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Found 816 Collections

 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 2 | 6-8 yrs

Make Yourself at Home 

Campers will learn the basic fundamentals of interior design—space, line, form, light, color, texture, function, and pattern to design the perfect 3-dimensional space that reflects each campers’ unique personality and style.

Project Partner | Flavor Paper

Using specific design elements, campers will curate and create a wallpaper for their interior space with Flavor Paper.

Project Partner| Zimmerman Workshop

Campers will design their own mini-furniture with Architecture and Design studio, Zimmerman Workshop. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 6-8 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 6-8 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 9-10 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
19
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 5 | Ages 9-12

Typography Today

A new “type” of camp activity! Discover the creativity of designing type and lettering. From cursive to calligraphy, campers will learn about typography through gallery explorations and off-site field trips and create their own letterforms.

Project Partner Aditi Panchal

Aditi Panchal is a Hand Lettering artist and designer based in Oklahoma City. Along with being a full time graphic designer, she owns Aditi Panchal Designs, a business that allows her to design stationery and paper products.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

2019 National High School Design Competition

2019 CHALLENGE

Cooper Hewitt is delighted to announce the theme of the 2019 National High School Design Competition: The Nature of Design: What would you design (or redesign) that is a nature-based solution to a global problem?

ABOUT THE COMPETITION

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum launched the National High School Design Competition in collaboration with Target in 2016. Every year, students around the country are challenged to design a solution to a unique scenario, inspired by Cooper Hewitt’s rich collection and stimulating exhibitions.

Visit Cooper Hewitt website to learn more  
WWW.COOPERHEWITT.ORG/DESIGNCOMPETITION


Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
19
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Smithsonian Science Education Center
7
 

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

Art, Creative Writing, and Public Speaking: A Portraiture Workshop for the ELL Classroom

This collection includes instructions and documentation of a replicable art-based program for English Language Learners (ELLs). The information included can be adapted for high school students and speakers of any language, including native English speakers. Activities were designed to foster in participants important skills such as visual literacy, public speaking, creative writing, art appreciation, collaborative learning, and advocacy, and also to develop empathy, confidence, and self-esteem. 

Keywords: ESL, ESOL, portraits, migration, immigration, stories, identity, monologues

#NPGteach

Philippa Rappoport
51
 

Circles of Fun: Hula Hooping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring hula hoops. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about Oprah (the reader), read articles about hula hoop history, and watch hoop dances performed by native people. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
21
 

Sharks: Friend or Foe?

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Sharks. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about sharks, read articles about sharks, and listen to the read aloud Clark the Shark. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Cultural Expressions: Art for Social Change

This collection features civic engagement, language arts, and visual arts activities using posters from the Division of Community Education of Puerto Rico (DIVEDCO). This Puerto Rican Poster Art was inspired by works created during Works Progress Administration (WPA). Scaled bilingual activities for grades 2-5, 6-8, and 9-12.

Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC)
6
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
28
 

Making History, Sharing Culture Featuring Disney-Pixar's "Coco"

This collection can serve students grades 2-5 as well middle school and high school students interested in Latino culture or as part of a Spanish project exploring family traditions. Activities include family or classroom activity on collage making with family photos and writing your own museum object label. Videos include a special performance from Grupo Bella and interviews with artists, chefs, curators, and educators that formed part of the Making History, Sharing Culture Featuring Disney-Pixar's "Coco" Event. An on-stage conversation featuring Illustrator Ana Ramirez and Character Modeling Artist Alonso Martinez of Disney-Pixar's "Coco" is also featured.

Making History, Sharing Culture featuring Disney-Pixar's "Coco" was presented as the Smithsonian's feature Hispanic Heritage event by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the National Museum of American History in October 2018. A portion of the travel of the Smithsonian Latino Center and this program was generously provided by Southwest Airlines. Additional support was provided by The Walt Disney Company.

Smithsonian Latino Center (SLC)
11
 

Fort Tejon

The Native Americans who lived in this area prior to the establishment of Fort Tejon are generally referred to as the Emigdiano. They were an inland group of the Chumash people. Unlike their coastal relatives, however, the Emigdiano avoided contact with European explorers and settlers, and were never brought into one of the missions or even incorporated into the Sebastian Indian Reservation. Once Fort Tejon was established, the Emigdiano often worked as independent contractors for the army, providing guides for bear hunts and delivering fresh fruits from their fields for sale in officers row. 

In 1852, President Millard Fillmore appointed Edward F. Beale to the position of Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, and sent him to California to head off further confrontation between the Indians and the many gold seekers and other settlers who were pouring into California. After studying the situation, Beale decided that the best approach was to set up a large Indian reservation at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley and to invite displaced Indian groups to settle there. 

In order to implement his plan, Beale requested a federal appropriation of $500,000 and military support for the 75,000 acre reservation he had selected at the foot of Tejon Pass. Colonel Ethan Allen Hitchcock, commander of the Pacific Division of the U.S. Army, supported Beale's plan and agreed to set up a military post on or near the Indian reservation. The army was eager, in any case, to abandon Fort Miller (near Fresno, California) in favor of a more strategically advantageous site in California's southern San Joaquin Valley. 

