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Found 849 Collections

 

Dorothy Wright Liebes

Dorothy Wright Liebes (1893-1972) was a textile designer who is known for having developed a distinctive look, including vibrant colors and patterns that became synonymous with the Modernist movement in California in the 1940s and 1950s. Widely traveled, Liebes often drew inspiration from the places she visited around the world for her unique textile designs. Her designs often include bold colors associated with California Modernism. Liebes experimented with materials, aside from traditional materials such as silk and cotton, she was also know to incorporate cellophane and plastics as well as metals and metallic yarns into her designs. Fiercely determined and career driven, when her husband Leon Liebes suggested she quit working she divorced him, choosing herself and her career over the marriage. Her designs were so successful and sought after that they inspired many imitations.

Contributions of Liebes can be found in the Archives of American Art, the National Portrait Gallery as well as the Copper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, this collection included examples across the Smithsonian but primarily focuses on content from the Cooper Hewitt.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Mandy Horton
70
 

Lanette Scheeline

Lanette Scheeline (1910-2001) was an American textile and wallpaper designer. Designs by Scheeline were often custom and created using block printing, intaglio and machine printing techniques. She also experimented with printing designs on Japanese paper. Her designs were largely influenced by natural forms and botany, which can be seen in this collection. Scheeline's working career overlapped with World War II, during which she worked in a shipyard, she returned to her career as as designer after the war.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Mandy Horton
58
 

Elaine Lustig Cohen

Elaine Lustig Cohen (1927-2016) built a career specializing in book cover design, museum catalogs and building signage, most of which she inherited from her husband's business after his early death at age 40. Cohen was never formally trained as a designer, and worked as a production artist for her husband, after his death she took over the business and built a successful and highly regarded career. Much of the work she did in this phase included graphic design and signage for architectural spaces, having taken over a project for Philip Johnson upon her husband's death. In addition to signage Cohen's design work included idnity design and advertising as well as museum catalog designs, though most prolifically she produced work as book designer. Cohen closed her business in 1969, choosing instead to focus on painting, though she continued to take design jobs occasionally from clients and she designed catalogs for the rare book company, Ex-Libris, she founded with her second husband Arthur Cohen, while all of Elaine Lustig Cohen's work can be viewed as experimental it is the work she did for herself and her husband as clients at Ex-Libris that is exceptionally so. Some of her longest running clients included Meridian Books and the Jewish Museum, examples of work from both can be found in this collection along with catalog designs for Ex-Libris. Cohen earned recognition within the graphic design community with awards like the 2011 AIGA Medal.

This is a collection highlighting the career of graphic designer Elaine Lustig Cohen as part of the American Women’s History Initiative.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Mandy Horton
55
 

Eva Zeisel

Eva Zeisel (1906–2011) was born in Budapest and only immigrated to America in 1938 after having been imprisoned by the NKVD in Russia for an alleged plot on Stalin's life. She lived in America for the rest of her life though she continued to work internationally and worked until she passed away in 2011 at 105. Zeisel created designs for American, German, Italian and Japanese companies and her list of clients includes Sears, Roebuck as well as more recent clients such as Crate and Barrel. Zeisel was the recipient of many honors and awards, including an exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in l947 and a Lifetime Achievement award from the Cooper Hewitt in 2005. This collection includes sketches for designs as well as finished ceramic pieces. Note that her most colorful and loudly patterned pieces are designs for German companies.

Includes a video that is roughly 58 minutes long, introductions last about 4:40 then talk begins.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Mandy Horton
56
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Breaking Barriers: Innovation and Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including, objects, photographs, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how technologies developed in the interest of advancing industrialization during the United States’ Second Industrial Revolution made it possible to overcome economic and social barriers, while, in some cases, unintentionally creating new ones. Innovators who developed technologies and tools to make every day living easier and more enjoyable, along with transportation technologies that broke barriers in terms of travel and movement, are also included in this collection. Users are also asked to consider the legacies of these inventions and their significance to innovation and industrialization through to today. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: factory, industry, invention, innovator, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel F. B. Morse, telegraph, Christopher Latham Sholes, typewriter, telephone, communication, technology, workers, labor, International Ladies Garment Workers Union, David Dubinsky, Asa Philip Randolph, John Llewellyn Lewis, Frances Perkins, Samuel Gompers, strike, boycott, union, Transcontinental, railroad, nineteenth century, 19th, twentieth, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
98
 

