Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(271)
(572)
(728)
(667)
(817)
(25)
(372)
(299)
(150)
(379)
(150)
(165)

Found 843 Collections

 

Lash's Native American Removal Collection

The objective of this lesson is to use "Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington" as a catalyst for discussion and analysis of the American government's attitude toward South East Native Americans in the early 19th Century that eventually lead to the Trail of Tears.

#SAAMteach
Trail of Tears
Native American
Lash
Georgia Performance Standard: SS8H5
Stephanie Lash
12
 

Women in 1950s America

A learning resource to help develop students' ability to analyze an image and form an argument. The images in this collection are different portrayals of women in the United States during the 1950s. As you look through them, have your students think about these three key questions:

-What is being shown in the image?

-How is the woman represented in the image? Use concrete details from the image.

-Does the image compare to modern representations of women? Why or why not?

The collection ends with a quiz that can either be used as assignment to gauge the students' ability to pull together their analysis into a conclusion or a class discussion.

Alexander Graves
7
 

Jumping In Lesson

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

The Jumping In lesson helps students to use their creativity in different ways using their five senses (see, hear, touch, taste, and smell). Students will use following sentence starter to help direct students' thinking..

I see, I hear, I touch, I smell, and I taste

The activity can help to exercises their....

Imagination

Creative Writing

Focusing on key details

Asking and answering What, Where, When, When, and How questions

Intro to poetry

Expressive Language

The Jumping In lesson is a great way to start poetry and integrating Social Studies and Science. The activity can be done as a whole group discussion, partner work, or independently.

Maria Menjivar
3
 

My Smithsonian Closet

You could be exceptionally well-dressed if the Smithsonian were your closet.
Kate Harris
29
 

Exploring American Ideals in Art

How can American ideals be defined and expressed in different ways? The United States of America is associated the ideals of Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality. Those values have served as sources of inspiration for artists as goals that the nation aspires to (even if they are not always achieved). This collection contains artworks inspired by one or more of the ideals listed above. Students should choose a work and identify which ideal it relates to: Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality.

In a short essay based on the artwork, students should answer the following questions:

-How would the student define Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, or Equality?

-What is the artist trying to communicate about how this idea plays out in America?

-Does the student agree or disagree with the artist's interpretation?

If desired, students could create their own artwork based on one of the American ideals.

Kate Harris
21
 

Photography: Black and White Portraits of Artists in the Hirshhorn Collection

Black and white portraiture depicting some of the artists in the Hirshhorn Masterworks collection on view, as well as other works in the collection. The following are the artists listed and an example of their work included in the collection. The dates listed below are for when each photograph was taken.

1. Helen Frankenthaler ("Painted on 21st Street") ca. 1950

2. Willem De Kooning ("Woman") 1946

3. Jackson Pollock ("Number 3, 1949: Tiger") 1950

4. Jean Dubuffet ("Limbour as a Crustacean") 1956

5. Yves Klein ("Untitled Anthropometry") 1961

6. Joan Mitchell ("Field For Skies") and Michael Goldberg ca. 1950

7. Joan Miro ("Woman before an Eclipse with her Hair Disheveled by the Wind") ca. 1930

8. Richard Diebenkorn ("Man and Woman in a Large Room") 1963

9. Elaine De Kooning and Franz Kline ("Portrait of J.H. Hirshhorn") 1957

10. Auguste Rodin ("Iris, Messenger of the Gods") 1904

11. Alexander Calder ("29 Discs") ca. 1960

Alexandra Baran
11
 

A House Divided: Photography in the Civil War

How does photography of the Civil War inform us about this period? This teaching collection includes the lesson plan, A House Divided: Photography of the Civil War, published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Students examine Civil War photographs, write captions, and discuss how viewing photographs enhances your understanding of historical events and concepts.
Stephanie Norby
9
 

Remember Pearl Harbor

"Remember Pearl Harbor" was a call to action, that rallied all Americans to step up and support the war in any way they could. This collection explores the symbolism and impact of lapel pins produced during World War II.

pacific_avation_museum_edu
5
 

Pop goes our Culture

A collection of cultural icons of recent memory
joe hobson
13
 

Copley & the Art of Revolutionary Figures

This learning lab consists of portraits painted by John Singleton Copley, one of America's first painters. The subjects included all played a role either prior to or during the revolution.

Arthur Glaser
14
 

3-D Resources from the Smithsonian

This collection provides an introduction to the 3D resources available from the Smithsonian Institution. All of the items in this collection are videos showing 3D models or sharing the process of creating such materials. To explore the models directly in a 3D viewer, download file information, and discover tours and other educator resources, please visit 3d.si.edu.

Models of interest to K-12 teachers might include:

  • Apollo 11 command module
  • Amelia Earhart's flight suit
  • Liang Bua (archaeological site where homo floriensis was discovered)
  • Funerary bust of Haliphat (from Palmyra)
  • Jamestown burial sites and artifacts
  • David Livingstone's gun
  • Porcelain dishes and other home items in the Freer Gallery of Art (from Asian cultures)
  • Killer Whale Hat
  • Whale and dolphin fossils
  • Cosmic Buddha
  • Woolly mammoth skeleton
  • Wright Brothers flyer
  • Gunboat Philadelphia
Kate Harris
19
 

Achelous and Hercules: What makes you say that?

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "What makes you say that?," students will examine the 1947 mural "Achelous and Hercules," by Thomas Hart Benton. This artwork explores the relationship between man and water in post-war agricultural America through the retelling of an Ancient Greek myth. Collection includes a video analysis by a museum director and an interactive exploring areas of interest in the artwork.

