Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(156)
(375)
(467)
(409)
(516)
(12)
(224)
(163)
(87)
(252)
(100)
(131)

Found 531 Collections

 

Behind The Publics Eye's

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

Nathaly Marrero
15
 

The Power of the Ocean

#CIEDigitialStoryTelling.

YEISSON ESCALONA
13
 

Digital Storytelling

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

The Power of Guilt in Sarah Winchester's Motivation to build the Winchester House

KRISTEN LILJA
13
 

Power in High School Students


#CIEDigitialStoryTelling.

#digitalstorytelling

JULIETA LOPEZ
10
 

The Chronicles of Goldie and Ollie

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

#digitalstorytelling 

Valeria Suarez
22
 

Slavery

Stimulus for art work or essay on slavery in America. Students  to create a drawing or painting using images to portray the the pain of slavery. Student can select a variety of media.  The essay could be based upon the first person experience  looking through the eyes of a slave.

Mark Poore
8
 

Access Series: Fantastic Creatures

This topical collection of artworks is based upon "fantastical things." It was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials); and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, utilizing the "See|Think|Wonder" visible thinking routine. You could also pair the collection with popular young adult fantasy novels, and ancient myths and legends.

Descriptors: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Tracie Spinale
64
 

All Access Digital Arts Club: Activities + Plans for Neurodiverse Teens

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens. Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) Club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections. 

All Access Club activities were offered to alumni of the summer workshops, and were held once monthly on Saturdays during the year to build upon skills developed during the workshop, and maintain social connections. During the club, teens practiced social skills through guided activities and Smithsonian museum visits, and produced original digital and hands-on art projects at the Hirshhorn ARTLAB+. Educators led the group in a series of planned educational activities related to the day’s theme—such as “the universe” or “oceans”.  Volunteers assisted club members to use social media, tablets, cameras and laptops to facilitate the digital experience. The activities and resources promoted digital literacy skills, and can motivate families to visit museums to learn, and for teens to build self-esteem. An evaluation session on the final day allowed teens to express their thoughts to the club organizers.

Special thanks to colleague Joshua P. Taylor, Researcher, Virginia Commonwealth University


Keywords: access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, self-determination

Tracie Spinale
19
 

All Access Digital Arts Camp (plans and activities for teens with cognitive and intellectual disabilities)

SCLDA's All Access Digital Arts Program (2012-2016) provided skill-building opportunities in digital arts and communications, creative expression, and social inclusion to a spectrum of teen learners in the Washington, DC metro area. Participating youth visited Smithsonian science, history, and art museums, created digital and physical artworks based upon a tailored curriculum, engaged in social interactions online and in-person, gained digital literacy skills, and developed friendships with other teens.

Through once-per-month club outreach activities and summer intensive camps and workshops, students were exposed to communication, collaborative learning, research, and problem solving. The program served up to 20 youth per session, ages 14 through 22 with cognitive and intellectual disabilities. The youth experienced skill-building, leadership opportunities, and social integration through Smithsonian resources, socialization opportunities, and computer skills. Youth participated in 1.) One- and two-week multi-media digital arts workshops whose outcome was student-produced artworks, songs, and movies that were shared with family and friends at openings and online via a social network; and 2.) club activities--to build upon skills developed during the summer, and maintain social connections.

At the Access Summer Camp workshops, teens learn to tell their own stories through digital arts and media. They focused on a specific story to tell based upon their interests. Content for their artistic self-expressions took the form of printed digital portraits and “sonic self-portrait” digital music compositions, as well as documentary iMovies. Teens toured Smithsonian museums, visited exhibitions and interviewed curators and educators, as well as conducted internet research. Teens ate lunch together and socialized during game breaks. Volunteers worked with teens to provide individual supports and facilitate the experience. Smithsonian educators and neurotypical teen youth mentors guided Access teens to edit their content using photo, sound, and movie editing software.   The movies, portraits, and songs premiered at the Hirshhorn Museum’s ARTLAB+ for family and friends, with teens themselves providing introductory remarks for their artworks. Each teen received a certificate of completion, a digital copy of their artwork, and a framed self-portrait. An evaluation session on the final day of the workshops allowed teens to express their thoughts to the workshop organizers. 

