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Found 899 Collections

 

Domingo Ulloa's "Braceros": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Photographer: Anderson, Paul L.

#nmahphc

This is a collection of work by Paul L. Anderson from the Photographic History Collection.

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: platinum print, gum bichromate, gum over platinum, portrait of photographer, window light, bedroom, portraiture, portraiture of women, child with camera, Pictorialism, still life, photograph in garden, Yiddish newspaper, landscape photography, summer, photographs of children, side lighting

NMAH Photographic History Collection
35
 

Photographer: Connell, Will

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photographs by Will Connell from his series, In Pictures, from the Photographic History Collection. 

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: satire, humor, critique, Hollywood, manipulated photography, composite photography, surrealism

Will Connell (1898-1961) was an influential photographer, teacher, and author in Southern California known for his often-satirical “modern pictorialist” style, commercial photography work, and mentorship of a generation of photographers. The National Museum of American History’s Photographic History collection received a donation of 11 prints of various subjects from Connell’s wife in 1963. This donation was followed by another, from Connell’s son, in 1977, comprised of the 49 prints published in In Pictures. Connell was born in McPherson, Kansas, but moved to California soon after. 

As a young man in Los Angeles, Connell came into contact with the thriving California camera clubs of the 1910s and 1920s, and more importantly, the burgeoning Hollywood film industry. After a brief stint in the U.S. Army Signal Corps at the end of the first World War, Connell worked a variety of odd jobs while experimenting in amateur photography. 

Several motion picture studios hired Connell to photograph actors and actresses in the 1920s and 1930s, and he soon became a professional. Connell’s glamour shots of stars such as Myrna Loy, as well as his growing body of art photography, reveal pictorialist influence, and his work was often exhibited at salons and exhibitions throughout the United States. 

In the 1930s, Connell began working as a photographer for magazines including the Saturday Evening PostColliersTime, and Vogue, started teaching photography at Art Center College, and continued work at the Los Angeles studio he opened in 1925. Connell spent the rest of his life in Los Angeles, teaching, judging work, producing commercial work, and writing, notably, his "Counsel by Connell" column in US Camera, which he authored for 15 years. 

His first book, In Pictures, was published in 1937. Now considered a classic work of satire, the book featured montaged, often surreal images that mocked the Hollywood studio system and a public enamored with the motion picture industry. The photographs were published alongside a fictional account of a meeting of Hollywood moguls, written by several of Connell’s friends in the business. While the images appear to be a marked departure from Connell’s earlier soft-focus pictorialism, the sharp, poignant photographs nevertheless retain that movement’s emphasis on composition and communication of a message. In Pictures also pays homage to the film industry where the photographer cut his teeth – many of the images feature close-ups, characteristic stage lighting, and influence of the glamour of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Connell, in his work and teaching until his death in 1961, is cited as an influence on an entire generation of photographers, including Dr. Dain Tasker (COLL.PHOTOS.000031). 

Connell's  1949 book About Photography outlined an artistic philosophy that stressed a straight-forward, communicative style of photography and expressed the author’s belief that even the most commercial work can have artistic merit. A 1963 monograph in US Camera featured fond remembrances from friends Ansel Adams and Dorothea Lange, among others, who praised Connell for his warm personality and unique work. 

NMAH Photographic History Collection
21
 

Photographer: Erwitt, Elliot

#nmahphc

This is a selection from over 200 photographs by Elliot Erwitt in the Photographic History Collection. 

Copyright held by Elliot Erwitt.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: humor, national tragedy, dogs, reportage, fine art photograph, street photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
134
 

Photographer: Grob, Marco

#nmahphc

This is a collection of photographs by photographer Marco Grob from his series, Beyond 9/11: Portraits of Resilience, published in Time magazine on September 9, 2011.

The photographs are large, depicting his subjects larger than life-sized. Here is a mix of public officials, members of the armed forces, and private citizens, with varied roles, experiences, and traumas related to life after September 11, 2001. 

Copyright held by Time Magazine and Marco Grob.

