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Found 3,711,354 Resources

Stone Implement

NMNH - Anthropology Dept.
CHERT FLAKE TOOL, CONCAVE ROUNDED SEGMENT (REFER TO MITCHELL, S.R. 1949:54). (SRJONES 11/96)

Alchemilla aphanoides L. f.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Unonopsis rigida R.E. Fr.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Republic F-105 Thunderchief Family; Wars and Conflicts, Vietnam War, General. [photograph]

National Air and Space Museum Archives
View of Republic F-105 Thunderchief aircraft at Takhli Royal Thai Air Force Base, circa 1967.

Mintin Asbury Chrysler (1871-1963)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Mintin Asbury Chrysler (1871-1963), whose research focused on conifers, was a professor at Rutgers, 1923-1942, which renamed the Cook College Chrysler Herbarium in his honor.

Nevin Melancthon Fenneman (1865-1945)

Smithsonian Institution Archives
Geologist Nevin Melancthon Fenneman (1865-1945) was a professor at University of Cincinnati, 1907-1937; he was president of Association of American Geographers (1918) and Geological Society of America (1935).

The Willard Hotel

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Trees, Flowers, and River in Washington, DC

Smithsonian Institution Archives

Map of Max Freiherr von Oppenheim Expedition to the Persian Gulf, 1893

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Joseph Upton's Catalogue of the Herzfeld Archive.

Finding aid available in the Archives Department and on Internet http://www.asia.si.edu/archives/finding_aids/herzfeld.html#series5

Map caption in German reads, "Übersichtsskizze von Dr. Max Freiherrn v. Oppenheim's Reise Vom Mittelmeer zum Persischen Golf, 1893."

The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli (Iraq): Squeeze (unpublished), Middle Persian or Parthian Version

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
- Title is provided by Xavier Courouble, FSg Archives cataloger, based on Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Part I; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 1978." and Joseph Upton's Finding Aid.

Paper squeezes related primarly to two expeditions to Paikuli (Iraq), in 1911 and 1913, as well an excavation campaign carried out on site by Ernst Herzfeld in 1923.

Finding aid available in the Archives Department and on Internet http://www.asia.si.edu/archives/finding_aids/herzfeld.html#series6

- Original handwritten annotation reads, "."

- Additional information from staff, based on Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads."Inventory number of the squeeze according to the notes left by Herzfeld is Pars. or Pahl.."

- Additional information from Joseph Upton's Finding Aid reads, "No. 126 ([neg.] 4432) Parsik or Pahlavik."

- Information from Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication reads, "The ruin of the Sassanian monument of Paikuli is situated close to the southern ascent to the [Paikuli] pass. Originally, the monument consisted of a solid square tower. Four identical colossal busts of one and the same king of kings were built into the four walls. The western wall bore a large Middle-Persian inscription (eight rows of blocks, with a total of 46 lines), whereas the eastern wall bore the Parthian version of this (seven rows, with a total of 42 lines, all of them surviving in a fragmentary state. The subject of the inscription, carefully carved and written in perspective, is the quarrel over the succession, between Narseh (293-303) and Varahrān (293). In the course of his first two expeditions, in 1911 and 1913, E. Herzfeld had discovered a total of 97 inscribed blocks (54 Middle Persian, 43 Parthian). On his last visit to Paikuli in 1923, Herzfeld excavated the site and found 30 additional blocks (20 Middle Persian, 10 Parthian), which raise the total number of surviving blocks to 133." [Helmut Humbach and Prods O. Skjærvø's publication, 1980: "The Sassanian Inscription of Paikuli; Supplement to Herzfeld's Paikuli. Wiesbaden: Reichert; pp.13-16."]

Coprosma kauensis A. Heller

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Carex brevipes

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Carex lurida Wahlenb.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Cyperus sp.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Naqsh-i Rustam (Iran): Tomb of Darius I, Upper Register: View of Reliefs Depicting King's Attendants [graphic]

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives
Ernst Herzfeld first visited Naqsh-i Rustam in November 1905 during his expedition return from the Assur (Kalat Schergat, Iraq) excavation. During the two last months of 1923 as well as early March 1924, in addition of his work on the terrace of Persepolis, Herzfeld spent time at Naqsh-i Rustam checking the inscriptions. In 1928, the architect Friedrich Krefter joined Herzfeld in Persia, in an expedition funded by the Notgemeinschaft der Deutschen Wissenschaft, to complete various measured plans and drawings in Persepolis, Pasargadae, and Naqsh-i Rustam. On March 1, 1931, now under the auspices of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, excavations at Persepolis were begun. Ultimately, in 1933, attention was directed to Naqsh-i Rustam, where Herzfeld traced the outer enclosure of the site and copied the inscription on the tomb of Darius I. Ernst Herzfeld left Persepolis permanently in Spring 1934.

Finding aid available in the Archives Department and on Internet http://www.asia.si.edu/archives/finding_aids/herzfeld.html#series4

Handwritten notes on related blueprint reads, "Naqsh i Rustam, tomb of Darius, left side, joins 2240 (above)."

Additional information from Finding Aid reads, "Subseries 4.2: Photo File 2 (2Vols.). 'Pre-Achaemenian.' Subseries 4.2.2: vol. 2, No. 179 (Negative Number: 2241). Naqsh-i Rustam. Tomb of Darius. Left side. Joins No.-178."

Rhynchospora duckei

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Plexechinus nordenskjoldi Mortensen

NMNH - Invertebrate Zoology Dept.
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