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Found 1,056 Collections

 

Classroom Activity Using Images of Immigration and Identity from the National Portrait Gallery, the New York Times, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Students can use the "What makes you say that?" and the "3 Ys" thinking routines to explore two modern portraits about identity and immigration from the National Portrait Gallery. The first thinking strategy asks students to look at a work of art for several minutes before answering two questions: "What's going on?" and "What do you see that makes you say that?" (See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

To further and deepen the discussion, I've included a link to a September 2016 New York Times Op-Doc entitled "4.1 Miles," about a coast guard captain on a small Greek island who is suddenly charged with saving thousands of refugees from drowning at sea. (If it doesn't show up easily, you can view the original video on Times Video at https://www.nytimes.com/video/opinion/100000004674545/41-miles.html.) I've also included two sculptures from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an interview with Lisa Sasaki, head of the Smithsonian's Asian Pacific American Center, and resources from the University of Minnesota  Libraries Publishing's Immigration Syllabus - Americans / Immigrants, Weeks 1-4.

You may wish to use the "3 Y's" thinking routine here as well, which asks students to consider the following questions:

1. Why might this [topic, question] matter to me?

2. Why might it matter to people around me [family, friends, city, nation]?

3. Why might it matter to the world?

(See https://learninglab.si.edu/res... for more information.)

#APA2018, #LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Unit 1: Precious Knowledge - Exploring notions of identity and community, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Classical Period Developing into the Romantic Period

The collection begins with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his masterpiece Symphony No. 40.  Mozart was designed to be the first aspect of this particular collection because he is probably the most famous name to come out of the Classical Period of music.  He is accompanied by a photograph of the composition of his famous Symphony No. 40 because that symphony meant so much to what Mozart brought to the Classical Period in terms of music.  Mozart may have been a master at his craft, but he was not the "Father," which brings me to my next point.

The middle section of the collection contains a painting of Franz Joseph Haydn who was one of the most influential names in music during the Classical Period as he had a lot to do with the transition into the Classical Period from the previous Baroque Period.  Haydn is accompanied by a photograph of one of his more famous piano trio composition as a composer.  Haydn was nicknamed the "Father of Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet."  Symphony and string quartet are two of the few things Haydn brought to music during the time period, as well as chamber music and the piano trio.

The final section of the collection contains a painting of Ludwig van Beethoven who was one of, if not the very most famous composer (as well as being a pianist) from the Classical Period of Music.  Beethoven was the main driving force at the end of this musical era as he was such a pivotal aspect of the transition into the later Romantic Period.  Beethoven's portrait is accompanied with one of his most famous composition of Symphony No. 5.  If someone says they haven't heard Beethoven's 5th Symphony, throw it on your phone's playlist and let them listen, I'm sure they've heard it.  The symphony is wildly famous and so is the deaf man that wrote it.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_van_Beethoven

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ludwig-van-Beethoven

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Haydn

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Haydn

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart

#AHMC2019

Nathan Renaud
6
 

Civil Rights Sculpture: Claim Support Question

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "Claim Support Question," a routine for clarifying truth claims, students will examine a portrait of Rosa Parks, a prominent civil rights activist whose refusal to give up her bus seat to a white passenger prompted the 1955-56 Montgomery bus boycott. After discussing the portrait with their peers, students will learn more about the arrest this sculpture depicts by reading the original police report, with notes by a Smithsonian curator.

Created for the 2016 National Portrait Gallery Summer Teacher Institute.

Keywords: african-american, black, civil rights movement, female, woman, women, segregation, NAACP, justice, arrest, #BecauseOfHerStory

Tess Porter
2
 

Civil Rights Posters

Christina Ratatori
8
 

Civil Rights Movement

Susan Ogilvie
23
 

Civil Rights Movement

Christina Ratatori
30
 

Circular Objects

Circular objects for viewing and inspiration

Heather Hammond
15
 

Circles of Fun: Hula Hooping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring hula hoops. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about Oprah (the reader), read articles about hula hoop history, and watch hoop dances performed by native people. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
21
 

Chopsticks

A collection of chopsticks from multiple cultures that tell meanings

#APA2018 #TCSLowell

Karrie Chan-Lam
14
 

China's Terracotta Army: Exploring Artistic Practices

In this activity, students will analyze figures from the Terracotta Army, made for China's First Emperor, Qin Shihuang (259 – 210 BCE), in order to explore the artistic practices of a newly unified China during the Qin dynasty (221 – 206 BCE). Students will explore the elements of art and principles of design used in the terracotta warrior figures before designing their own papercraft terracotta warrior.

The Terracotta Army, a group of approximately 7,000 life-size terracotta warriors and horses, was created for Emperor Qin Shihuang to form a small part of his elaborate tomb complex. These figures are significant not only because of their artistic realism, detail, and diversity, but also because of their rarity – the majority of surviving objects from this time period have been found in Emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb complex.

Authors of this collection are the Emperor Qin Shihuang’s Mausoleum Site Museum, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the Smithsonian’s Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery.