Keywords: portraiture, journalism, teddy bear, political intrigue, political policy, military policy, veteran, injured, disabled veteran, interpreter, national leaders, intelligence community, spy, protest, grieving mother, religion, patriotism, memorial, tribute, national reflection, Iraq, Muslim, chaplain, helmet, 9/11

NMAH Photographic History Collection
18
 

No One Should Be Afraid of Big Beautiful Wolves

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Wolves. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about wolves, read articles about wolves and listen to two podcast episodes about wolves. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
41
 

Photographer: Horenstein, Henry

#nmahphc

This an assortment of photographs by Henry Horenstein from over 150 photographs in the Photographic History Collection. Most are gelatin silver prints, but also, cibachrome, and chromogenic prints.

A portfolio of photographs created by Horenstein's Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) Professional Practices class in 2010, includes a work by Horenstein (accession 2012.0122). A student work by Horenstein is included in a RISD Photographic Education Society Portfolio from 1971  (accession 2004.3040) along with a work by his professor, Harry Callahan.

Keywords: country music, horse racing, gambling, baseball stadium, burlesque, animals, honky-tonk, documentary photography, baseball, music, performers, fans, backstage, Grand Ole Opry, blue grass performer, musical instruments, guitar, slide guitar, harmonica, photojournalism, bars, music park, jukebox

Henry Horenstein (1948-) trained in history in the late 1960s at the University of Chicago and with the British historian EP Thompson. Coming of age at time when the new social history focused attention upon anonymous people, the working class and the role of culture, Horenstein took those lessons and applied them to his photography. He earned an MFA in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) in 1973. While at RISD Horenstein studied with noted photographers Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind. It was actually Callahan who encouraged Horenstein to pursue his passions for photography and country music. Since then, Horenstein has made a career of chronicling a series of subcultures including horse-racing and gambling, baseball stadiums, and burlesque performers, as well as being noted for his photographs of animals. His works are found in books, record covers, magazine publications, museum collections, and gallery walls.

Horenstein is a professor at RISD. In addition to teaching classes, he is an active photographer always working on photographic and publishing projects. Horenstein is well-published, with over 25 books that either feature his photography or are widely used photography text books. He wrote the first darkroom textbooks, Basic Phtography and Beyond Basic Photgraphy. In Fall 2003, his book Honky-Tonk was published, containing an afterword written by NMAH curator Charlie McGovern. In 2006, NMAH featured the exhibition, Honky-Tonk: Country Music Photographs by Henry Horenstein, 1972-1981.

The collection consists of subjects such as fans and performers at outdoor music parks, in the parking lot, and performers on stage. Print sizes vary between 8 X 10 and 11X 14. The two 16 X 20 prints are a view of a crowd seen from backstage with JD Crowe & The South in sillouette, and “Bartender,” Wanda Lohnman leaning on the bar at Tootsies Orchid Lounge.

List of Performers and Venues Depicted in the Collection:

Venues: Fred’s Lounge in Mamou, LA; The Lonestar Ranch, Reed’s Ferry, NH; Hillbilly Ranch, Boston, MA; Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge in Nashville, TN; The Grand Ole Opry at the Ryman Theater, Nashville, TN.