Breaking Barriers: United Farm Workers

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, objects, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how the United Farm Workers, and leaders Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, and Larry Itliong, organized for worker and civil rights during the 1960s and 70s. Resources address how groups and individuals sought to bring attention to the mistreatment of farmers—particularly Chicano and Filipino workers—the barriers they sought to break, and the reforms they fought to establish through artistic expression, as well as organized boycotts and strikes. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: UFW, Latino, Hispanic, California, Fred Ross, art, grapes, lettuce, farmers, immigration, citizenship, labor, laborers, workers, unions, protest, twentieth century, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
66
 

Breaking Barriers: Reconstruction

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including photographs, primary source documents, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore the efforts of individuals and groups to overcome racial, economic, and political barriers during the era immediately following the Civil War known as Reconstruction. Resources highlight influential individuals and groups, the intentional and unintentional consequences of actions and policies that resulted in the construction of new barriers for some, and competing perspectives over the best path toward reuniting the United States after the Civil War. The second resource in this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: civil rights, slavery, Freedman’s Bureau, U.S. Bureau of Freedmen Refugees and Abandoned Lands, Fisk Jubilee Singers, African American, Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, Sojourner Truth, South Carolina, Congress, House of Representatives, Frederick Douglass, Robert Smalls, Hiram R. Revels, Benjamin S. Turner , Robert C. De Large, Josiah T. Walls, Jefferson F. Long, Joseph H. Rainey, R. Brown Elliot, Thomas Mundy Peterson, Sidney Taliaferro, John Roy Lynch, Octavius Catto, Edmonia Lewis, Laura Smith Haviland, John W. Menard, Harper’s Weekly, Oliver Otis Howard, William T. Sherman, Howard University, W.E.B. Du Bois, nineteenth century, 19th, Washington, D.C., #NHD

EDSITEment
78
 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A facial expression? Explore the different ways people and animals communicate.

amir.tim.sifi
8
 

Design with Empathy (Objects)

This collection includes objects that reflect a design with empathy approach. Explore the objects further on the URLs under the info link.

Jasmine Kassulke
24
 

National History Day: Art and World War I

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including artworks, handwritten memoirs, lesson plans, and articles  - help explore World War I (1914-1918) through artwork created by soldiers and other individuals involved in the Great War.  Collection highlights artists Horace Pippin (a member of the Harlem Hellfighters), Claggett Wilson, William James Aylward, and Harvey Thomas Dunn.  Other important artists and artworks, as well as additional information on World War I, is located at the end. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: wwi; ww1; world war 1; soldier; military; perspective; witness;  african american; artist; artwork; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
75
 

National History Day: The Mexican Revolution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including primary source newspaper articles, recorded symposiums, lesson plans, and artwork - help explore the complexity and impact of the Mexican Revolution (c. 1910-1920). Resources highlight Pancho Villa, US-Mexico relations, and the artistic movements that rose out of the Revolution.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: mexico; new spain; independence; revolutionary; encomienda; francisco pancho villa; emiliano zapata; agrarista; porfirio diaz; madero; woodrow wilson; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD #NHD2018

EDSITEment
31
 

National History Day: Origins of the U.S. Constitution

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including lesson plans, portraits, digital exhibitions, and artwork - help explore how conflict and compromise led to the drafting and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Thirteenth Amendment. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research. 

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: 1700s; 1800s; civil war; james madison; john jay; thomas jefferson; roger sherman; federalists anti-federalists debate; frederick douglass; abraham lincoln; slavery; anti-slavery; constitutional convention 1787; george washington; early democracy; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD; #NHD2018


EDSITEment
32
 

National History Day: Chinese Exclusion Act

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including digital exhibitions, photographs, documents, and lesson plans - help explore the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882), a United States Federal Law restricting immigration of all Chinese laborers and the first law implemented to prevent a specific ethnic group from immigrating to the United States.  Resources highlight the lives of Chinese-American families and racism in American advertisements from the Act's enactment to its repeal in 1943. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait and object resources. The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: prejudice, discrimination; immigration; china; asia; asian; chinese-american; asian-american; 19th century; 1800s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; apa; asian pacific american; nhd; #NHD2018; #NHD; #APA2018

EDSITEment
47
 

National History Day: American Immigrant Experiences

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2019 theme, "Triumph and Tragedy in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes.  

