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Found 943 Collections

 

chairs

sketches, designs, prototypes and finished chairs

Louise Brady
22
 

National History Day: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
88
 

National History Day: American Immigrant Experiences

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2019 theme, "Triumph and Tragedy in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.  

These resources - including objects, documents, websites, and articles - reveal challenges and opportunities experienced by American immigrants in the 19th to mid-20th centuries.  Resources highlight hardships that compelled people to leave their homelands, difficulties immigrants faced upon arrival, and ways they overcame obstacles to build new lives and communities in America.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

The history of immigration in America is an immense topic, and this collection addresses only aspects of it.  Use this collection to brainstorm project topics, find connected resources, and as a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: 1800s, 1900s angel island, ellis island, immigration test, community, prejudice, irish, jewish, syrian, lebanese, arab, italian, mexican, german, greek, bohemian, czech, slovenian, know nothing, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, swedish, chinese exclusion act, japanese american incarceration, internment, bracero program, stories project, #NHD

EDSITEment
128
 

National History Day: Chinese Exclusion Act

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including digital exhibitions, photographs, documents, and lesson plans - help explore the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882), a United States Federal Law restricting immigration of all Chinese laborers and the first law implemented to prevent a specific ethnic group from immigrating to the United States.  Resources highlight the lives of Chinese-American families and racism in American advertisements from the Act's enactment to its repeal in 1943. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: prejudice, discrimination; immigration; china; asia; asian; chinese-american; asian-american; 19th century; 1800s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; apa; asian pacific american; nhd; #NHD2018; #NHD; #APA2018

EDSITEment
47
 

National History Day: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including lesson plans, portraits, digital exhibitions, and artwork - help explore how conflict and compromise led to the drafting and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Thirteenth Amendment. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: 1700s; 1800s; civil war; james madison; john jay; thomas jefferson; roger sherman; federalists anti-federalists debate; frederick douglass; abraham lincoln; slavery; anti-slavery; constitutional convention 1787; george washington; early democracy; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD; #NHD2018


EDSITEment
32
 

National History Day: The Mexican Revolution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including primary source newspaper articles, recorded symposiums, lesson plans, and artwork - help explore the complexity and impact of the Mexican Revolution (c. 1910-1920). Resources highlight Pancho Villa, US-Mexico relations, and the artistic movements that rose out of the Revolution.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: mexico; new spain; independence; revolutionary; encomienda; francisco pancho villa; emiliano zapata; agrarista; porfirio diaz; madero; woodrow wilson; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD #NHD2018

EDSITEment
31
 

National History Day: Art and World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including artworks, handwritten memoirs, lesson plans, and articles  - help explore World War I (1914-1918) through artwork created by soldiers and other individuals involved in the Great War.  Collection highlights artists Horace Pippin (a member of the Harlem Hellfighters), Claggett Wilson, William James Aylward, and Harvey Thomas Dunn.  Other important artists and artworks, as well as additional information on World War I, is located at the end. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: wwi; ww1; world war 1; soldier; military; perspective; witness;  african american; artist; artwork; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
75
 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A facial expression? Explore the different ways people and animals communicate.

amir.tim.sifi
8
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Spring Dance

Spring is the true celebration for nature, so called rebirth. After severing cold winter, the sun arises again to the new cycle of life. The new grass, young soft leaves of the bushes have attracted a bewildering number of creatures that have still had doubts about the new season coming. The alchemy of it has found the reflection in many art masterpieces.

The Spring Dance exhibit captures spring’s nature, its beauty and overall respect for Mother Earth. Spring dance is like a flowering limb in a painting or a slow-motion video of bees pollinating asking us to slow down and listen to the Earth, nature, and all the beauty that surrounds us. 

The Spring dance collection is created for everyone who is interested in learning about nature, who  appreciate the beauty of the spring season in every brush stroke, print or sculpture, in the art work from the past, as well as the present. It will hopefully serve as a reminder to anyone that respect  our nature and should be just as important now, as it was to the past civilizations. We have much to learn from the artists who provide their vision and their ability to conserve and cherish the nature while creating works that inspire people near and far. 

 "Spring Dance" includes paintings, prints, sculpture, and digital objects. 


Linda Honzik
22
 

Black Panther Movie Collection

The visual arts can be an entry point to literacy in the classroom.  Use these objects in the collection of the National Museum of African Art to aid students to explore authentic African art works that inspired the Academy Award winning costume design of Ruth Carter in the blockbuster movie Black Panther.  Students can develop visual vocabulary through close looking to describe mood, tone, atmosphere, and inference and explore cross-curricular and cross cultural connections.  It allows them to really be creative and critical thinkers!  

Learn more about distance learning opportunities from the National Museum of African Art by visiting the Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration (CILC).

Keywords: NJPSA

Deborah Stokes
89
 

Memorable Moments

Look at the images. . . 

  • What is happening?
  • Who do you think these people are?
  • Do you have a memory of doing something similar? 

ART MAKING CHALLENGE:  Create an artwork that depicts a memory of something you enjoyed with family or friends. The artwork could be a drawing, painting, or collage.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
46
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Naomi Manzella
6
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Artist and Archivist: The Papers and Legacy of Angel Suarez Rosado

The Archives of American Art seeks to identify and acquire personal papers and institutional records of national significance in the arts. This topical collection explores the documents and objects from the papers of Angel Suarez Rosado, a living artist of Puerto Rican descent, and their lasting significance to the public.

Included here are a bilingual video with curator Josh T. Franco, an exhibition webpage from Rosado's site-specific installation at the Allentown Art Museum in Pennsylvania, and the Archives of American Art homepage where users can explore online collections, resources, and publications, and a final discussion question. 

#LatinoHAC


Philippa Rappoport
4
 

Intangible Heritage through Material Culture: The Journey of an Ecuadorian Boat Seat

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by exploring an Ecuadorian boat seat, the first object donated to the National Museum of African History and Culture, and how this tangible object represents the survival and transmission of intangible cultural heritage in the African diaspora. The seat belonged to Débora Nazareno, a descendant of enslaved Africans in Ecuador, and is engraved with Anansi, a popular spider figure in West African folklore. The boat seat was gifted to the museum by her grandson, Juan Garcia Salazar, a renowned Esmeraldan historian. 

Included here are the objects itself, a bilingual video with curator Ariana Curtis, two suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "Unveiling Stories" - from Harvard's Project Zero Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the museum display, Maroon communities, Anansi, the oral tradition.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC 

Philippa Rappoport
19
 

America & Athletics

Christina Ratatori
13
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018 #TWUtech #WISSIT #EthnicStudies #Docenttips

Cindy Perreira
48
 

Mexican American Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of Latino families. #ethnicstudies

Lanette Aguero
20
 

Telling Myth with art

An in-class activity for a college level Intro to Mythology course that has students consider how mythology is not only passed on through oral or written word, but also through art.  #MCteach

Megan Howard
7
 

Anasazi

This collection is help my students understand the geographical area the Anasazi were located, and artwork created to further help them understand a piece of music dedicated to the Anasazi.
Melissa Gilbert
9
745-768 of 943 Collections