Skip to Content

Found 124,349 Resources

"American Extra Gun Powder" Tin

National Museum of American History
Small, cylindrical retail tin bearing a black letterpress-printed, blue paper label around its body for "AMERICAN EXTRA / GUN POWDER / PREPARED FOR SALE BY / M. GIBSON / Successor to B. Moseley / BOSTON, MASS." Flat top and bottom of container are folded over body, the top cut with a small pouring hole covered by a thin metal strip soldered at its ends under which a removable, triangular metal piece can be slipped to close the container. No other marks. Gunpowder inside.

"American Victory March"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the composistion "American Victory March," by Charles A. Ware. It was published by M.D. Swisher in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1898.

"An Opening Drill" From El Paso Herald Post

National Museum of American History

"Anchors Aweigh"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Anchors Aweigh," by Capt. Alfred H. Miles, U.S.N. (Ret.) and Charles A. Zimmerman. It was published by Robbins Music Corporation in New York, New York in 1907.

"And Away We Go"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "And Away We Go!" by Charles and Henry Tobias. It was published by Tobey Music Company in New York, New York in 1952. The cover features an image of American comedian, actor, writer, composer and conductor Jackie Gleason (1916-1987), who featured this song.

"And the Angels Sing"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "And the Angels Sing," with lyrics by Johnny Mercer and music by Ziggie Elman. It was published by Bregman, Vocco and Coon Inc. in New York, New York in 1939. The cover features images of Johnny Mercer, Ziggie Elman, and Benny Goodman, who introduced and featured this song with his orchestra.

"Angel Holding Trumpet" Engine Panel Painting

National Museum of American History
In the nineteenth century, volunteer fire companies often commissioned paintings to decorate their hand-pumped fire engines for parades, competitions, and community events. Sometimes framed with elaborate carvings, they adorned the tall air chamber located at the middle or rear of a pumper. The paintings would often feature patriotic, heroic, or allegorical images to associate the volunteer companies with these lofty ideals. This Angel Holding Trumpet panel painting was made by an unknown artist in the late 19th century. The character could possibly be a personification of Fame, celebrating the triumphing of the fire company.

"Angela Mia (My Angel)"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Angela Mia (My Angel)," with music by Erno Rapee and lyrics by Lew Pollack. It was published by DeSylva, Brown and Henderson, Inc. in New York, New York in 1928. This song was featured in the 1928 Fox Film Corporation transitional sound film Street Angel, directed by Frank Borzage and starred Janet Gaynor, Charles Farrell, and Alberto Rabagliati. This film featured a Movietone soundtrack with a recording of this song. The cover features an image of Janet Gaynor and Charles Farrell.

"Angels of Mercy"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Angels of Mercy," with words and music by Irving Berlin. It was published by American National Red Cross in New York, New York in 1941. As indicated on the cover, “written expressly for and dedicated to American Red Cross.”

"Anthem for Easter, Psalm 122, All Saints L.M."

National Museum of American History

"April Showers"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song “April Showers,” with Lyrics by B. D. DeSylva and music by Louis Silvers. It was published by Sunshine Music Company, Inc. in New York, New York in 1921. This song was featured in the Broadway musical Bombo, with book and lyrics by Harold R. Atteridge and music by Sigmund Romberg, which opened on October 6, 1921 at the Jolson Theatre and starred Al Jolson and Janet Adair. There is an image of American singer, comedian, and actor Al Jolson (1886-1950) on the cover.

"Arapaho" dress silk; Mallinson's American Indian series

National Museum of American History
A length of the "Arapaho" design dress silk; Mallinson's American Indian series, with small samples of 6 additional colorways of this design attached with a Mallinson tag at the upper right corner. The manufacturer's number for this fabric quality (Pussy Willow) is #5459. Pussy Willow was a long time Mallinson trade name for an unweighted, pure dye plain weave silk with a soft hand.. At the time it was popular it was considered similar to a generic fabric type called "radium". This is a large sample with small colorway samples attached. Large sample is Colorway #9. The design is the Arapaho tribe design from the American Indian series; an irregular, curving vertical stripe layout of beadwork strips and feathers. The large sample colorway has a light blue ground with patterning in dark blue, blue-green, orange, red-brown, yellow, black, and white.

Mallinson's American Indian series followed the "National Parks" and "Wonder Caves of America" designs, and illustrates the company's continuing interest in using American themes, and in utilizing the collections of New York area museums for research and inspiration.

"Arcady"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Arcady," with words and music by Al Jolson and Buddy G. DeSylva. It was published by Leo Feist, Inc. in New York, New York in 1923. This song was featured in the return engagement of the Broadway musical Bombo, which opened on May 14, 1923 at the Winter Garden and ran for 32 performances. There is an image of American singer, comedian, and actor Al Jolson (1886-1950) on the cover.

"Are You Having Any Fun?"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Are You Having Any Fun?" with lyrics by Jack Yellen and music by Sammy Fain. It was published by Max Dreyfus in New York, New York in 1939. This song was featured in the 1939 Broadway review George White’s Scandals.

"Are You Lonesone To-Night"

National Museum of American History
This sheet music is for the song "Are You Lonesome To-Night?" with words and music by Ray Turk and Lou Handman. It was published by Irving Berlin, Inc. in New York, New York in 1927. The cover features an image of a woman sitting in front of a moonlit window.

