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Found 968 Collections

 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Connie Grimes
3
 

Art and Exercise: Jackson Pollock and Zumba

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about Zumba, students will make Jackson Pollock inspired artwork.

Essential Questions: 

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are energized? What can we do to feel more energized during the day? 

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day 1:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students look at images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. Students participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Emphasis on what Jackson Pollock does with his body to make art. I wonder, do you think that he could make this artwork if he was really sleepy? What can we do to feel more energized. Participate in Zumba video. Demo how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 2:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students review images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. What is Jackson Pollock doing to get these drippy lines? Is he splashing all over the place? Let's watch a video of Jackson Pollock working! How do we look and sound when we watch a video? See think wonder thinking routine. Is he just smashing everywhere or is he making sure to hit the canvas? Is he painting directly on the canvas or is the paint falling through the air? Participate in Zumba video. Have one student demonstrate how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 3:

Materials: Play dough, trays, paint in cups, canvas on floor, aprons, sticks and brushes, drop cloth/plastic to protect the floor

Look closely at examples of Jackson Pollock artwork. Participate in See, Think, Wonder routine. Emphasize that Jackson Pollock painted drips, not his house or his mom. Today we are going to paint just like Jackson Pollock, but first we need to make sure we aren't too sleepy to do it. Participate in Zumba video. How do we use play dough? Some children will use play dough and some will paint like Jackson Pollock. Everyone will do both, but maybe not today. Thumbs up if you understand. Transition to tables some children use play dough and some work with the teacher to paint like Jackson Pollock on the floor. Transition to carpet. What did you notice when you were painting like Jackson Pollock? What would have happened if we were really sleepy? What did we do to get energized?

(this may take more than one class to complete)

Keywords: Zumba, sand, energized, paint, Jackson Pollock, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Allison Yood
7
 

science in art

Chris Crocker
6
 

Art and Exercise: Yoga & Sanpainting.

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about yoga, students will make sand painting inspired by artists around the world.

Essential Questions:

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are calm? What can we do to feel calmer during the day?

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day One:  

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets,

Compare a neatly colored sheet to a sheet with scribbles. What do you notice? Which one shows care? How do we know? Demonstrate coloring within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Look closely at the first image "Indian Man Making Sand Painting." Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Direct students to think about what the person is doing, and how they are feeling.

Day Two:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

Watch video about Tibetan sand painting. Participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Why would you need to be calm to make this kind of work? What can we do to feel calm? Document answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk.

Day Three:

Materials: Colored pencils, coloring sheets

What can we do to feel calm? Participate in short yoga video. Ask students how do they feel? Document student answers. Reminders about coloring: within the lines using one colored pencil at a time. Children can choose one coloring sheet, and complete it at their desk. Alternatively, students can finish a previous coloring sheet.

Day Four:

Materials: trays, colored sand, small containers (ice cube trays or similar would be ideal)

Teacher demonstrates sand painting. Emphasis on moving slowly, using pinching, having a plan, not bumping the tray, etc. If there is time, have one student also try sand painting while teacher and students narrate what they are doing. Ask students, how do we need to feel to do this kind of work? Participate in short yoga video. Transition to tables. Students make sand paintings, teachers document student work with photographs. Afterwards, ask why was it so important for us to feel calm for this work? What did we do to make sure that we felt calm? What would have happened if we were jumping around?

Keywords: yoga, sand, mandala, exercise, sandpainting, Tibetan, American Indian, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Lianne Perez
8
 

Great Depression

Lesson to help teach students about the Great Depression. In this lesson, students will be able to connect the Great Depression to themselves and the world around them today. This lesson is designed to evoke emotion and theme through use of color in writing, and help teach students empathy.

Christine Kohley
3
 

Pocahontas: Comparing and Contrasting Portrayals

In this collection, we explore various portrayals of Pocahontas over 400 years. Students can compare and contrast two or more artistic renderings of Pocahontas, using the provided strategies and historical context with guidance from the teacher. By using portraits of the same sitter by different artists, students consider historical accuracy and changing cultural and historical perspectives. 

This collection was adapted from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White's collection, "Compare and Contrast Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery " and supplemented with the National Museum of the American Indian's Americans online exhibition. Sources for the approach include Compare and Contrast, the National Portrait Gallery's Reading Portraiture Guide and Project Zero's Artful Thinking Routines. 

#historicalthinking


Robin McLaurin
21
 

Art and Exercise: Jackson Pollock and Zumba

Summary:

Students will learn that exercise changes how they feel, and how they feel can change what they are able to do. While learning about Zumba, students will make Jackson Pollock inspired artwork.

Essential Questions: 

How can exercise change the way we feel? What kind of art can we make when we are energized? What can we do to feel more energized during the day? 