Performers: Abshire Nathan; Acuff, Roy; Akeman, David “Stringbean”; Bailey, Deford; Bare, Bobby; Bird, Billy; Blake, Norman; Blue Sky Boys; Brown, Clarence "Gatemouth"; Burns, Jethro; Butler, Carl and Pearl; Carter, Anita;  Carter, Mother Maybelle and Helen Carter; Cash, Tommy; Clements, Vassar; Cline, Curly ; y; Cooper, Carol Lee; Cooper, Stoney and Wilma Lee; Crook Brothers; Curless, Dick; Dickens, Little Jimmy; Flatt, Lester; Floyd, Hamonica Frank; Harkreader, Fiddlin' Sid; Harris, Emmy Lou ; Holcomb, Roscoe; Holy Modal Rounders; Hughes Family Show; Jackson, Stonewall; JD Crowe & the New South; Jennings, Waylon; Johnson Mountain Boys; Jones, George; Jones, Grandpa and Ramona; Kirby, Brother Oswald; Lewis, Jerry Lee; Lilly Brothers; Lilly Family; Lynn, Loretta; Magaha, Mac; Martin, Jimmy; McCoury, Del; Monroe, Bill;  Lester Flatt; Monroe, Bill and Roland White; Monroe, Bill and the Bluegrass Boys; Monroe, Charlie; Moody, ; Clyde; Nixon, Charlie; Osborne Brothers; Parton, Dolly; Parton, Dolly and Porter Wagoner; Pearl, Minnie (Sarah Ophelia Colley) and Peewee King; Riley, Jeannie C.; Ritter, Woodward Maurice “Tex”; Seeger, Pete; Shepherd, Jean; Skaggs, Ricky; Smith, Connie; Snow, Hank; Snow, Rev. Jimmy Rodgers; Stanley, Ralph; Tubb, Ernest; Tubb, Justin; Turner, Grant; Turner, Spyder; Val, Joe; Wagoner, Porter; Warren, Paul; Watson, Arthel Lane “Doc”; Watson, Merle; Wells, Muriel Deason “Kitty”; Whitley, Keith; Williams, Hank Jr.; Wright, Johnny

NMAH Photographic History Collection
62
 

Activism and Change: Clara Lemlich and the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909

This teaching collection asks students to consider photographs and documentation about early 20th-century Jewish immigrant activist Clara Lemlich (1886-1982, leader of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union and founder of the Progressive Women’s Councils), in the larger context of New York's Garment Industry, the New York Shirtwaist Strike of 1909, and the 1911 Triangle Waist Factory fire. By pairing historical documentation with three thinking routines from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking and Agency by Design materials - "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "Think, Feel, Care," and "Circles of Action," - the collection encourages students to explore complexity and perspective, and fosters a disposition to participate. 

Included here are photographs, documentation, and resources from the Jewish Women's Archive's Encyclopedia of Jewish Women, the Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives at Cornell University's Industrial and Labor Relations School, the Tenement Museum, and the National Museum of American History. 

This collection pairs well with chapter 11 ("Jews are Pushed from Russia") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

Elementary Economics

This playlist on economics is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create a marketplace that demonstrates understanding of basic economic principles.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

Linda Reardon
76
 

CoPilotWhoDidItFirst

This collection was created to support an online class for elementary teachers focusing on STEM individuals as we study "Who Did It First?.

Christy Howard
6
 

G is for Victory

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring gardens. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about gardening, learn about victory gardens, learn about seeds, and listen to a Peter Rabbit read aloud. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Monkeys Grasp for the Moon: Zoom In

Use this collection to browse various views of the Monkeys Grasp for the Moon sculpture at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. See what languages are represented in the work of art.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
25
 

Subject: Domestic Kitchens

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs featuring domestic kitchens from the Photographic History Collection. The photographs appear in many different formats and process, and were created by professional and amateur photographers for a variety of purposes, such as commercial, advertising, documentary, social commentary, snapshot, and humor. 

For this collection, "kitchen" was considered as a space within the home, a place in which food was cooked for non-military and non-commercial purposes, outdoor kitchens and cooking, and things found in kitchens. 

Additional Photographic History Collection Learning Lab collections related to food include, Food, Eateries, Agriculture, and Meals and Eating.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: kitchen, kitchen table, stove, sink, dishes, meal, cooking, meal preparation, baking, pot, pat, knife, spoon, fork, bowl, grilling, barbecuing, outdoor kitchens.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
39
 

Represent!

This playlist on symbolism and representation of the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create original work in the format of their choosing that demonstrates understanding of United States symbolism.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
57
 

ENG 201.1

This collection is for the use of teaching "Fences" by August Wilson from the perspective of Blues Music.

