Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(329)
(635)
(839)
(765)
(937)
(28)
(428)
(359)
(191)
(440)
(165)
(173)

Found 964 Collections

 

Asian Pacific American Arts and Crafts: Festival Highlights

This collections comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family festival at the National Museum of Natural History. Included in the collection are interviews and demonstrations about dance with Dana Tai Soon Burgess, Japanese "kimekomi" doll making with Akiko Keene and Anne Cox, Thai fruit and vegetable carving with Phuangthong Malikul, Rangoli Indian design with Nisha Rajam and Anjana Mohanty, Korean calligraphy by Mookjae, and Chinese paper folding by Alice Li.

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Raven Steals the Sun: A Celebration of Tlingit Culture

This collections comes from an American Indian Heritage Month family festival focusing on Tlingit culture from the northwest coast of America. Included here are music and dance performances by the Dakhka Kwaan Dancers, storytelling by Gene Tagaban, Shelly Laws, and Maria Williams (of her book, "How Raven Stole the Sun"), a moiety game, and hands-on demonstrations by Shelly Laws of how to weave a two-stranded basket and to make Tlingit-style beaded ear loops .

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Passport to Argentina: Performances, Interviews, Demonstrations, How-To Videos

This collections comes from a Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day, held in the Kogod Courtyard of the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as part of a larger "Argentina at the Smithsonian" series. Included here are music and dance interviews and performances about tango, and a how-to demonstration to make a clay llama.

Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Central American Traditions Festival: Demonstrations, Interviews, and How-To Videos

This collection comes from a Hispanic Heritage Month family festival celebrating Central American traditions, and in support of an exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian, "Ceramica de los ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed." Held at the National Museum of American History, the festival featured a sampling of music and dance performances, food demonstrations, and hands-on activities. The museum's terrace featured fair tables that included demonstrations of foods such as papusas and tamales, traditional weaving from Guatemala using a back strap loom, and musical and dance performances, including El Salvadoran chanchona by Los Hermanos Lovo, garifuna by the New York-based group Bodoma, and Latin punk rock by DC-based Machetes. Inside, activities included designing a family "bandera" (flag), making a clay cacao pot, making "alfombras" or carpets, which are temporary artworks made with sawdust based on a 400-year-old Guatemalan tradition, a lecture on Central American ceramics with Alex Benitez, archeologist and George Mason University professor, and engaging in conversations about immigration based on objects in the museum's teaching collections.

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

From Deer to Dance: How-to Demonstrations and Informational Videos

This collection comes from a family festival at the National Museum of the American Indian that explored uses of leather in Native communities - literally from the hunting and tanning of deer and their hides, to their use in ritual and everyday life. The collection includes demonstrations of deer-hide tanning, moccasin making, bead working, instructions to make a leather pouch and a daisy chain bracelet, and an interview and performance by Lawrence Baker and the White Oak Singers.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

How to Make a Ti Leaf Lei: Demonstration video, children's stories, dances, and contextual images

Lei making is an important part of Hawaiian culture. These twisted strands are worn on important occasions and given as gifts of welcome. In this collection you'll find a demonstration video by Mokihana Scalph, as well as performances of children's stories, dance performances, and images of leis and ti leaves, to give context to the performances.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Copley & the Art of Revolutionary Figures

This learning lab consists of portraits painted by John Singleton Copley, one of America's first painters. The subjects included all played a role either prior to or during the revolution.

Arthur Glaser
14
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Philippa Rappoport
6
 

Comitia Americana Medals in the National Numismatic Collection

A series of Revolutionary War era medals commissioned by Congress to celebrate the American heroes and their foreign allies who fought for the independence of the United States of America.

Emily Pearce Seigerman
226
 

Origami Animals: Demonstration Videos and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll find interviews with origami artists and a variety of demonstration videos to make paper animals (bull, butterfly, crane) and a paper wallet. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity.

Grab some paper and have fun!


Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Origami Cranes: Activity and Background Information

People from all over the world have enjoyed doing traditional paper crafts for hundreds and sometimes thousands of years. In this set, you'll explore the tradition of the origami Japanese paper crane, a symbol of hope. A demonstration video is included for those who want to make their own crane. Appropriate for classroom, home, or informal education settings.

The Japanese word "origami" comes from two smaller words: "ori" which means "to fold," and "kami" meaning "paper." Although this is the most common word in the United States for the craft of paper folding, the tradition is known to have existed in China and Japan for more than a millennium, and from there it spread to other countries around the world. Japanese patterns tend to focus on animals and flowers, while Chinese designs are usually for things like boats and hats. Paper folding's earlier use was ceremonial, but with time the tradition became popular as a children's activity. 

Philippa Rappoport
8
 

University of Brasilia - comics

desenhos em quadrinhos que não possuem cores

Joana Diniz
26
 

University of Brasilia art deco

a collection that gaves a glimpse about the basic aesthetic of the yearly 20's and 30's, the aesthetic of the modern century,luxurious, industrial and geometric.

giovanna adolfo
13
 

University of Brasilia - Gods of Greece

Obras de arte representando alguns deuses gregos

Omar Silva
15
 

University of Brasilia - Brasões/Coat of Arms

Coleção de Brasões e Escudos para serem estudados por estudantes de Heráldica em seu estudo dessa ciência.

