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Found 757 Collections

 

Vietnam War for novel The Things They Carried

This collection has images of the Vietnam War to background the novel The Things They Carried.     This collection should help to answer the compelling question; was the Vietnam War justified?

#TeachingInquiry

June Bohr
5
 

Visual Thinking Strategies

The goal of teaching visual thinking strategies is to encourage students to observe independently and back up their responses with evidence.
Annotations for each image contain key questions to help students practice visual thinking.
Linda Muller
5
 

Voice over - XXXtentacion's impact on the youth

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

PABLO CAVALLO
21
 

Voices of Social Justice

In Voices of Social Justice, students will learn about some of the major figures who struggled to obtain civil rights for disenfranchised or marginalized groups. They will listen to stories of social justice and analyze portraits of individuals who broke barriers——from key nineteenth-century reformers to modern leaders—and will likely be encouraged to consider how they, too, can become civically engaged.

#NPGteach

Briana White
19
 

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence

Take a close look at the portraits and objects within “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence” exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. “Votes for Women” outlines the more than 80-year movement for women to obtain the right to vote as part of the larger struggle for equality that continued through the 1965 Civil Rights Act and arguably lingers today. This Learning Module highlights figures such as Lucy Stone and Alice Paul, but also sheds light on the racial struggles of the suffrage movement and how African American women, often excluded by white women from the main suffrage organizations, organized for citizenship rights (including the right to vote).

#NPGteach

#BecauseOfHerStory

Nicole Vance
46
 

Walt Whitman lesson with WPA art

#SAAMteach

Eddie Black
9
 

Walt Whitman Poetry and Art

SAAMteach - High School Level English classes

Lesson concept is included in resources

Anne Ruka
7
 

Walt Whitman: Examining Portraiture

This teacher's guide provides portraits and analysis questions to enrich students' examination of Walt Whitman, an American poet, essayist, and journalist. Includes the video "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" and the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators, both of which provide suggestions and questions for analyzing portraiture.  Also includes "A Close, Intimate Look at Walt Whitman," an article about the final portrait in this collection that may be used as a lesson extension.

Consider:

  • What do these portraits have in common? How are they different?
  • How are these portraits both fact and fiction?
  • How do these portraits reflect how he wanted to be seen, or how others wanted him to be seen? Consider for what purpose these portraits were created.
  • Having read one of his poems, does the portrait capture your image of Walt Whitman? Why, or why not?
  • If you were creating your own portrait of Walt Whitman, what characteristics would you emphasize, and why?

Keywords: new york, ny, leaves of grass, humanist, writer

Tess Porter
9
 

Warrenton (VA) History: An Artistic Introduction

This collection provides Fauquier County, Virginia, teachers with the tools needed to incorporate the work of Warrenton artist Richard Norris Brooke into our local history curriculum.  In addition to the focus painting, A Dog Swap, the collection provides access to museum and digital resources that delve into the painting's history, including the location and people on whom the figures are based.   It also includes an additional, connected Brooke painting, A Pastoral Visit, that teachers may wish to share with their students.   As the painting is intended as an introduction to the local history unit, a suggested Project Zero Visual Thinking Activity, "See/Think/Wonder" is also included to spark students' curiosity and help them make connections as they are introduced to this artwork.

#SAAMteach

Selena Dickey
6
 

Water, Art and Greek Mythology: Achelous and Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules", a supplemental picture guide to the story, a non-fiction article about fresh water from Readworks, and a supplemental worksheet.


Tags: greece, #SAAMTeach , water

Taylor Hummell
6
 

Watsons Go to Birmingham

Katie Cahill
2
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.

Also included in this collection is an accompanying activity sheet on building archival narratives. This prompt is meant to guide students through the process of building the Weikers family story based on the records that they created and kept during a harrowing chapter in their history.



For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Sierra Green
11
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.


For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

#historicalthinking


Aubrey Gennari
9
 

Weikers Family Collection

A collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States.

For more information about the Weiker family story, see their profile on Generation to Generation: Family Stories Drawn from the Rauh Jewish Archives at http://www.jewishfamilieshistory.org/

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources

Molly Long
11
 

Weikers Family Collection Class Warm-Up

This is a single document with hot spots and questions used to model primary source analysis for a sixth grade class. It is drawn from a collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States. You can find the full collection here:

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/weikers-family-collection/zGJCDjyWqouEufnb

Questions to consider are:

a. Who are the Weikers?

b. Where did they live?

c. When did they live? What can they tell us about this time in history?

d. How were they affected by Nazi Germany?

e. What did they feel about the Nazis?

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources, Pittsburgh

Kate Harris
2
 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Westward Expansion through Various Eyes

Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way


#SAAMteach

Mary Brunz
12
 

What Did Gatsby's America Look Like?

Select up to five artifacts that best reflect the setting of the novel. Justify your selections by considering the information provided for each artifact. You can access the information once you select an image and press the lowercase i tab on the left.


Consider how the information from the Smithsonian Learning Lab compares to Fitzgerald's use of setting  throughout The Great Gatsby.

Reminder about setting: five key components that establish the setting:

1: time [moment/hour/morning/evening/season],

2: era, 

3. place {village/city/country], 

4: location{inside a house, at a park, on a front lawn}, 

5: occupation (of protagonist, antagonist especially)

Scott Tuffiash
13
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

What is an American?