Tags: archaeology; archaeologist; ancient history; artifact; afterlife; funerary practices; burial; death; spiritual beliefs; military; soldier; sculpture; chinese; world; asia; asian; xi'an; empire; see wonder connect; project zero; visible thinking routine; strategy; maker; art making; papercraft; terra cotta; shihuangdi; shi huangdi; shi huang di; earthenware; ceramics

#visiblethinking

Emperor Qin Shihuang's Terracotta Army
20
 

Child Labor in America

What would it have been like to be a child working during the period 1830-1930? Why did children have to go to work during this period in America's history?
Resources in this Collection includes paintings, photographs, text-based sources, and a video depicting children working in a variety of industries across America.
Linda Muller
23
 

Chicano movement

The theme of my collection is Chicano farm workers fighting for their rights. 

Annette Saravia Sanchez
5
 

Chicano movement

The theme of my collection is Chicano farm workers fighting for their rights. 

Rubina Pantoja
5
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

mike mickelson
26
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

Arthur Glaser
17
 

Changing Perspectives on Work in America

This is a collection that allows students to examine the role of the worker in the American Experience and how it has changed over time. #SAAMteach

Anne Marie Hudak
7
 

chairs- form and function

Chair design is an excellent example of form and function working together. Some designs favor ergonomics, some favor aesthetics. The best marry the two. Students were challenged to create a chair for a client.

louise brady
45
 

chairs

sketches, designs, prototypes and finished chairs

Louise Brady
22
 

Central American Traditions Festival: Demonstrations, Interviews, and How-To Videos

This collection comes from a Hispanic Heritage Month family festival celebrating Central American traditions, and in support of an exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian, "Ceramica de los ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed." Held at the National Museum of American History, the festival featured a sampling of music and dance performances, food demonstrations, and hands-on activities. The museum's terrace featured fair tables that included demonstrations of foods such as papusas and tamales, traditional weaving from Guatemala using a back strap loom, and musical and dance performances, including El Salvadoran chanchona by Los Hermanos Lovo, garifuna by the New York-based group Bodoma, and Latin punk rock by DC-based Machetes. Inside, activities included designing a family "bandera" (flag), making a clay cacao pot, making "alfombras" or carpets, which are temporary artworks made with sawdust based on a 400-year-old Guatemalan tradition, a lecture on Central American ceramics with Alex Benitez, archeologist and George Mason University professor, and engaging in conversations about immigration based on objects in the museum's teaching collections.

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Celebrating Central American Traditions | Celebrando tradiciones centroamericanas

This bilingual collection of activities and videos can serve students grades K-5, music and world culture teachers, as well as middle and high school Spanish classes. Enjoy performances and interview with artists about Central American music traditions, including Salvadoran Chanchona music, Honduran Garifuna music, and Latin Punk Rock. Learn about the Sawdust Carpet traditions with artisans and about Central American Archeology with Dr. Alexander Benitez. See objects related to food, music, and celebrations from Latin America brought to the United States. Activities explore Central American geography, traditional Guatemalan Maya fashion, sawdust carpet traditions, and musical traditions. 

Celebrating Central American Traditions was the Smithsonian Hispanic Heritage Feature Event on September 15, 2012. Participating Smithsonian units include: the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Museum of American History, the Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies, the Smithsonian Heritage Month Steering Committee, and the Smithsonian Latino Center.

The Central American Traditions Family Day is made possible by Univision. Additional support is provided by Ford Motor Company Fund. The program also received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered through the Smithsonian Latino Center.


Esta colección bilingüe de actividades y videos le sirven a estudiantes en grados K-5 y maestros de música y cultura mundial. También les sirve a maestros de secundaria y preparatoria. Disfrute muestras e entrevistas con artistas sobre tradiciones musicales centroamericanas, incluyendo música chanchona salvadoreña, música garífuna hondureña, y punk rock latino. Aprenda sobre las alfombras de aserrín con artesanos y sobre arqueología centroamericana con el Dr. Alexander Benítez. Vea objetos relacionados a temas de comida, música y celebraciones traídos a los Estados Unidos por inmigrantes de Latino América. 
Las actividades exploran la geografía de Centroamérica, tradiciones mayas de vestuario, tradiciones de alfombras de aserrín, y tradiciones musicales. 

Este día de la familia de tradiciones centroamericanas era el evento de herencia hispana del Smithsonian el 15 de septiembre 2012. El Museo Nacional de Historia Americana, el Museo Hirshhorn y el Jardín de Esculturas, el Centro Smithsonian de Educación y Estudios Museológicos, el Comité Smithsonian de Administración del Mes de la Herencia, y el Centro Latino del Smithsonian forman parte de este día de la familia.

El día de la familia, Tradiciones de Centroamérica, es hecho posible por Univision. Apoyo adicional es proporcionado por Ford Motor Company Fund y también ha recibido apoyo federal del Latino Initiatives Pool, administrado por el Centro Latino Smithsonian.

Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC)
9
 

Celebrate the Arts

Christina Ratatori
18
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

Cat Collection

This is a fun collection of cats from the Smithsonian Institution along with a photo of my favorite kitty, Lucky.
Linda Muller
18
817-840 of 1,056 Collections