These resources - including objects, documents, websites, and articles - reveal challenges and opportunities experienced by American immigrants in the 19th to mid-20th centuries.  Resources highlight hardships that compelled people to leave their homelands, difficulties immigrants faced upon arrival, and ways they overcame obstacles to build new lives and communities in America.  The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

The history of immigration in America is an immense topic, and this collection addresses only aspects of it.  Use this collection to brainstorm project topics, find connected resources, and as a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment & @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2019. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2019 in the description!

Tags: 1800s, 1900s angel island, ellis island, immigration test, community, prejudice, irish, jewish, syrian, lebanese, arab, italian, mexican, german, greek, bohemian, czech, slovenian, know nothing, triangle shirtwaist factory fire, swedish, chinese exclusion act, japanese american incarceration, internment, bracero program, stories project, #NHD

EDSITEment
128
 

National History Day: The Vietnam War

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day.  While originally created for the 2018 theme, "Conflict and Compromise in History," resources found in this collection are useful for researching other National History Day themes. 

These resources - including protest posters, archival photographs, interviews, artwork, and articles - explore the topic of the Vietnam War from multiple perspectives. Resources highlight politics, the experience of soldiers, anti-war protests, and artwork created in reaction to the Vietnam War. The second tile of this collection contains questions to help with both the analysis of this historical event and the analysis of different types of resources (photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object). The third tile contains a graphic organizer, created by National History Day, to help explore historical context and the "Conflict and Compromise in History" theme.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with EDSITEment, a website for K-12 educators from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tags: ho chi-minh; lyndon b. johnson; richard nixon; walter cronkite; henry kissinger; veteran; oral history; viet cong; protest; peace; 50s; 60s; 70s; 20th century; 1900s; national endowment for the humanities; nhd; #NHD2018 #NHD

EDSITEment
88
 

chairs

sketches, designs, prototypes and finished chairs

Louise Brady
22
 

MUSIC: Dance to the Beat!

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

This collection explores Music. All children, including young children, have musical potential! For more information, check out the National Association for Music Education and their statement on music in early childhood here:  https://nafme.org/about/position-statements/early-childhood-music-education/

This series of four Smithsonian Learning Lab collections is funded as part of the Smithsonian Year of Music. #SmithsonianMusic 

Talk With Me Toolkit
19
 

MUSIC: Create and Improvise

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

This collection explores Music. All children, including young children, have musical potential! For more information, check out the National Association for Music Education and their statement on music in early childhood here:  https://nafme.org/about/position-statements/early-childhood-music-education/.

This series of four Smithsonian Learning Lab collections is funded as part of the Smithsonian Year of Music. #SmithsonianMusic 

Talk With Me Toolkit
21
 

Civil Rights Posters

Christina Ratatori
8
 

Thanksgiving menu

MrsK Shealy
2
 

Artist Trading Cards: Database

In this collection, students will explore  artists from modern and contemporary eras. Students will choose one artist to learn more about using the links provided. Students will research the history in connection with the chosen artist and describe their work. Students will then create 4 trading cards about their chosen artists, with images in the style of the artist. 

Collection includes artwork by the following artists: El Anatsui, Andy Warhol, Dorothea Lange, Monet, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, Nick Cave, Yinka Shonibare, Wayne Thiebaud, Mary Cassat, Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Mies van der Rohe, Kehinde Willey, Amy Sherald, Ansel Adams, Ran Hwang, Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze, Rusell Crotty, Jasper Johns, Romare Bearden, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mondrian, Seurat,  Calder, Donald Judd,  Sol Lewitt, and Roy Lichtenstien.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: art history, trading cards, modern, contemporary,

Rebecca Beaird
135
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