulary.
  • Administer the Garden Anticipation Guide at the end of the unit.


    • See what students have learned and if you have addressed any misconceptions.

#LearnWithTR

Keywords: garden, people, humans, gardener, flowers, space, tools, fruits, vegetables, plants, landscape, environment, gardening

Meghan Sanchez
37
 

Garden Inquiry Unit

Overview/Rationale: Students from ages 3-6 will learn how to plan and conduct an inquiry to answer the following research question: What does a garden need to grow? 

In this unit, students will be taught how to select, collect, and organize relevant information to answer the research question; how to draft, revise and edit a research report. In addition, residents will teach (or reinforce) up to at least (4) FOUR literacy strategies, that include asking and answering big and little questions, writing and revising drawings, making observations, and synthesizing information into a culminating product. 

Finally, students will demonstrate an increase in content knowledge of plants and gardens related to the CCSS and as evidenced with a final post-assessment in the form of an informational brochure of a school/community garden that students can give to visitors and prospective families.

Essential Questions:

  • What does a plant need to grow? 
    • What are the parts of a plant?
  • What does the Earth do to help plants grow?
      • Rain
      • Sun - photosynthesis
      • Soil
    • How does the plant get food?
      • Soaks up water from roots
  • What does a gardener do to help plants grow?
    • What tools does a gardener use?
    • What can we do to help our school garden grow?
      • What are the rules of the school garden?

Big Idea: As students work with this collection to answer the essential questions, they will understand that:

  • A plant needs water, sunlight and soil to grow
  • A plant has different parts.
  • The Earth helps plants grow.
  • Gardeners work in the garden and help it grow.
  • We can take care of our school/community garden and help the plants grow, too.

Lesson Sequence:

  • Pre/post assessment for vocabulary 
  • Anticipatory guide (pre/post test)
  • First draft of introduction to summative project, a brochure
  • Writing revision of introduction to summative project, a brochure.

Resources in this Collection:

  • Pre/post assessment for vocabulary 
  • Anticipatory guide (pre/post test)
  • Lesson plan for revising writing for brochure
  • Curriculum map outlining a 3 week garden inquiry unit

#LearnWithTR

Keywords: garden, people, humans, gardener, flowers, space, tools, fruits, vegetables, plants, landscape, environment, gardening

Meghan Sanchez
9
 

American Revolution, Investigation 2, Retellings of History

This collection is intended to follow a study of the major events of the American Revolution. Students will examine different artistic interpretations of the American Revolution in order to consider how events are portrayed differently based on the author's perspective. In this study the following goals are targeted: 

Big Ideas: 

  • We must be alert, questioning, and thoughtful readers of history. 
  • All retelling of history is an interpretation. 
  • Historical context is critical for understanding artifacts and historical interpretations. 
  • History is multifaceted and can be understood differently from multiple perspectives. 
  • Historical events are connected to current events.

Expert Thinking: 

  • Analyze primary and secondary sources for relevant historical details.
  • Synthesize details to understand the story of America’s founding.
  • Explain and analyze cause and effect relationships across historical events. 
  • Interpret history using a variety of sources and understanding of perspectives, including: personal stories, events, and factual knowledge.

Guiding Questions: 

  • What criteria should be used to evaluate a historical interpretation? 
  • Why is a single source insufficient for understanding a period of history?

Standards: 

  • SSA.3. Students explain how the present is connected to the past, identifying both similarities and differences between the two, and how some things change over time and some things stay the same. 
  • SSA.5. Students distinguish cause from effect and identify and interpret the multiple causes and effects of historical events
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5 Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.6 Analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent.
  • CCSS.ELA.LITERACY.RL.5.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

#LearnwithTR

Kathryn Mancino
9
 

Black Panther and Black Superhereos

Wakanda Learning Lab is this? 

This Learning Lab explores the importance of representation in popular media. How are people portrayed? Why are they portrayed? What does this say about a people in a society and the society itself? How do these messages affect and inform us about others and ourselves?

First, how are African Americans are represented in popular media. Second, how African, the African Diaspora, and African American culture are represented in Black Panther (both as a comic book character and as part of the modern Marvel cinematic universe) and through other superhero lore. 

The National Museum of African American History and Culture celebrates the museum's acquirement of the movie costume of the iconic and groundbreaking Marvel comic book character Black Panther. The character of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda), and his iconic suit, debuted in the Marvel cinematic universe in the 2015 film Captain America: Civil War, and featured in his self-titled movie Black Panther in 2018. Since the debut of Black Panther (King T'Challa of Wakanda) in the Fantastic Four #52 in July 1966, Black Panther has been a trailblazer for the black superheroes that have followed him in print and on screen. 

Students can explore this Learning Lab independently. Learning exercises and worksheets have been provided to help enhance the exploration of the content. 