Art Standards:

VA:Cr1.1.Pk - Engage in self-directed play with materials

VA:Cn10.1.Pk -  Explore the world using descriptive and expressive words and art-making.

Day 1:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students look at images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. Students participate in See Think Wonder thinking routine. Emphasis on what Jackson Pollock does with his body to make art. I wonder, do you think that he could make this artwork if he was really sleepy? What can we do to feel more energized. Participate in Zumba video. Demo how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 2:

Materials: butcher paper taped to tables, crayons

Students review images of Jackson Pollock in his studio. What is Jackson Pollock doing to get these drippy lines? Is he splashing all over the place? Let's watch a video of Jackson Pollock working! How do we look and sound when we watch a video? See think wonder thinking routine. Is he just smashing everywhere or is he making sure to hit the canvas? Is he painting directly on the canvas or is the paint falling through the air? Participate in Zumba video. Have one student demonstrate how to draw collaboratively on tables covered with butcher paper using crayons. Transition to tables with butcher paper for large collaborative drawings. 

Day 3:

Materials: Play dough, trays, paint in cups, canvas on floor, aprons, sticks and brushes, drop cloth/plastic to protect the floor

Look closely at examples of Jackson Pollock artwork. Participate in See, Think, Wonder routine. Emphasize that Jackson Pollock painted drips, not his house or his mom. Today we are going to paint just like Jackson Pollock, but first we need to make sure we aren't too sleepy to do it. Participate in Zumba video. How do we use play dough? Some children will use play dough and some will paint like Jackson Pollock. Everyone will do both, but maybe not today. Thumbs up if you understand. Transition to tables some children use play dough and some work with the teacher to paint like Jackson Pollock on the floor. Transition to carpet. What did you notice when you were painting like Jackson Pollock? What would have happened if we were really sleepy? What did we do to get energized?

(this may take more than one class to complete)

Keywords: Zumba, sand, energized, paint, Jackson Pollock, Two Rivers

#LearnWithTR

Robin McLaurin
7
 

science in art

Robin McLaurin
6
 

Pictographs

Native American Pictographs
Robin McLaurin
3
 

ART: Colors, shapes & lines all around

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.

Robin McLaurin
25
 

Irish Music

This collection includes a wide range of Irish contemporary and traditional music in the Smithsonian collections, with two lesson plans for grades 3-5 from the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

#SmithsonianMusic

Robin McLaurin
15
 

Indian Education Media Arts Integration

Collection of Native American Ledger Art and drawings on hides. 

Would be used with other resources on modern Ledger Art being created today, as well as the history of ledger art and hide paintings in Plains Indian cultures. 

Robin McLaurin
11
 

Identifying Characteristics of Renaissance Art

This collection will teach you about how Renaissance artists changed the style and focus of art in the period between 1300 and 1600 CE. When you are done, you should be able to thoroughly answer the question: How did the art of the Renaissance reflect the new emphasis on humanism and science?

First, review the painting, Raphael's School of Athens, and learn about the new techniques used.
Then study the additional works in the collection and try to use them as examples of the different techniques. Some of the works are from the Renaissance period and others are more modern interpretations. A worksheet is included at the end of this collection to record your work.
Finally, test your knowledge with a quick quiz. Use your worksheet to help!
Robin McLaurin
11
 

Spring Dance

Spring is the true celebration for nature, so called rebirth. After severing cold winter, the sun arises again to the new cycle of life. The new grass, young soft leaves of the bushes have attracted a bewildering number of creatures that have still had doubts about the new season coming. The alchemy of it has found the reflection in many art masterpieces.

The Spring Dance exhibit captures spring’s nature, its beauty and overall respect for Mother Earth. Spring dance is like a flowering limb in a painting or a slow-motion video of bees pollinating asking us to slow down and listen to the Earth, nature, and all the beauty that surrounds us. 

The Spring dance collection is created for everyone who is interested in learning about nature, who  appreciate the beauty of the spring season in every brush stroke, print or sculpture, in the art work from the past, as well as the present. It will hopefully serve as a reminder to anyone that respect  our nature and should be just as important now, as it was to the past civilizations. We have much to learn from the artists who provide their vision and their ability to conserve and cherish the nature while creating works that inspire people near and far. 

 "Spring Dance" includes paintings, prints, sculpture, and digital objects. 


Linda Honzik
22
 

Artist and Archivist: The Papers and Legacy of Angel Suarez Rosado

The Archives of American Art seeks to identify and acquire personal papers and institutional records of national significance in the arts. This topical collection explores the documents and objects from the papers of Angel Suarez Rosado, a living artist of Puerto Rican descent, and their lasting significance to the public.

