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Found 6,091 Collections

 

Athletes and Aviators: Women Who Shaped History

This topical collection includes resources related to featured women athletes and aviators. This collection includes portraits of the athletes and aviators, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the women's life stories, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.  

Keywords: Bessie Coleman, Pancho Barnes, Babe Zaharias, Billie Jean King, Florence Griffith Joyner ("Flo Jo"), Ibtihaj Muhammad, #BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
39
 

Diary

Resources for 5th and 6th grade social studies curriculum.

5th - Japanese Culture

6th - Immigration

Tracey Barhorst
25
 

Marine Life

The wonders below. 

This collection is about the life below us. The ocean is like a whole other planet! There is so much still left to explore down there. The objects I have selected are different fish, plant life and ways to take care of the ocean. 

It is important to educate ourselves about the fish in the ocean in order to understand how to be around them. They are sometimes more scared of us than we are of them.  

We must take care of the ocean and the living creatures that call the ocean  home. The ocean is a source of recreation for humans as well as a benefit for everyday life. The ocean covers more than 50% of the planet. The ocean helps eliminate carbon and provide us with oxygen. 

Lianne Perez
28
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
46
 

IB Biology Pentadactly Limbs

Gretel von Bargen
136
 

Benjamin Franklin's method of habit formation.

Benjamin Franklin, inventor, statesman, writer, publisher and economist relates in his autobiography that early in his life he decided to focus on arriving at moral perfection. He made a list of 13 virtues, assigning a page to each. Under each virtue, he wrote a summary that gave it fuller meaning. Then he practised each one for a certain length of time.

To make these virtues a habit, Franklin can up with a method to grade himself on his daily actions. In a journal, he drew a table with a row for every virtue and a column for every day of the week. Every time he made a fault, he made a mark in the appropriate column. Each week he focused his attention on a different virtue. Over time, through repetition, he hoped to one day experience the pleasure of “viewing a clean Book.”

Akash Mahurkar
0
 

Memorable Moments

Look at the images. . . 

  • What is happening?
  • Who do you think these people are?
  • Do you have a memory of doing something similar? 

ART MAKING CHALLENGE:  Create an artwork that depicts a memory of something you enjoyed with family or friends. The artwork could be a drawing, painting, or collage.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

My Smithsonian Closet

You could be exceptionally well-dressed if the Smithsonian were your closet.

Darren Milligan
30
 

Test

Gail Zwerling
5
 

Power Posters by designExplorr

Learn about the power of designing posters that communicate meaningful messages using Adobe Spark. Adobe Spark is the easiest and quickest way to create visually stunning graphics. In this workshop students will develop meaningful messages, discover the three things that make posters powerful, and determine what makes a poster work. This presentation also includes guiding questions to help direct the students learning such as, "What is the posters message?," "What kind of imagery is used?," "Who is the poster for?," and "What makes the poster work?" Materials used in this workshop are a pictures of historic powerful poster, a discovery worksheet, and two supporting videos. This workshop is for youth (ages 12-16).

designExplorr
19
 

Storytelling Training: Brainstorming and Going into the Field

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Unlike the other Storytelling Training courses where information is given to you, you'll be asked to contribute ideas for your own potential story in this course. There's no right or wrong answers here. It's a way to help you start planning. Remember to make a copy of this collection first if you want your answers to be saved so you can revisit them!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
12
 

Storytelling Training: Creating Your Story

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. Ready to start developing your story? In this short course, you'll get some tips on how to create a story board, writing a non-fiction script, and more. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation.

SITES Museum on Main Street
27
 

Storytelling Training: What is Cultural Storytelling?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this short online course, you'll learn about what we call "cultural storytelling" and  what the value of cultural storytelling is to society at large. 

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
16
 

Storytelling Training: What Makes a Great Story?

Whether you're participating in the Stories: YES program in conjunction with a Museum on Main Street exhibition or creating digital stories on your own, the six modules in the Storytelling Training Series will help you think through everything to help get started. In this course, you'll  learn about the parts that make stories compelling, especially non-fiction narratives which are unique stories grounded in real-life perspectives and history. Explore how your story can be both personal and research-based at the same time. Even documentaries start with a script!