Keyword: nmaahc, African, American, Black, Panther, Marvel, T'Challa, Wakanda, suit, comic, superhero, super, hero, civil war, wakanda


Tabbetha Harrison
19
 

Women at the Forefront - Heian Japan

This module is designed to compliment a unit on Heian Japan or of feudalism in Japan in general. The goal of this collection is to purposely include the role of women within an evaluation of feudal Japanese society and history. The lesson plan highlights Japanese women in leading roles, with a focus on historical representations of women during Heian Japan; it also includes similar examples of female characters from the Kamakura and Edo period. The two main categories of the collection are warriors and noble women, with the inclusion of the writer Murasaki Shikibu and illustrations of The Tale of Genji. The idea is to study ‘women’ as its own historical component, and the group as actors exerting historical agency. 

Given that the purpose of this collection is to concentrate on the role of women, it includes artwork that was achieved after the Heian and Kamakura periods and that are representations of salient women from the feudal era. 


Lesson plan (3-4 hours) 

1. Teacher leads an introduction to the feudal system and its particularities in Japan. If the class is by topics, this discussion could easily stem from a general discussion of feudalism in Europe. In our particular case, we have already discussed feudalism in Europe earlier, and so the teachers highlight parallels between the two systems in order to activate the main keywords of the unit and review ideas of how the feudal economy worked. 

2. Students read a textbook chapter on feudal Japan and answer comprehension and analysis questions from the text. Key concepts are established following this reading such as: daimyo, samurai, land distribution, family clans, and feudal social pyramid, among others.  

See: 

Spielvogel, Jackson J. World History: Journey Across Time. New York: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2008. Print.

3. In small groups, students analyze original documents from the feudal period. Documents from the book cited below include: the Bushido code, family letters, and excerpts of laws, among other primary sources. Each group of students is in charge of one particular document. Students should identify: main idea, intended audience, who wrote it, and how does this particular document help understand Japanese feudalism. These documents should also help activate many of the key concepts studied earlier. Once all tables have their findings, the class comes together to present and discuss all documents. 

See: 

Stearns, Peter N. World History in Documents. New York, USA: NYU Press, 2008. Print.

4. Use this collection to shine the light on women during the feudal period. Lead a "Step Inside" routine with the resource "Ohatsu avenging her mistress Onoe." 

Students may well have noticed the silence regarding women's role at this point in the unit. In my classes, for instance, students automatically assume that there are working women alongside male merchants and farmers, but they have doubts as to women occupying higher roles in society. This routine can clarify some doubts as to their presence among higher social ranks. 

5. Allow students to browse the collection, play one of the videos on female samurais or lead other Project Zero routines with the other paintings of female warriors and writers. Once the class is familiar with the resources in the collection, lead the visible thinking routine "People/Parts/Interactions" to reevaluate society as a whole. 

Discuss how their reading of the texts in Step 2 and Step 3 has changed based on this new information. How do they now imagine women in feudal society?

6. Close the unit with the visible thinking routine "Circle of viewpoints." In our class, we use the routine's questions as a prompt for a one-page essay. Students answer the questions of the routine as if they were a person living in feudal Japan; they can choose to write a journal entry or an essay in the third person. Students should use the resources in this collection and in the texts provided to describe the life of their chosen character. This exercise allows students to explore context, society, thoughts, limitations and daily life from the point of view of a historical actor.


Extension activity (1 hour) 

Instead of leading a written routine of "Circle of viewpoints" students can create postcards written from the point of view of their historical characters. Students also design the flip side of their postcards and the artwork should illustrate the environment or experiences of their historical character. 


Denise Rodriguez
18
 

Science and Technology - Edo Japan

This collection is meant to be used in the midst of a unit of Edo Japan. Through the study of new technologies and scientific advances at the time, students can further dive into the Edo national dynamics by means of the developments in science. This module on science and technology is geared towards understanding Edo Japan through inventions and progress other than in the arts, and in unison with the rest of the world, therefore opening discussion as to how closed the country really was. 

Numerous technologies are tightly linked to cultural expressions such as theater arts and the ukiyo-e , and therefore, a separate series of lessons on arts and culture during the Edo Period is absolutely necessary following or preceding this lesson. A study of the Edo culture remains a common approach to explore the society in Edo Japan; the study of science and new technologies compliments this analysis, and it will facilitate engaging a wider audience. 

The artifacts listed here provide illustrations of cross-cultural developments and technological inventions before the end of the Edo period. Through these resources, the teacher can focus on medical advances, particular inventions such as the Montgolfière or simple robots, greater historical processes such as industrialization or everyday objects such as hairpins and cloth, which were also part of the exchange of ideas. 

Analyzing these technological commonalities between Japan and the greater global arena, will provide context for the later discussion of ‘rangaku’ (Dutch studies) during the Edo period. 


Lesson plan (2-4 hours) 

1. Make the resources and artwork available to the students in preparation for the lesson at least one day ahead of class. These artifacts and texts will serve as a pre-research idea bank and starting point. 

