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"At daylight the miserable man was carried to an oak..." from the series Searching for California Hang Trees

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Through meticulous research, Gonzales-Day documented approximately 350 lynching incidents that occurred in California between 1850 and 1935, most of which involved victims of Mexican descent. To create the series Searching for California Hang Trees, the artist visited many of these sites and captured the likeness of trees that may have borne witness to these events. Gonzales-Day’s landscapes unearth traces of this little-known history.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art, 2013

"Attention the Universe..." telegraph message

National Museum of American History
This telegraph message, "Attention the Universe by kingdoms right wheel", was sent by Samuel F. B. Morse during a private demonstration of his telegraph system on January 24, 1838. This message predates the more famous "What hath God wrought" by about six years. The command refers to a military maneuver, appropriate since the demonstration was for artist and soldier General Thomas S. Cummings.

"Aurora" Mt. Desert

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"Aurora" Mt. Desert

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"Aurora," Mt. Desert

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"BLUE DOG" Shark

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"Babe" Didrikson

National Portrait Gallery
Born Port Arthur, Texas

All-around athlete "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias freely admitted that she always "had the urge to do things better than anyone else." That intense competitive drive, combined with superb natural talent, made her one of the top athletes in American sports history. Named Mildred Didrikson at birth, she was later dubbed "Babe" by those who likened her baseball prowess to that of Babe Ruth. A basketball star in high school, Didrikson went on to excel at track and field, capturing first place in five events at the AAU Championships in 1932. At the Olympics that year, she took home two gold medals with record-setting performances in the javelin throw and eighty-meter hurdles. Yet it was in golf that Didrikson left her most impressive mark. By the time she helped establish the Ladies Professional Golf Association in 1948, she had won forty-one amateur titles. She later claimed thirty-one more with the LPGA.

"Babe" Didrikson

National Portrait Gallery
Born Port Arthur, Texas

All-around athlete "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias freely admitted that she always "had the urge to do things better than anyone else." That intense competitive drive, combined with superb natural talent, made her one of the top athletes in American sports history. Named Mildred Didrikson at birth, she was later dubbed "Babe" by those who likened her baseball prowess to that of Babe Ruth. A basketball star in high school, Didrikson went on to excel at track and field, capturing first place in five events at the AAU Championships in 1932. At the Olympics that year, she took home two gold medals, with record-setting performances in the javelin throw and eighty-meter hurdles. Yet it was in golf that Didrikson left her most impressive mark. By the time she helped establish the Ladies Professional Golf Association in 1948, she had won forty-one amateur titles. She later claimed thirty-one more with the LPGA.

Born Port Arthur, Texas

Perhaps no athlete has excelled at more sports than did Babe Didrikson. She caught the public’s attention when she won two gold medals during the 1932 Summer Olympic Games—in the javelin throw and eighty-meter hurdles. She then became a professional athlete, competing in basketball, baseball, swimming, lacrosse, soccer, handball, fencing, cycling, and ice skating. During this period, she famously declared, “The Babe is here. Who’s coming in second?”

Didrikson started playing golf in 1933, and in 1947 she became the only American woman to win the British amateur crown. In 1948, she helped to organize the Ladies Professional Golf Association. In professional women’s golf, she won eighty-two tournaments, including fourteen in a row. Named Woman Athlete of the Year six times by the Associated Press, Didrikson was a pioneer in women’s sports. She remains one of the United States’ greatest all-around athletes.

"Babe" Didrikson

National Portrait Gallery

"Balustrades des Orchestres de la barriere du Trone"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for a panel articulated at the upper section with three distinct vertical rectangle sections, each separated by a thin red line, and decorated with abstracted patterns of grey, black and gold. Below this section is a thin horizontal band decorated with red squares and dots. Below, partially shown, is the lower portion of the panel with a very simple, unadorned design consisting of a white rectangle, bordered in a thin red line and surrounded by a cream background.

"Balustrades des Orchestres du Grand Carre aux champs-Elysees (1833)"

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Design for two different red-bordered square panels. Right: Dark green square with a diamond-shaped white insert, decorated with a blue arabesque design. Left: Dark purple square with an octagonal white insert, decorated with a blue arabesque design.

"Barboncito, Chief of the Navajo Tribe in New Mexico" before 1870

National Anthropological Archives
Digital surrogate produced from reference copy print

Date not later than 1870 (date of Barboncito's death); possibly 1866-1870.

Cf. BAE negative 2441, "Barban Cito or Little Beard," Jackson Catalog Number 786, (possibly by Shindler 1869, but not in Shindler Catalog, published 1867). [But there are some photos later than 1869 in that Catalog-P.F.] Seems not to resemble this man--at least no mustache. Correct spelling of name is presumably from "Barboncito," from barbon, 'full-bearded man.'

"The" Barboncito died in 1870, according to J. Lee Correll (Head of Field Research, Navaho Land Claims, Window Rock, Arizona.) who visited here 6/10/66. Therefore Negative 2441 (a young man) could not possibly be he, but could be his son.

Copy (5/66) from original photograph lent by City Art Museum of St Louis, Missouri, received by them in "[Charles] Wimar's collection," purchased in 1947 from Mrs Wimar A. Becker (N. M. correspondence Number 266,587).