This training module was created by the Smithsonian's Museum on Main Street program, a part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, in conjunction with the MuseWeb Foundation. 

SITES Museum on Main Street
22
 

Software makes cyberbullies think twice

Social media is a place where people can express their opinions.  The internet is an unregulated world that has no forms of morals and it is also a frontier for cyber bullying. Young people are exposed to violence, verbal outbursts, nudism  and explicit sexual content. When consumed for a long time, all these contents can lead to some serious issues. For instance, they may start having anxiety attacks and start to register them in their minds which can lead to mental issues.  The following statement is from a then 13 year old from Chicago named Trisha Prabhu. She had came home from school and read a news story about an 11-year-old girl who had committed suicide by jumping off her town’s water tower. In the months before her death, the girl had been repeatedly cyberbullied.

“I was shocked, heart-broken and angry,” says Prabhu, now 15. “I knew I had to do something to stop this from ever happening again.”

So Prabhu came up with a cyber-solution for cyberbullying. She invented a software called ReThink, which scans social media messages for offensive content, and gives the writer a chance to reconsider whether he or she really wants to post. The program, which can be installed by parents on home computers or by teachers on school computers, uses context-sensitive word screening to flag messages for content. 

For Prabhu, ReThink is personal. She too had been cyberbullied in her younger years, receiving nasty messages about her clothes.

“I’m what you’d call thick-skinned, so I just brushed it off and moved on,” Prabhu says. “But after reading about this story, I realized that many adolescents were really affected by these offensive messages, especially if the cyberbullying was repeated and targeted.”   

Cyberbullying is indeed a serious and growing problem. Research shows 43 percent of kids have experienced cyberbullying. Some 70 percent of students report seeing “frequent” online bullying. Bullying victims are up to nine times more likely to consider suicide.

ReThink works on the principle that the adolescent brain is like a “car with no brakes,” Prabhu says. “It’s all too well-known that adolescents make impulsive, rash decisions.”

It has indeed been well-established that the prefrontal cortex—a region of the brain important for self-control and decision-making—doesn’t fully develop until a person is about 25 years old. This is likely a major factor behind teenagers’ sometimes irresponsible and risky decisions—texting and driving, fighting, even simply neglecting homework in favor of hanging out with friends.

Prabhu has received numerous accolades for her work. She was a global finalist in the Google Science Fair, selected to exhibit at the White House Science Fair and received a Global Anti-Bullying Hero award from Auburn University, among other honors.

Prabhu has long been fascinated by computer science; she first began learning to code at age 11 through a local technology education program for kids. Since developing ReThink, she has created a free ReThink app for smartphones. She’s also rolled out a ReThink “ambassador” program for schools, where student representatives spread anti-cyberbullying messages to their classmates and students are invited to take an anti-cyberbullying pledge.

Prabhu has received multiple messages from people who know firsthand the trauma cyberbullying can cause—parents whose children have committed suicide after repeated cyberbullying, police officers who deal with cyberbullying on a criminal level, school counselors and administrators who struggle to help cyberbullied students. And then there are the victims themselves. One particularly memorable note Prabhu received was not from a teenager, but from an adult, a retired teacher who had been bullied for years by an adult adopted daughter. “Trisha,” the woman wrote, “ReThink would not only help adolescents, it would help adults too.”

To test how it works, I downloaded ReThink to my iPhone. I started to post "I hate you" to a Facebook wall (with no intentions, of course, of actually posting it), and a ReThink bubble popped up. “Let’s change these words to make it positive,” it suggested. “You’re a fat,” I began, and I was interrupted by “Don’t say things that you may regret later!” ReThink has a high sensitivity for obscenities. When I started the missive with a four-letter word, the ReThink bubble showed up to ask “Are these words really you?”

That said, the program did not catch everything. I was able to type "You're ugly and stupid" without getting a ReThink message, and somehow "nobody likes you, you idiot" also snuck through. 

Though ReThink is clearly not yet a perfect tool for capturing all cyber cruelty, when it does offer teens a second chance they tend to take it. According to research conducted with ReThink, teens change their mind about posting the hurtful messages 93 percent of the time.