Jade Deus
14
 

University of Brasilia - Ancient Greek Art (Universidade de Brasília - Arte Grega Antiga)

Coleção sobre arte grega antiga e representações posteriores de sua cultura.

Jaqueline Ribeiro
29
 

Sitting for a Portrait

Have you ever sat while someone painted your picture or took a photograph? How does it feel? What do you think about while it occurs? This student activity begins with a portrait of George Washington and a letter describing his attitude towards portraits. After students reflect on these, they will choose another portrait from the set and focus on developing observational skills and an attitude of empathy by examining the work closely and imagining the perspective of one of the people in the image.

Tags: portrait, point of view, perspective, Washington, Pine, de Kooning, John F. Kennedy, JFK, Norman Rockwell, Mitchell, Spalding, video, self-portrait

Kate Harris
9
 

Engaging Families through Art and Technology Programs: "Discovering US/Descubriéndonos"

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate our very successful Discovering Us/Descubriéndonos program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

Discovering Us/Descubriéndonos was a Spanish-language workshop for students and families in the Fairfax County Public School's Family and School Partnerships Luther Jackson Middle School Parent Leadership Program. Pairs of immigrant mothers and their middle school-aged children worked together to create portraits and multimedia production pieces that communicate their family history and their future hopes and dreams.

Included here are examples of student work (videos and portraits), and classroom images of the creative process. The videos were created in iMovie, but there are a variety of other free movie-making apps available. 

#LatinoHAC

Philippa Rappoport
24
 

A Classroom or Family Project: "Today I Am Here," with examples of student work

This collection contains assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, ESOL, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate their own "Today I Am Here" project, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

The "Today I Am Here" book is a wonderful classroom activity, made from one sheet of paper, in which students can share their family stories. The design of the book works well for a K-5 classroom displays, and helps to show the breadth and diversity of the class and to encourage cross-cultural understanding. The project also works extremely well with ESOL students of any age, although the teacher will need to be prepared for possible difficult issues to surface. 

Included here are instructions to make the book, examples of student work (images and video of students reading), as well as images from classroom displays.

The book design is one of many available in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.


Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Native American Ledger Art: Informational Video and Classroom Activity

In this collection, Educator Ramsey Weeks (Assiniboine, Lenape, and Hidatsa), from the National Museum of the American Indian, talks about Native American Ledger Art, and shares ideas for family and classroom "winter count" activities. The activities are suitable for English, art, history, and social studies classrooms.

The collection also includes information and resources about Winter Counts from the National Museum of the American Indian, the National Museum of Natural History, the National Anthropological Archives, the Smithsonian Institution Archives, the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Libraries, and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. 

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

A "Family Lessons" Storybook Activity for the Classroom or Home, with examples of student work

This collection includes instructions and ideas for a classroom activity designed to get children and their families talking and creating together. It is suitable for K-5 classrooms, as an art, English, or social studies-based activity. Included here are examples of student work (images and video of students reading their books), as well as images from classroom displays.

In this activity, a 1st grade teacher from a bilingual school in Washington, D.C., used what we called the "Connections" handmade storybook design to have her students share important family lessons. She described how she did the activity: "I loved the book project and found that it was a way to get parents involved in making a book with their child at home. I pre-made the books since I thought the instructions were a little tricky. The instructions were to discuss and write about a Life Lesson that their families taught them. Our students created bilingual Spanish/English books. The format was perfect for this because it could be English on one side and Spanish on the other. Students enjoyed hanging their books up outside of the class for others to read and then sharing them with the class. It really helped them to understand what important life lessons families teach them and it helped to bring students' home knowledge into the classroom. We connected the books to our Life Lessons unit and plan to do the same thing this year."

This project is based on a handmade book design that can be found, along with several others, in another collection: Fun for the Whole Family: Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/1tozk88HXhnFBU6d.

Philippa Rappoport
11
 

Making "Family Memory" Storybooks: Fun for the Whole Family

This collection includes a series of easy-to-do book projects designed to get families talking and creating together. Any of them can be used in the classroom (English, art, social studies), as a home project, or in an informal learning setting. All books are made from a single sheet of paper.

Titles are ordered generally from most complex to least complex for topic, and include:
"Our Home" Nature Walk Album
Today I Am Here
Connections
My Hero
Music Memories
Kitchen Memories
Special Person
Family Treasure
Things That Make Me Me!
I Am A Star
My Clubhouse
Family Flag
My Name

At the bottom, you'll also find an interview with the creator of these design templates, book artist Sushmita Mazumdar, and a video of her reading one of her own books.

Click on any of these demos and accompanying downloadable instructions to make your own "family memory" storybook!

tags: art, crafts, crafting, how-to

Philippa Rappoport
28
 

Joan Miro

This resources in this collection provide a basic introduction to the life and work of Spanish artist Joan Miró.

Maureen Leary
13
793-816 of 964 Collections