Lindsay Gill
16
 

Our Journeys Our Stories: Portraits of Latino Achievement | Nuestros Caminos Nuestras Historias: Retratos del Logro Latino

This bilingual resource serves middle and high school teachers and students as well as lifelong learners. 

Our Journeys/Our Stories: Portraits of Latino Achievement explores the diversity of the Latino experience in its portrayal of a group of extraordinary men and women and the stories they tell. Like the exhibition, this companion book combines personal narratives, portraits, and dichos, or traditional sayings, to provide an inspirational, illustrated anthology of Latino accomplishments across generations.

People of all ages and backgrounds will be engaged by these inspirational stories and portraits of Latinos who have made significant contributions to American life. By telling the stories of leaders in the Latino community who display outstanding character traits, such as dedication, discipline, perseverance, integrity, passion, responsibility, courage, and commitment, this anthology provides multiple views of achievement that will motivate many other Americans to realize their own dreams.

Este recurso bilingüe sirve a estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria (high school) y a aprendices de todas edades.

Nuestros Caminos/Nuestras Historias: Retratos del Logro Latino explora la diversidad de la vivencia latina al presentar de un grupo de hombres y mujeres extraordinarios y las historias que ellos nos cuentan. Así como la exhibición, esta publicación complementaria combina anécdotas personales, retratos y relatos orales tradicionales para ofrecer una antología ilustrada de inspiración sobre los logros de los latinos a través de distintas generaciones.

Personas de todas las edades y orígenes se sentirán atraídas por estas historias y retratos de latinos que contribuyeron de manera significativa a la vida estadounidense. Al contar la historia de los líderes de la comunidad latina que demuestran características sobresalientes como dedicación, disciplina, perseverancia, integridad, pasión, responsabilidad, valor y compromiso, esta antología ofrece múltiples facetas del logro que motivará a muchos otros estadounidenses a materializar sus propios sueños.

Smithsonian Latino Center
4
 

World War II at Home and Beyond

The Second World War (1939-1945), while global, did not fully impact the United States until the military attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. This collection is a snapshot of the lives of Americans both on the battlefield and on the Homefront. Portraiture can be used as a springboard into deeper discussions about biography and our collective history. Users of this collection are encouraged to take into account how the sitter’s social and political identities play a role in how they experienced the war.

Guiding questions:

Who are the notable political and military figures of the war? How does portraiture capture their respective reputations?

In what ways did the Second World War impact the lives of men and women from underrepresented groups? What is the legacy of this impact?

How did the entertainment industry rally around the troops during the war?

What was the role of journalism, literature, and documentary film during the war? How were these formats used to disseminate information to the American public?


Ashleigh Coren
48
 

Cameras and Apparatus: Mutoscopes and Title Cards

#nmahphc

This is a selection of mutoscope title cards and apparatus. 

The Mutoscope Collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection is among the most significant of its kind in any museum. Composed of 3 cameras, 13 viewers, 59 movie reels, and 53 title cards (movie posters), the collection documents the early years of the most successful and influential motion picture company of the industry’s formative period. It also showcases a unique style of movie exhibition that outlasted its early competitors, existing well into the 20th century.

Keywords: Mutoscope, early motion picture, moving picture, movie 

Written by Ryan Lintelman for a finding aid for the Photographic History Collection:

 The American Mutoscope Company was founded in 1895 by a group of four men, Elias Koopman, Herman Casler, Henry Marvin, and William Kennedy Laurie Dickson, to manufacture a motion picture viewer called the mutoscope, and to produce films for exhibition. 

Dickson had recently left the employ of Thomas Edison, for whom he had solved the problem of “doing for the eye what the phonograph does for the ear” by inventing the modern motion picture. Casler and Dickson worked together to perfect the mutoscope, which exhibited films transferred to a series of cards mounted in the style of a flip book on a metal core, and avoided Edison’s patents with this slightly different style of exhibition. 

The company’s headquarters in New York City featured a rooftop studio on a turntable to ensure favorable illumination, and the short subjects made here found such success that by 1897, the Edison company’s dominance of the industry was in danger. American Mutoscope became American Mutoscope & Biograph in 1899, when the namesake projector, invented by Casler, became the most used in the industry.