Tags: greece; agriculture; agricultural; missouri river; marshall plan; truman; cultural connections; midwest

Tess Porter
4
 

African American Artists and Ancient Greek Myth: Teacher's Guide

This teacher's guide explores how myths transcend time and place through three modern paintings by African American artists, who reinterpret Ancient Greek myth to comment on the human experience. Collection includes three paintings and a lesson plan published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which includes background information on myths and artists, as well as activity ideas. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey.' The video details his artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
5
 

Ancient Greek Myth: Reinterpreted by African American Artists

In this student activity, analyze the timelessness of myth through three works of art by modern African American artists. Each artist, inspired by Ancient Greek myth, retells stories and reinterprets symbols to explore personal and universal themes. Includes three works of art, summaries of the myths they reference, and discussion questions. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey,' that details Bearden's artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
6
 

Sitting for a Portrait

Have you ever sat while someone painted your picture or took a photograph? How does it feel? What do you think about while it occurs? This student activity begins with a portrait of George Washington and a letter describing his attitude towards portraits. After students reflect on these, they will choose another portrait from the set and focus on developing observational skills and an attitude of empathy by examining the work closely and imagining the perspective of one of the people in the image.

Tags: portrait, point of view, perspective, Washington, Pine, de Kooning, John F. Kennedy, JFK, Norman Rockwell, Mitchell, Spalding, video, self-portrait

Kate Harris
9
 

Theodore Roszak in the Smithsonian collections

Theodore Roszak (1907-1981) was a Polish American painter and sculptor. He emigrated to the United States as a young child, and won the Logan Medal of Art by age 25. He later moved to New York and taught at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

Included in this collection are several works of art and a podcast from the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. You can find other works by searching the collections.

Philippa Rappoport
20
 

Joseph Stella in the Smithsonian collections

Joseph Stella (1877-1946) was an Italian born American Futurist painter. He is best known for his renditions of industrial America.

Included in this collection are some his works from the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, with oral history interviews from the Smithsonian Institution Library and the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. You can find other works by searching the collections.


Philippa Rappoport
32
 

Central American Traditions Festival: Demonstrations, Interviews, and How-To Videos

This collection comes from a Hispanic Heritage Month family festival celebrating Central American traditions, and in support of an exhibition at the National Museum of the American Indian, "Ceramica de los ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed." Held at the National Museum of American History, the festival featured a sampling of music and dance performances, food demonstrations, and hands-on activities. The museum's terrace featured fair tables that included demonstrations of foods such as papusas and tamales, traditional weaving from Guatemala using a back strap loom, and musical and dance performances, including El Salvadoran chanchona by Los Hermanos Lovo, garifuna by the New York-based group Bodoma, and Latin punk rock by DC-based Machetes. Inside, activities included designing a family "bandera" (flag), making a clay cacao pot, making "alfombras" or carpets, which are temporary artworks made with sawdust based on a 400-year-old Guatemalan tradition, a lecture on Central American ceramics with Alex Benitez, archeologist and George Mason University professor, and engaging in conversations about immigration based on objects in the museum's teaching collections.

Philippa Rappoport
14
 

Vikings--Myths and Mysteries

The Vikings have inspired many artists, writers, and filmmakers with their bravery and unique way of life. However, many misconceptions have developed and many facts are still unknown. In this collection, students will explore the website for the Vikings exhibit while taking notes on the included worksheet. Then, they'll evaluate three works of art (and a team logo) based on the Vikings to gauge how accurately they represent Viking life. Finally, they will be asked to create their own 2-D or 3-D object representing Viking life.

Tags: Norse, inquiry, Viking, Norway, Greenland, Iceland

Kate Harris
7
 

Women's History Month Family Festival

Here is a collection of videos from a Women's History Month family festival, that includes interviews and performance footage with Kathak dancer Prachi Dalal, Native American singing group Ulali, mother-daughter storyteller and artist Yona Zeldis McDonough and Malcah Zeldis, and the Georgia Tech Glee Club paying tribute to the women in the audience for Women's History Month.

Philippa Rappoport
5
 

Asian Pacific American Arts and Crafts: Festival Highlights

This collections comes from an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month family festival at the National Museum of Natural History. Included in the collection are interviews and demonstrations about dance with Dana Tai Soon Burgess, Japanese "kimekomi" doll making with Akiko Keene and Anne Cox, Thai fruit and vegetable carving with Phuangthong Malikul, Rangoli Indian design with Nisha Rajam and Anjana Mohanty, Korean calligraphy by Mookjae, and Chinese paper folding by Alice Li.

Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Black History Month Family Festival: Interviews, Performances, Highlights

This collections comes from a Black History Month family festival created to complement the exhibition, "The Black List." Included here are a gallery tour with curator Ann Shumard, and interviews with puppeteer Schroeder Cherry, guitarist Warner Williams, the Taratibu Youth Association Step Dance Group, silhouette artist Lauren Muney and collage artist Michael Albert.

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

Capturing Visitor Voices in Teen-Made videos

In 2011 the Smithsonian joined with the Pearson Foundation to train ARTLAB+ teens to document personal stories at Smithsonian Heritage Month family festivals. ARTLAB+ is a design studio based out of ArtLab space in the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. The teens captured visitor voices through several years, covering a variety of topics including views on race, culture, nature, belonging, music and food.

Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Raven Steals the Sun: A Celebration of Tlingit Culture

This collections comes from an American Indian Heritage Month family festival focusing on Tlingit culture from the northwest coast of America. Included here are music and dance performances by the Dakhka Kwaan Dancers, storytelling by Gene Tagaban, Shelly Laws, and Maria Williams (of her book, "How Raven Stole the Sun"), a moiety game, and hands-on demonstrations by Shelly Laws of how to weave a two-stranded basket and to make Tlingit-style beaded ear loops .

Philippa Rappoport
10
745-768 of 843 Collections