Context:  A lesson for a U.S. History/American Literature humanities class.  This lesson will come towards the end of our study of the Revolutionary period.

 Essential Question:  What does it mean to be an American in 1782?

Questions:

  • How does Crevecoeur define an American here?  How accurate is his definition for that time period?
  • To whom is Crevecouer making this appeal?  What sort of person would be motivated by these passages?
  • Who is included in Crevecoeur's appeal?  Who is left out?
  • How is "this new man" different?
  • How does Crevecoeur help build the ideals and myths of America?
  • How does this letter build on the idea of American Exceptionalism?  America as the land of "new and improved"?

Activities:

Students will have read Letter III before class.

Using the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the text excerpts below (or the entire text of Letter III), students will identify three key quotes or words  and find artwork that connects to chosen text.  Three total text excerpts and three works of art.  The works of art can support, refute, or simply connect to some aspect of the quote and the idea of what it means to be an American.

Students will share their chosen artworks and quotes via the class Google classroom. 

We will use the images as the basis for a class discussion on what it means to be an American.

After the class discussion, students will write a short paper on "What is an American?" 

----------------------------------

Student instructions:

1.. Using the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the text excerpts below (or the entire text of Letter III),  identify three key quotes or words  and find artwork that connects to chosen text.  You can use the images below as a starting point, but don't feel limited to these.  The Smithsonian has an amazing and extensive collection.  Take time to use the search function and explore the collection.  You have all period to do so.  Be original.

2.  By class tomorrow, post on the google classroom your text excerpts and accompanying three works of art.  The text can be a whole sentence or just a few key words.  The works of art can support, refute, or simply connect to some aspect of the text and the idea of what it means to be an American.  Be sure to include the title, artist, and date for each artwork.  Your artwork doesn't have to come from the Revolutionary time period.  The important thing is that you use your critical reading and thinking skills to make a connection between the text and the art work.

3.  Tomorrow we will have a class discussion based on the images and excerpts.  Be prepared to share your thinking on your choices with the class.


Tips:

As always, remember to consider speaker, audience, and purpose.  Who is speaking? To whom is he appealing? Why? 

Not sure where to start?  Find what you think are the ten most important words in the passage.  Narrow it down to the top three.

Based on our studies so far, what  are the different groups, ethnicities, races, religious affiliations make up the population at this time?  Which of these does Crevecouer include?  Leave out? 

How did these people come to be in America?   Does that matter in Crevecouer's writing?




--------------------------------

"Letters From An American Farmer"

by J. Hector St. John De Crevecoeur

"What then is the American, this new man?...He is an American, who, leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He has become an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all races are melted into a new race of man, whose labors and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world. Americans are the western pilgrims...

"After a foreigner from any part of Europe is arrived, and become a citizen; let him devoutly listen to the voice of our great parent, which says to him, "Welcome to my shores, distressed European; bless the hour in which thou didst see my verdant fields, my fair navigable rivers, and my green mountains!--If thou wilt work, I have bread for thee; if thou wilt be honest, sober, and industrious, I have greater rewards to confer on thee--ease and independence. I will give thee fields to feed and clothe thee; a comfortable fireside to sit by, and tell thy children by what means thou hast prospered; and a decent bed to repose on. I shall endow thee beside with the immunities of a freeman. If thou wilt carefully educate thy children, teach them gratitude to God, and reverence to that government, that philanthropic government, which has collected here so many men and made them happy. I will also provide for thy progeny; and to every good man this ought to be the most holy, the most powerful, the most earnest wish he can possibly form, as well as the most consolatory prospect when he dies. Go thou and work and till; thou shalt prosper, provided thou be just, grateful, and industrious"  (Letter III, 1782).


Mike Burns
27
 

What is the legacy of the 19th century whaling industry?

A collection designed to introduce students to the 19th century whaling industry- one of the biggest industries of the 19th century and the industry which supported industrialization.

#TeachingInquiry

Erin Becker
42
 

What Makes a First Lady?

In this collection, students will answer the question "What Makes a First Lady?" by comparing and analyzing images of various First Ladies. They will also think critically about their definition of the First Lady as compared to that of the President and the differences in medium (painting, photography, video) artists use to represent a First Lady. One of the final activities will require students to find an image of a First Lady not shown in the collection to test their definitions.

This activity is based on the "Reading Portraiture" Guide for Educators created by the National Portrait Gallery. The guide can be found at the end of the collection.

Alexander Graves
12
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with a Historical Photograph

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with a photograph from the National Portrait Gallery. Once you have examined the photograph and answered the questions, view the original resource and the short video with a curator to check and see if your interpretation was correct. How does viewing the photograph with the museum label change your interpretation?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.
Ashley Naranjo
3
 

What Makes You Say That?: Interpretation with Justification Routine with an Artwork

This collection uses the Harvard Project Zero Visible Thinking routine, highlighting interpretation with justification. The strategy is paired with an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Once you have examined the artwork and answered the questions, view an archived webinar with a museum educator to compare your interpretation. How does viewing the artwork with the museum label change your interpretation? How did what you noticed in the artwork compare with what the educators shared?

Suggestions for teachers regarding visual clues for this image are in the "Notes to Other Users" section.

#visiblethinking

Ashley Naranjo
3
697-720 of 757 Collections