Mutoscope viewers were found in many amusement areas and arcades until at least the 1960s. Their inexpensiveness and short, often comical or sensational subjects allowed the machines a far longer life than the competing Edison Kinetoscope. The company also found success in its production and projection of motion pictures, though its activity was mired by patent litigation involving Thomas Edison through the 1910s. 

The notable director D. W. Griffith was first hired as an actor, working with pioneering cinematographer G. W. “Billy” Bitzer, before moving behind the camera at Biograph, and making 450 films for the company. Griffith and Bitzer invented cinematographic techniques like the fade-out and iris shot, made the first film in Hollywood, and launched the careers of early stars Mary Pickford and Lillian Gish. The company, simply renamed the Biograph Company in 1909, went out of business in 1928, after losing Griffith and facing a changing movie industry.  

The Museum’s collection was acquired in the years between 1926 and the mid-1970s. The original mutograph camera and two later models of the camera were given to the Smithsonian in 1926 by the International Mutoscope Reel Company, which inherited Biograph’s mutoscope works and continued making the viewers and reels through the 1940s. 

The viewers, reels, and posters in the collection were acquired for exhibition in the National Museum of American History, and were later accessioned as objects in the Photographic History Collection. Many of the mutoscope reels in the collection date to the period from 1896-1905, and show early motion picture subjects, some of which were thought to be lost films before their examination in 2008.


NMAH Photographic History Collection
64
 

Our Big Blue World

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our Oceans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about ocean life as well as videos to learn about scientists studying coral reefs. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
41
 

Photographer: Baughman, J. Ross

#nmahphc

The J. Ross Baughman collection in the Photographic History Collection at the National Museum of American History includes some 290 photographs, his Pulitzer prize, five contact sheets, an album, two books, and cameras.  The photographs include various subjects such as his time in the Middle East, an unpublished series entitled Beautified, as well as, prints from Baughman's image assignments for Life magazine during the 1980s , including a story about two gay fathers.

Some of Baughman's cameras are seen the PHC's Learning Lab collection, Leicas.

Objects from Baughman's career and professional experiences can be found in two other National Museum of American History Collections (accessions 2010.0228 and 2010.0229).

For additional materials, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photojournalist, photojournalism, Rhodesia, Pulitzer Prize, undercover work,  journalism, photography and danger, newspapers, print culture, picture magazines, print journalism, freelance photographer, controversy, contemporary politics, international affairs, protest, community activism, AIDS, gay family life, military, mercenaries





NMAH Photographic History Collection
53
 

Exploring Art with Quilts at the Anacostia Community Museum

This collection of quilts offers material to challenge conventional definitions of art and artists, explore the many different ways to tell a visual story and spark discussions about the traditions that are passed down in families. This resource is structured around 2 hour-long lessons in art analysis, a creative task and a reflection session.

A range of styles and traditions are represented here, as each quilt and quilter has their own story to tell. The story can be evident in the visual content of the quilt, but the context in which it was created can be equally important. Quilting is an art form taught between generations and amongst friends, bridging the gap between material culture and intangible heritage.

By encouraging young learners to look closely and develop evidence-based arguments, we can hope to build their skills to think deeply about the interrelationship of art, memory and community.

Enclosed in the Teacher's Resource is a list of quilts, short biographies of the artists and potential discussion questions. Also included are suggested art and craft activities, and an annotated bibliography for educators who want to do more research on the topic.

Goals:

  • How can we express things that are important to us?
  • How can quilts teach us about community?

Objectives:

  • Challenge and expand definitions of “art” and “artist.”
  • Develop a toolkit for visual analysis.
  • Understand different forms of creative self-expression.
  • Learn about traditions we share in our communities and pass between generations.
  • Empower students’ creativity.
Celine Romano
14
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic

Colleen Stevens
0
 

The Flu

Understanding the Pandemic
Colleen Stevens
3
793-816 of 899 Collections