Prabhu ultimately hopes to have ReThink installed for free on school computers and libraries across the country, and even the world—she has plans to develop the program in multiple languages.

“I look forward to a day when we have conquered cyberbullying,” she says. 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/new-software-makes-cyberbullies-think-twice-180956948/

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/do-social-media-death-threats-count-real-threats-or-just-digital-venting-180953506/




Rosemith Metayer
1
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The visual arts can be an entry point to literacy in the classroom.  Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.  Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and critical thinkers!  

Learn more about distance learning opportunities from the National Museum of African Art by visiting the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC).

Keywords: NJPSA

Deborah Stokes
89
 

Segregation

Mabi Aleman
1
 

Disney

Amelia Tehrani
9
 

The positive and negative impacts of social media on our youths today

The use of social media has both negative and positive impacts on youths. Some of the positive impacts include making them up to date on events that are happening around the world and also enables them to network and stay connected with their fellow youths and friends without physical meetings. Additionally, youths can create pages and groups in the social media platforms where they can built friendship with other youths who may share the same values with them and this can lead to long time friendship.  

Even though social media seem to connect youths and make them stay up to date, but it can also leads to  isolation, depression, anxiety and many other problems.  Social media reduces the number of face-to face interactions,  it can also decreases their productivity in school because of the amount of long hours they spend on these sites. Social media is also a platform where bullying can take place. Peer pressure is another concern for youths who are on these social sites. For example, they may look at pictures or videos of their peers doing illegal things such as drugs, drinking etc and they may have the urge to try these drugs because they may feel pressured by their friends, they don't want to be left out and not being a part of the crowd. 

 In conclusion, social networks has been proved to have both positive and negative effects on our youths. As parents we should guide and advise our children about the dangers of being in these sites when they are misused and overused. 


Rosemith Metayer
22
 

Software makes cyberbullies think twice

Over the past two decades, social media have gained so much growth and fame to an extent that many researchers are now interested in learning more about these social platforms and their effects on our youths.  The internet is an unregulated world that has no forms of morals and it is also a frontier for cyber bullying. Young people are exposed to violence, verbal outbursts, nudism  and explicit sexual content. When consumed for a long time, all these contents can lead to some serious issues. For instance, they may start having anxiety attacks and start to register them in their minds which can lead to mental issues. Researchers have found that these social sites impact the lives of our youth a great deal in terms of morals, behavior and even education wise. 

  The following statement is from a then 13 year old from Chicago named Trisha Prabhu. She had came home from school and read a news story about an 11-year-old girl who had committed suicide by jumping off her town’s water tower. In the months before her death, the girl had been repeatedly cyberbullied.

“I was shocked, heart-broken and angry,” says Prabhu, now 15. “I knew I had to do something to stop this from ever happening again.”

So Prabhu came up with a cyber-solution for cyberbullying. She invented a software called ReThink, which scans social media messages for offensive content, and gives the writer a chance to reconsider whether he or she really wants to post. The program, which can be installed by parents on home computers or by teachers on school computers, uses context-sensitive word screening to flag messages for content. 

For Prabhu, ReThink is personal. She too had been cyberbullied in her younger years, receiving nasty messages about her clothes.

“I’m what you’d call thick-skinned, so I just brushed it off and moved on,” Prabhu says. “But after reading about this story, I realized that many adolescents were really affected by these offensive messages, especially if the cyberbullying was repeated and targeted.”   

Cyberbullying is indeed a serious and growing problem. Research shows 43 percent of kids have experienced cyberbullying. Some 70 percent of students report seeing “frequent” online bullying. Bullying victims are up to nine times more likely to consider suicide.

ReThink works on the principle that the adolescent brain is like a “car with no brakes,” Prabhu says. “It’s all too well-known that adolescents make impulsive, rash decisions.”

It has indeed been well-established that the prefrontal cortex—a region of the brain important for self-control and decision-making—doesn’t fully develop until a person is about 25 years old. This is likely a major factor behind teenagers’ sometimes irresponsible and risky decisions—texting and driving, fighting, even simply neglecting homework in favor of hanging out with friends.