In August 1854, Major J.L. Donaldson, a quartermaster officer, chose the present site in Canada de las Uvas. The site was handsome and promised adequate wood and water. It was just 17 miles southwest of the Sebastian Indian Reservation, and it was right on what Major Donaldson was convinced would become the main route between the Central Valley and Southern California. 

For almost ten years, Fort Tejon was the center of activity in the region between Stockton and Los Angeles. The soldiers, known as Dragoons, garrisoned at Fort Tejon patrolled most of central and southern California and sometimes as far as Utah. Dragoons from Fort Tejon provided protection and policed the settlers, travelers and Indians in the region. People from all over the area looked to Fort Tejon for employment, safety, social activities and the latest news from back east. 

Lori Wear
63
 

Antelope Valley Indian Museum

The Antelope Valley Indian Museum has been a public museum since 1932, but it has also been a homestead, a theater, a dude ranch, a Hollywood set, and an attraction. It is situated on 147 acres of desert parkland on the south side of Piute Butte in the Mojave Desert against a dramatic backdrop of Joshua trees and towering rock formations. The building’s unique architecture and creative engineering earned it a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, and the Native American Heritage Commission designated Piute Butte as a sacred landscape.

The Collection
The museum exhibits over 3,000 objects, including many rare and outstanding objects from the Antelope Valley, California coast, Great Basin, and the Southwest. An important four way trade route developed in the Antelope Valley at least 4,000 years ago. The trade routes went west and south to the California coast, north to the Central Valley, northeast to the Great Basin (the desert east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains), and east to the pueblos in what is now Arizona, New Mexico, and Mexico. The trade route expanded and enriched the material and social resources available to Antelope Valley residents, allowing large villages to develop near the valley’s springs.

History of H. Arden Edwards
Howard Arden Edwards, a self-taught artist, was fascinated with the scenery around the buttes in the Antelope Valley.  He homesteaded 160 acres on rocky Piute Butte and in 1928.  With his wife and teenage son, he began construction of what was to be a combination home and showcase for his extensive collection of American Indian culture.  A unique structure evolved: a Tudor Revival style building, decorated inside and out with American Indian designs and motifs, incorporating large granite boulders as an integral part of the building both inside and out. You actually climb upon these rocks as you go from picturesque Kachina Hall upstairs to California Hall. This unusual upper level housed Mr. Edwards' original "Antelope Valley Indian Research Museum."

History of Grace Oliver
Grace Wilcox Oliver, a onetime student of anthropology, discovered Edwards' property while hiking in the desert.  She felt it would be a perfect setting for a personal hideaway. She contacted the owner with an offer to buy the property.  Successful in these negotiations, she modified some features of the main building, added her own collections, and expanded the physical facilities on the property.  By this time she had decided to open the entire structure as The Antelope Valley Indian Museum.  Grace operated the museum intermittently through the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s and 1970s.

Becoming a State Park
Local support for the acquisition of the property by the State of California led Oliver to sell the land and donate the collection to State Parks in 1979. The museum has been designated as a Regional Indian Museum, emphasizing American Indian cultures of the Great Basin.

Lori Wear
40
 

Introducing Hokusai: Mad about Painting

This Learning Lab Collection introduces three themes from the Hokusai:  Mad about Painting exhibition and provides works of art, classroom activities, and discussion questions associated with each theme. 

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Be a Reporter; customs; daily life; dragons; Edo; Great Wave; Hokusai; Japan; nature; New Year; personification; poetry; power; Project Zero; Mount Fuji; See Think Wonder; Step Inside; symbols; thunder; woodblock print

About the exhibition:

Hokusai:  Mad about Painting
November 23, 2019–November 8, 2020
Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 5–8

The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely recognized for a single image—Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, an icon of global art—yet he produced thousands of works throughout his long life. Charles Lang Freer recognized the artist’s vast abilities before many other collectors, and he assembled the world’s largest collection of paintings, sketches, and drawings by Hokusai. In commemoration of the centennial of Freer’s death in 1919, and in celebration of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020, the Freer Gallery presents a yearlong exploration of the prolific career of Katsushika Hokusai. Works large and small are on view, from six-panel folding screens and hanging scrolls to paintings and drawings. Also included are rare hanshita-e, drawings for woodblock prints that were adhered to the wood and frequently destroyed in the process of carving the block prior to printing. Among the many featured works are Hokusai’s manga, his often-humorous renderings of everyday life in Japan. Together, these works reveal an artistic genius who thought he might finally achieve true mastery in painting—if he lived to the age of 110.


Freer and Sackler Galleries
26
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Jessica Radovich
73
 

Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring rain. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about weather, the water cycle and thunderstorms. Families can also read articles about rain, learn about how native peoples interact with rain, and listen to a read aloud in the hopes to keep families from feeling bored. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
50
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


National Museum of American History
66
 

Maps and Globes

Maps, Globes, and a story

Linda Jaeger
18
 

Umbrellas for a Rainy Day

Umbrellas and the Water Cycle

Linda Jaeger
14
745-768 of 816 Collections