2. Teacher can briefly present the material available and prepare a quick lecture or discussion presenting a general overview of science in Japan at the time, or sciences in the world during the same period (e.g. main inventions and discoveries, scientific leaders and award winners, revolutions in science such as the Industrial Revolution.) The lecture could include a brief overview of the state of the social sciences around the world, as well (e.g. theories in psychology, birth of sociology, main theories in anthropology.)

3. Lead the routine "Claim/Support/Question" using the resource "Ukie Edo Nihonbashi Odawaracho uoichi no zu." Discuss the main issues and talking points that surfaced during the routine; tie in the results of the routine with the keywords presented in Step 2. 

4. Students explore on their own the resources in the collection and decide on a topic that they would like to research further. A few ideas are: automated technologies, advances in medicine, technology of daily-life objets or technology in the arts. Teacher can also provide research support to guide students into the collection's reading, such as scaffolded questions or a diagram to lead to their preferred topic. 

5. Students research the topic of their choice and prepare 10-20 minute presentations on the topic. The goal and format of the presentations can also be defined in class (e.g. slideshow, written piece, a draft for a longer essay, a design technology project...) 


Extension activity

At the end of the lesson on Edo culture and science, create a newspaper that covers the main events of the Edo period. Students can write pieces on the area of their choice: politics, science and technology, arts and culture, or even a column on daily life. Teacher can define the word limit and format, topics covered, and members of each newspaper. After editing and correcting the articles, they can be arranged as a real newspaper. The resources in this collection serve as primary and secondary sources for the activity. 

*PDF of examples is attached in the collection.

Denise Rodriguez
13
 

Views on foreigners during the Edo Period - Intro Lesson

This lesson serves as an introduction to the Edo Period in Japan. The module is centered around the artwork "Southern Barbarians," a folding screen painting depicting the arrival of Portuguese traders to a Japanese port, a common scene previous to the Sakoku (closed country) period. After a close analysis of the folding screen, students contrast the scene depicted in the artwork with the proscriptions of the Sakoku edict of 1635 and the Portuguese exclusion edict of 1639. The stark contrast between these two trade scenarios will help students understand the nuance of the political and economic situation of Edo Japan. Additionally, transitioning from a scene where international trade is robust and ordinary, to the drafting of these two edicts severely curtailing this very trade, will lead students to inquire into the extent, as well as the limitations of the closed country period. 


Lesson plan (1 - 2 hours) 

1. "Southern Barbarians" illustrates and extends understanding of the ‘Nanbanjin’ as well as Nanban trade previous to Edo Japan. 'Nanbanjin' referred to Southern European, usually Spanish and Portuguese. The teacher will explain the main traits of Nanban art in order to elucidate further details of the artwork other than the ones that the students observe during the routine. 

For further reference on Nanban Art, read pages 71-142 of the book referenced here. The text contains multiple other examples of folding screens from the period.

See: 

Weston, Victoria. Portugal, Jesuits and Japan: Spiritual Beliefs and Earthly Goods. Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2013. Print.

Link to online copy: https://archive.org/details/portugaljesuitsj00west 

2. Class completes a 'See, Think, Wonder' routine with the resource "Southern Barbarians in Japan." The artwork is full of details (such as the man carrying fabric from another Asian port because the Portuguese served as relay traders in the region). This routine might take 30 minutes or more to complete for this reason. 

As part of a World History class, the teacher could highlight these historic "easter eggs" in the artwork and tie in other topics from class such as cotton and silk trade, slavery, navigation technology, missionaries in the East or the Portuguese empire and extension among other subjects present in the folding screen.  

While at first, the Project Zero routines will help to understand the period, the actors and the reasons for drafting the two edicts, the teacher should also emphasize at the end of the routine why this type of art existed and how Japanese viewed Nanban trade. The purpose is to begin the discussion of Edo Japan with an understanding of the complex world of foreign relations, cultural forces and international commerce at the time.  

3. Following this analysis, students perform a close reading and discussion of the edicts of 1635 and 1639. The Project Zero routine 'Explanation Game' should help guide the reading of the edicts. Students first read the edicts on their own, clarify obtuse language, and highlight a few proscriptions that they believe define the Sakoku period. Following this, students complete the 'Explanation Game' routine in small groups. 

4. At the end of this introductory lesson, the teacher leads a group discussion on the edicts, establishing the main proscriptions and political reasons to ban the Portuguese traders. Teacher should clarify the political and social situation of Japan at the time, the presence of the Spanish and Portuguese traders in neighboring countries and the expansion of their respective empires. If class will continue exploring the nuances of the Edo Period, then the teacher could also briefly explain the difference in operations between the Dutch traders and the Portuguese traders. 


Additional resources

Mini-lesson plan (30 minutes)

The remaining resources in this collection allow to further explore the other foreigners in Edo Japan in order to nuance the discussion of international trade and foreign relations during the period. Smaller groups of 3-5 students can analyze separately various ukiyo-e of foreigners, while completing a 'Question Starts' visible thinking routine and discussing their findings at the end of class period with their classmates. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
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