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American Art in a Global Context: Crossing the Seas

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "American Art in a Global Context" Friday, September 29, 2006 Session II: Crossing the Seas Moderator: Michael Hatt, Yale Center for British Art Presenters: Kevin Muller, San Francisco Art Institute, "Queen Anne and the 'Four Indian Kings': A Transatlantic Dialogue" Jennifer Roberts, Harvard University, "Copley's Cargo" Margaretta M. Lovell, University of California, Berkeley, "Trophy Heads: The Public Use of Portrait Painting in the Late Eighteenth Century" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

American Art in a Global Context: Culture, Commerce, and Propaganda

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Symposium: "American Art in a Global Context" Saturday, September 30, 2006 Session VII: Culture, Commerce, and Propaganda Moderator: Laura Katzman, Randolph-Macon Woman's College Presenters: Sergio Cortesini, independent scholar, "Mussolini's Artists Across the American Scene" Helen A. Harrison, Pollock-Krasner House & Study Center, "Pollock in Europe/Europe in Pollock" John Bowles, Indiana University, "African American Culture in Japan: A Transnational Dialogue" Martha Bayles, The Weekly Standard, "The Ugly Americans: Losing the Global Culture War" This three-day symposium looked at American art in a global context—from circum-Atlantic migrations in the eighteenth century to European training and travel in the late nineteenth century; from the export of U.S. culture and media in the twentieth century to the impact of immigration and globalization on the nation's visual arts in the new millennium. For more information: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2006/.

Episode 3 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "Aurora Borealis" by Frederic Edwin Church. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=4806

Episode 4 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "The Lord Is My Shepherd" by Eastman Johnson. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=11494

Episode 1 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode is an introduction. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/

Episode 5 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "A Visit from the Old Mistress" by Winslow Homer. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=10737

Episode 2 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "The Iron Mine, Port Henry, New York" by Homer Dodge Martin. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=16373

Episode 6 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "Surrender of a Confederate Soldier" by Julian Scott. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=84149

Episode 7 - Podcast: The Civil War and American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In this podcast, curator Eleanor Jones Harvey discusses 6 featured paintings from "The Civil War and American Art" exhibition. This episode looks at "The Girl I Left Behind Me" by Eastman Johnson. "The Civil War and American Art" examines how America's artists represented the impact of the Civil War and its aftermath. The exhibition follows the conflict from palpable unease on the eve of war, to heady optimism that it would be over with a single battle, to a growing realization that this conflict would not end quickly and a deepening awareness of issues surrounding emancipation and the need for reconciliation. Genre and landscape painting captured the transformative impact of the war, not traditional history painting. Exhibition website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2012/art_civil_war/ Artwork: http://americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=11492

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 1 - Welcome (Day 1)

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Elizabeth Broun, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director, Smithsonian American Art Museum Johnnetta Cole, Director, National Museum of African Art

Session 1 - Effects of the Civil War on American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This symposium examines the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on American landscape and genre painting, along with the period's new medium of photography. The program is free and open to the public, and is organized in conjunction with the exhibition The Civil War and American Art.

Session 3 - Effects of the Civil War on American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This symposium examines the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on American landscape and genre painting, along with the period's new medium of photography. The program is free and open to the public, and is organized in conjunction with the exhibition The Civil War and American Art.

Session 2 - Effects of the Civil War on American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This symposium examines the impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on American landscape and genre painting, along with the period's new medium of photography. The program is free and open to the public, and is organized in conjunction with the exhibition The Civil War and American Art.

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 4 - Primitivism and Modernism

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Tanya Sheehan, Associate Professor of Art, Colby College James Smalls, Professor of Art History and Theory, University of Maryland, Baltimore County "Féral Benga: African Muse of Modernism" Mia Bagneris, Assistant Professor of Art History, Newcomb Art Department, Tulane University "Fighting the Fetish for Fétiches: Africa in the Work of Palmer Hayden" Nicholas Miller, PhD Candidate in Art History, Northwestern University "'To Paint His Own People': William H. Johnson's Avant-Garde Gambits and the Orientalized Black Female Body"