Included here are a bilingual video with curator Josh T. Franco, an exhibition webpage from Rosado's site-specific installation at the Allentown Art Museum in Pennsylvania, and the Archives of American Art homepage where users can explore online collections, resources, and publications, and a final discussion question. 

#LatinoHAC


Philippa Rappoport
4
 

Comparing Modern Artists Who Were Inspired By The Ancient Arts

This collection dives into the comparison of modern and contemporary artists who were inspired by the ancient arts (prehistoric, ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt, etc.) and builds upon the meaning of art and transformation of the different styles. What do these artists have in common? How were they inspired by the ancients?

#AHMCFall2019

Ashley Goerke
23
 

Design with Empathy (Objects)

This collection includes objects that reflect a design with empathy approach. Explore the objects further on the URLs under the info link.

Jasmine Kassulke
27
 

Simplicity

Look closely at these resources. What looks like an example of simplicity to you?

Eveleen Eaton
24
 

The Soul's Expression: Identity, Individuality, & the Spirit in Visual Art

Art provides a pathway for individuals to express their inner self while also capturing the outer—this great wide world so intricate it's difficult to define.  Throughout history, humans have sought to  comprehend both their environment and their own inherent cultural uniqueness. This search has become symbolized in their artistic accomplishments and aesthetic heritage. Whether through representations of specific individuals and the human figure or awe-inspiring works of architecture, these art pieces are a window into the creative core of our past. 

In this collection, we will observe the ways in which the soul/spirit has been expressed in art, and how human creativity sheds light upon both individual and cultural identities and its varied interpretations throughout the ages. This collection is organized in three symbolic steps on a stone staircase entitled "The Stone Path of Eternity." To truly travel through each piece, I have included an image, a brief description of the work under information, and then, signified by the yellow (1) above, I've provided my own analysis and interpretation of the piece in its relationship to the collection theme. 

Through lingering through the "Stone Path of Eternity," which is represented by the first two tiles, we will from one stone to the next in seeking the many ways in which the soul's expression can be defined. 

In Stone Number One, "The Spirit's Encased Construct," we'll see how architecture and large-scale artistic projects merge to reflect both cultural identity and the individuality of their leaders through works from ancient Babylonia, Egypt, the Byzantine Empire and into the combinations made possible by the aesthetic  innovations of modern times. 

Shifting step to Stone Number Two, "Human Identity Immortalized in Matter," we delve into the ways in which the human figure is represented and what these images can share with us in terms of the varying levels, purposes, intentions behind the artist's created expressions and impact of depicting the Spirit on Earth. This idea is exemplified in creations ranging from the Paleolithic period to modern times, with examples from Egypt, Ancient Greece,  the Italian Renaissance and the 20th century popular culture. 

Finally, in Stone Number Three,"Individuals and Spirituality Entwine," we step into the door of the spirit directly, traveling through the many methods which cultures apply in trying to simultaneously convey and understand what realms are in union with and beyond this life.  Some cultures who address this idea in their artistic tradition are seen in instances of Egyptian art and work from ancient and Hellenistic Greece, as well as both the Italian Renaissance, Northern European Renaissance, and contemporary Western art. 

 The intended audience for this collection is just as varied as my subject matter. Those who might be drawn to this collection are people attracted to the enigmas of life and death, who have questioned their place in society and the mysteries this world has to hold, and are curious to know more about how, historically, cultures have related to these probing questions—for, as you will see, they certainly have existed as long as humans have walked the earth. No matter if you're in high school, college, or beyond formal education, I hope you will find my musings on these artworks and their meanings compelling and thought-provoking. 

Renowned artist and poet William Blake once wrote, "To see the world in a grain of sand, and to see heaven in a wild flower, hold infinity in the palm of your hands, and eternity in an hour."   From the most abstract art to the remarkably realistic, there is always an image of ourselves, in the an esoteric sense, waiting to be found within.  With its timeless method, Art seeks to create a definition for this all-encompassing and ever-evading essence and I hope to continue that quest with you as we explore this collection. #AHMC2019

Emma Geller
30
 

National Art Education Association Webinar: "Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian"

This collection was created to complement a National Art Education Association (NAEA) webinar, "Constructing Curriculum with the Smithsonian"  (December 11, 2019) featuring resources from the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Learning Lab. 

The webinar features inquiry-based strategies in examining the American experience depicted through portraiture and unpacking the context of historical narratives communicated through art with students. 

This collection was created in collaboration with Briana Zavadil White (National Portrait Gallery) and Candra Flanagan (National Museum of African American History and Culture).

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
16
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The visual arts can be an entry point to literacy in the classroom.  Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.  Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and critical thinkers!  

Keywords: Arts Integration; Africa; African Art; Global Arts; 

Deborah Stokes
88
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
793-816 of 968 Collections