Source print Navaho 4689 (negative 2442) is on an N. Brown & Son carte. The other two photographs in that series (negatives 2413-A & -B) appear to have also been taken by Brown & Son. Comparison of props, style and general appearance suggests that negatives 55,766-55,771 were also taken by Brown. N. Brown & Son was a prominent studio opened in Santa Fe between 1866 and 1868 and last recorded in 1872.--pjf 1/78

Blackmore collection version is retouched or painted version. Image has initials, "E.H.M." Mount has notation, "Barboncite Chief of Navajoes by Mr Shepard". Shepard could be artist or photographer. In addition, Blackmore version is on a Gardner mount. --pjf 12/77

Blackmore Collection #: A17/1481

Black and white copy negative

City Art Museum Number 5426:46. Original sepia print is 5 1/8" x 3 1/4" on slightly larger mount. The subject above is written in red ink on the reverse. In another hand in pencil is written, "Taken by Wimar," but this seems improbable.

"Battery Wagner the Morning Following the Repulse" sketch from The True Story of Glory Continues

National Museum of American History

"Battery Wagner the Morning Following the Repulse" painted sketch from artist's sketchbook used in the documentary The True Story of Glory Continues. This is part of a set of sketches from "A Swamp Angel's Sketchbook,” which contains concepts for the film Glory.

Glory was the first film to illustrate the involvement of African American soldiers in the Civil War. The film follows the story of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, the first African American Union regiment organized in the North during the Civil War, and culminates in the Battle at Fort Wagner.

"Battery Wagner the Morning Following the Repulse" sketch in The True Story of Glory Continues

National Museum of American History

"Battery Wagner the Morning Following the Repulse" sketch from artist's sketchbook used in the documentary The True Story of Glory Continues. This sketch depicts three soldiers talking in the foreground viewing the causalities of the battle, with Charlestown shown in the distance. This is part of a set of sketches from "A Swamp Angel's Sketchbook,” which contains concepts for the film Glory.

Glory was the first film to illustrate the involvement of African American soldiers in the Civil War. The film follows the story of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, the first African American Union regiment organized in the North during the Civil War, and culminates in the Battle at Fort Wagner.

"Battle at Jinzhou"

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

"Battle at Port Arthur"

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

"Battle of Lexington, 19th April, 1775" Engine Panel Painting

National Museum of American History
In the nineteenth century, volunteer fire companies often commissioned paintings to decorate their hand-pumped fire engines for parades, competitions, and community events. Sometimes framed with elaborate carvings, they adorned the tall air chamber located at the middle or rear of a pumper. The paintings would often feature patriotic, heroic, or allegorical images to associate the volunteer companies with these lofty ideals.

This engine panel painting came from the Lexington Fire Engine Company No. 7 of New York City. The volunteer company was active from December 26, 1849 until September 18, 1865. The painting was signed by artist M. Betsch, and was completed around 1849. The painting is the artist’s interpretation of the skirmish between the American militia and British troops on April 19, 1775 on the Lexington Green. This military engagement is characterized as the first battle of the Revolutionary War. The Lexington Fire Company used this painting to link their company to the patriotic deeds of their predecessors. This painting and its companion piece (object 2005.0233.0301) would have adorned the sides of the company’s engine.

"Beauty in the Guise of a Man" (Danso bijin)

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

"Beer-Drinking Polka" by Max Baca and Flaco Jiménez from Legends & Legacies

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The music of GRAMMY-winning conjunto artists Max Baca and Flaco Jiménez is steeped in the traditions of their families and region.

"Belgian Village" a Century of Progress--Chicago

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"Beluga Hunter and Dwellings, Lower Kuskokvim, Alaska" n.d. Lithograph/Photomechanical

National Anthropological Archives
Ching-hsien's note.

Published: Petroff, Ivan; "Report on the Population, Industries, & Resources of Ak"; Wash, 1884; Pl III; Signed: H (Monogram)

Colored pencil Watercolor lithograph and photomechanical

Lithograph of Painting of Two Men, One Holding Paddle; Both In Costume Near Kayak at Water's Edge; Sod Houses, Storage Structures, and Drying Racks Behind Them; Mountains in Distance

"Benefit Foundation" Poster

Smithsonian American Art Museum

"Benjamin Franklin with a Loaf of Bread" Engine Panel Painting

National Museum of American History
In the nineteenth century, volunteer fire companies often commissioned paintings to decorate their hand-pumped fire engines for parades, competitions, and community events. Sometimes framed with elaborate carvings, they adorned the tall air chamber located at the middle or rear of a pumper. The paintings would often feature patriotic, heroic, or allegorical images to associate the volunteer companies with these lofty ideals.

This fire engine panel came from the Franklin Engine Company No. 12 of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that was active as a hand engine company from 1792 until 1863 when it acquired a steam fire engine. It operated as a steam fire engine company until 1871 when Philadelphia’s paid firefighting department was established. The painting “Franklin with Loaf of Bread” is attributed to David Rent Etter and dates to around 1830. The painting depicts the young Benjamin Franklin’s arrival in Philadelphia in 1723. As recounted in his autobiography, he mistakenly bought more bread than he could eat and gave the extra loaves to a poor woman and child. Benjamin Franklin was well known for organizing the first volunteer fire company in Philadelphia, and his image and his name were popular among the city’s fire companies. By invoking Franklin, volunteer firemen linked themselves to the progenitor of their trade, as well as someone who played a key role in the Revolution and securing America’s freedom. This painting and its companion piece (object 2005.0233.0307) would have adorned either side of the company’s engine.
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