"Armenian Public Radio" Brings Nirvana Attitude to the Folklife Festival

Smithsonian Magazine

California is known as a melting pot of immigrants. People from Western Europe, Asia and Latin America are among the most visible in California's cultural landscape.

But Los Angeles also happens to hold the largest population of Armenians outside of Armenia. One group of Armenian musicians is bringing the traditional sound of that community to Washington, D.C. for Smithsonian's 2016 Folklife Festival, Sounds of California. Armenian Public Radio will play two concerts on the National Mall during the festival.

“We're all first-generation born in the U.S.,” says Mher Vahakn Ajamian, percussionist and guitar player. “All of our parents were born not in the U.S., they were born in the Middle East. Lebanon or Syria.”

Most Armenians in California arrived as they fled various wars during the 20th century. “My grandfather was born in Syria. The reason my grandfather was born in Syria was the Armenian genocide,” when the Ottoman government that later became Turkey systematically exterminated around 1.5 million Armenians starting in 1915.

“My great-grandfather escaped during the genocide and ended up in Syria. My grandfather gets married, moves to Lebanon, has my dad and my aunt. They came to the U.S. due to the invasion of Lebanon in the Lebanese Civil War.”

Armenian-American culture and music has a distinctly multicultural flavor due to the experiences of so many refugees spending years (or even generations) in other countries before settling here.

Traditional Armenian folk music was all around as Ajamian was growing up. As was other music from the family's history. “At weddings, we also listen to Arabic music and Greek music being played. You'll hear the Gypsy Kings and Latin music.” Ajamian's father grew up listening to Pink Floyd and Simon and Garfunkel while in Lebanon.

Armenian Public Radio, a trio consisting of Ajamian along with Ryan Demirjian, guitarist and Saro Koujakian on lead vocals and guitar, exclusively performs traditional Armenian folk songs with a modern American sensibility and on modern acoustic guitars. “The Nirvana Unplugged album, the Alice in Chains Unplugged album. Those are things we listened to over and over again,” says Ajamian. “What we want to be is Armenian music, but sounding like Nirvana playing.”

The easy comparison with Armenian Public Radio is the well-known metal band, System of a Down, led by fellow L.A. County-raised Armenian-American, Serj Tankian. “System of a Down did some great things for our culture, especially as far as getting recognition for the genocide,” says Ajamian. “But I'm not into heavy metal. The other two [band members] listen to them, some albums more than others. I don't know that it has influenced us musically. The Armenian musicians who influenced [SOAD] also influenced us. Definitely in our audience, most people our age here and even a little bit younger, they love System of a Down.”

Armenian folk music is filled with references to the nation's history. During the past century, much of that music evolved with lyrics about what happened starting in 1915. But Armenian Public Radio prefers to maintain a different attitude. “Are we affected by the genocide, yeah, obviously,” says Ajamian. “But we also come from the philosophy that our history goes back thousands of years with folklore and tradition. As much as the genocide history is important, I don't want our entire cultural narrative to become about that.”

“We're a very proud culture.”

Armenian Public Radio performs July 7 and July 8 at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival for its "Sound of California" program, running from June 29 to July 4 and July 7 to July, 10 on the National Mall. Other performers include Quetzal, an “East LA Chicana rock group;” Grupo Nuu Yuku, a large ensemble of Oaxacan Mixteco immigrant farmworkers from the Madera area; for a total of 16 world renowned bands and artistic organizations.

"Armistice Silk," Beige

National Museum of American History

"Armistice Silk," Brown

National Museum of American History

"Armistice Silk," Etruscan brown; World War I

National Museum of American History
Plain weave Cartridge Cloth silk sample length. Known as "Armistice Silk", converted silk Cartridge or powder bag cloth, Quality D; A sample piece of the 18,000,000 yards of surplus World War I cartridge cloth, which has been dyed and finished for the trade. Sold by the Salvage Board for 86 cents per yard. Color: Etruscan (brown). Plain weave; silk noils warp and weft yarns; dyed a reddish-brown.

"Armistice Silk," Freedom Blue; World War I

National Museum of American History
This length of converted silk cartridge cloth, called "Armistice Silk"; is a sample of the 18 million yards of surplus American-made cartridge bag silk cloth owned by the US War Dept. at the end of World War I. Originally used to make the bags that held the powder charge for heavy artillery, it was finished and dyed for the "cutting-up" (ready-to-wear clothing) trade after the war, and sold by the Salvage Board for 76 cents per yard. This sample was dyed "Freedom blue."

"Armistice Silk," Paisley prints

National Museum of American History

"Armistice Silk," Paisley prints

National Museum of American History

"Armistice Silk," Paisley prints

National Museum of American History

"Armistice Silk," Wild Rose; World War I

National Museum of American History
This sample length of Quality C silk noil Cartridge or powder bag cloth was dyed and finished for the cutting-up (garment manufacturing) trade. The refinished fabric was called "Armistice Silk," part of the 18 million yards of surplus cartridge cloth at the end of World War I. The fabric was sold by the Salvage board at $1.20 per yard. Color: Wild Rose.
49-72 of 124,349 Resources