American Art in Dialogue with Africa - 3 - Nineteenth-Century Portraiture

Smithsonian American Art Museum
This two-day symposium examines the role of Africa and its diaspora in the development of art of the United States, from nineteenth-century portraiture to American modernism; from the Harlem Renaissance to the contemporary art world. Chair: Renée Ater, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Maryland, College Park Anne Lafont, Associate Professor of Art History, Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée "Paris--Philadelphia: African Figures around 1800, or Portrait of Yarrow as a Mameluke" Shawn Michelle Smith, Associate Professor of Visual and Critical Studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago "Augustus Washington's Liberian Daguerreotypes and the Civil Contract of Photography" Camara Dia Holloway, Assistant Professor of Art History, University of Delaware "'Aglow in the Darkest Vistas': Africa, Racial Fantasy, and the Modernist Self-Fashioning of F. Holland Day"

"Exploring James Castle" Panel Discussion - Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
In conjunction with the exhibition "Untitled: The Art of James Castle," exhibition curator Nicholas Bell moderates a discussion with Lynne Cooke, senior curator, National Gallery of Art; Jacqueline Crist, managing partner, James Castle Collection and Archive; Frank Del Deo, managing partner, James Castle Collection and Archive and, member, Del Deo & Barzune LLC Art Advisory; and Leslie Umberger, curator of folk and self-taught art, as they explore Castle’s remarkable artistic vision.

"Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth.

"Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen" at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Trevor Paglen blurs the lines between art, science, and investigative journalism to construct unfamiliar and at times unsettling ways to see and interpret the world around us. Inspired by the landscape tradition, he captures the same horizon seen by American photographers Timothy O’Sullivan in the nineteenth century and Ansel Adams in the twentieth.

East-West Interchanges in American Art: John P. Bowles

Smithsonian American Art Museum
John P. Bowles, assistant professor of African-American art, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill "New Negro on the Pacific Rim: Sargent Johnson's Afro-Asian Sculptures" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

Ecuentros I: New Approaches: Latin/American Art and its Intersections

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Part 1 of "Encuentros: Artistic Exchange between the U.S. and Latin America" Session 1: New Approaches: Latin/American Art and its Intersections. Speaker 1: Katherine Manthorne, professor of modern art of the Americas, City University of New York Graduate Center "Ambas Américas/Two Americas: A Proposal for Studying the Nineteenth Century". Speaker 2: Deborah Cullen, director of curatorial programs, El Museo del Barrio "Contact Zones: Places, Spaces, and Other Test Cases"E. Speaker 3: Carmen Ramos, curator for Latino art, Smithsonian American Art Museum "Inside and Out: The Latino Presence in American Art". This two-day symposium examines the exchange of artistic ideas and techniques between Latin America and the U.S. and explores the dialogue and influence that has developed as a result. Speakers include Valerie Fraser of the University of Essex, Itala Schmelz of the Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil, Edward Sullivan of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, Katherine Manthorne of City University of New York Graduate Center, and artist Luis Camnitzer.

East-West Interchanges in American Art: Nicole Fabricand-Person

Smithsonian American Art Museum
Nicole Fabricand-Person, Japanese Art Specialist, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University "Between Two Worlds: The Influence of Images of Racial Stereotyping on Japanese Art and Culture in the Late Nineteenth Century" "A Long and Tumultuous Relationship" East-West Interchanges in American Art October 1--2, 2009 This two-day symposium at the Smithsonian American Art Museum explored the complicated interactions between American and Asian artists and visual traditions from the eighteenth century to the present. The history of American art has long been discussed primarily in terms of European training and influence. When scholars have looked eastward, they often have considered the Asian influence on art of the United States as a unidirectional and limited development, suggesting that Asian culture was monolithic and unchanging while characterizing American artists as dynamic and original in their ability to absorb and meld the best of diverse global outlooks. For more information, visit the website: http://www.americanart.si.edu/research/symposia/2009/

Picture This: Google Art Comes To American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
ThumbnailIn December 2011 Google brought its special panorama camera to photograph American Art's galleries as part of the Google Art Project. Here the photographer is going up and down our Kogod Courtyard as part of the project's Museum View.

In Conversation with American Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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