Prabhu has received numerous accolades for her work. She was a global finalist in the Google Science Fair, selected to exhibit at the White House Science Fair and received a Global Anti-Bullying Hero award from Auburn University, among other honors.

Prabhu has long been fascinated by computer science; she first began learning to code at age 11 through a local technology education program for kids. Since developing ReThink, she has created a free ReThink app for smartphones. She’s also rolled out a ReThink “ambassador” program for schools, where student representatives spread anti-cyberbullying messages to their classmates and students are invited to take an anti-cyberbullying pledge.

Prabhu has received multiple messages from people who know firsthand the trauma cyberbullying can cause—parents whose children have committed suicide after repeated cyberbullying, police officers who deal with cyberbullying on a criminal level, school counselors and administrators who struggle to help cyberbullied students. And then there are the victims themselves. One particularly memorable note Prabhu received was not from a teenager, but from an adult, a retired teacher who had been bullied for years by an adult adopted daughter. “Trisha,” the woman wrote, “ReThink would not only help adolescents, it would help adults too.”

To test how it works, I downloaded ReThink to my iPhone. I started to post "I hate you" to a Facebook wall (with no intentions, of course, of actually posting it), and a ReThink bubble popped up. “Let’s change these words to make it positive,” it suggested. “You’re a fat,” I began, and I was interrupted by “Don’t say things that you may regret later!” ReThink has a high sensitivity for obscenities. When I started the missive with a four-letter word, the ReThink bubble showed up to ask “Are these words really you?”

That said, the program did not catch everything. I was able to type "You're ugly and stupid" without getting a ReThink message, and somehow "nobody likes you, you idiot" also snuck through. 

Though ReThink is clearly not yet a perfect tool for capturing all cyber cruelty, when it does offer teens a second chance they tend to take it. According to research conducted with ReThink, teens change their mind about posting the hurtful messages 93 percent of the time.

Prabhu ultimately hopes to have ReThink installed for free on school computers and libraries across the country, and even the world—she has plans to develop the program in multiple languages.

“I look forward to a day when we have conquered cyberbullying,” she says. 

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/new-software-makes-cyberbullies-think-twice-180956948/

 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/do-social-media-death-threats-count-real-threats-or-just-digital-venting-180953506/




Rosemith Metayer
1
 

Spring Dance

Spring is the true celebration for nature, so called rebirth. After severing cold winter, the sun arises again to the new cycle of life. The new grass, young soft leaves of the bushes have attracted a bewildering number of creatures that have still had doubts about the new season coming. The alchemy of it has found the reflection in many art masterpieces.

The Spring Dance exhibit captures spring’s nature, its beauty and overall respect for Mother Earth. Spring dance is like a flowering limb in a painting or a slow-motion video of bees pollinating asking us to slow down and listen to the Earth, nature, and all the beauty that surrounds us. 

The Spring dance collection is created for everyone who is interested in learning about nature, who  appreciate the beauty of the spring season in every brush stroke, print or sculpture, in the art work from the past, as well as the present. It will hopefully serve as a reminder to anyone that respect  our nature and should be just as important now, as it was to the past civilizations. We have much to learn from the artists who provide their vision and their ability to conserve and cherish the nature while creating works that inspire people near and far. 

 "Spring Dance" includes paintings, prints, sculpture, and digital objects. 


Linda Honzik
22
 

Edward O. Wilson: Ant Biologist

What is an entomologist? Through the study of the Edward O. Wilson portrait, our students will explore the career of an ant biologist, study the plants and insects in our community, and create a self-portrait demonstrating their understanding.

Objectives: 

  • Students will be able to define the role of an entomologist.
  • Students will understand the concept of biodiversity.
  • Students will be able to classify a living creature as "insect" or "not an insect."
  • Students will observe and be able to describe local insects.
  • Students will understand the concept of habitat.
  • Students will observe and be able to describe  native plants.

Assessment: Students will create a self-portrait with a variety of native insects and plants similar to the E. O. Wilson portrait.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019

#NPGteach

Jill Johnson
8
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
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