Tracie Spinale
3
 

SSYAC Meeting 3 - Personal Narratives - Stories of Immigration - Why People Move (Archived: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018)

The third meeting of the SSYAC was held in collaboration with the Smithsonian Latino Center. During our pre-meeting activity, we proto-typed the “Latino Headliners and Difficult Conversations” program. We used the creation of comics to explore multiple perspectives of sensitive historical and contemporary issues that pertain to the US Latino experience. Staff from the Smithsonian Latino Center and Smithsonian Exhibits guided us as we explored the multiplicity of immigration realities, and focused on the personal stories that explain why people move

We also discussed the responses to the previous assignment about learning and education experiences in museums with staff from the Smithsonian's Associate Provost for Education and Access office.

KEYWORDS: immigration, migration, forced migration, Latino, maker, making, comic, teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
120
 

SSYAC Meeting 2 - Museums, Activism, and Social Justice (Archived: Fall 2017 - Spring 2018)

When people ask you where you are from, what do you say? Why do you respond that way? Can you remember the first time you witnessed or experienced an injustice? Can we ask a nation to sacrifice development opportunities in the service of protecting the environment / treaty rights / tribal rights? What is your role in carrying on the maintenance of this relationship between tribes and the U.S.? How can museums respond to issues of social justice in the community? What should the Smithsonian do to share this story? How can we involve teens like you in sharing this story?

The second meeting of the SSYAC was held at the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). During our pre-meeting activity, we explored the exhibition Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations. This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection contains the in-gallery activity which looks at the important relationship between the U.S. and tribal Nations by examining the 1851 Horse Creek Treaty and the present-day activism directly related to it at Standing Rock. The collection also contains background information resources about NMAI, as well as the Nation to Nation exhibit.

During our meeting dialogue, we discussed the outcomes of the "One Smithsonian" assignment.


Special thanks to NMAI colleagues Carolyn Rapkievian, Mandy Foster, and Ami Temarantz for creating and implementing the in-gallery activity in the Nation to Nation exhibition at NMAI.


KEYWORDS: student engagement, teen council, American history, DAPL, exhibition tour, inquiry-based learning, questions, Native American

Tracie Spinale
38
 

ORIENTATION | Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) Fall 2018 - Spring 2019


<<This information is relevant to the Fall 2018 - Spring 2019 SSYAC Program.>>

SUPER IMPORTANT: When you click into the tiles, be sure to notice in the upper left hand corner if there is a "paper clip" icon. Clicking on the paperclip icon will lead to more information on a side panel. Some of the tiles will be website links or video links. Tiles marked as PDF or DOC are downloadable information. Within a tile, arrows at the bottom of the screen will navigate you between tiles.


Orientation for new members of the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) for Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

  • About the Smithsonian Secretary's Youth Advisory Council (SSYAC) -- including forms and other important information
  • About Secretary David J. Skorton
  • About Smithsonian's past and present
  • About Smithsonian Affiliate participants
  • About Smithsonian operations, and policy information helpful to SSYAC members. 
  • Meeting Resources (relevant info related to upcoming meetings will be added closer to meeting dates). 

KEYWORDS: teen council, student engagement

Tracie Spinale
32
 

2019 National High School Design Competition

2019 CHALLENGE

Cooper Hewitt is delighted to announce the theme of the 2019 National High School Design Competition: The Nature of Design: What would you design (or redesign) that is a nature-based solution to a global problem?

ABOUT THE COMPETITION

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum launched the National High School Design Competition in collaboration with Target in 2016. Every year, students around the country are challenged to design a solution to a unique scenario, inspired by Cooper Hewitt’s rich collection and stimulating exhibitions.

Visit Cooper Hewitt website to learn more  
WWW.COOPERHEWITT.ORG/DESIGNCOMPETITION


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
19
 

The Presence of Absence: An Exploration of Misrepresentation and Underpresentation

How do contemporary artists grapple with the under- and misrepresentation of certain minorities in portraiture and American history? Participants will explore the newly unveiled portraits of President Barack Obama by Kehinde Wiley and former First Lady Michelle Obama by Amy Sherald and discuss how these artists are looking to the past to paint the present. After close reading these images, participants will consider how artists Ken Gonzales-Day and Titus Kaphar, in the exhibition “UnSeen: Our Past in a New Light,” uncover voices previously unheard. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
19
 

Segregation, Integration, and the Civil Rights Movements in Baseball and the United States Postal Service

Issues of racial inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining the complicated and problematic history of segregation, integration, and the Civil Rights Movement with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. In the classroom, these artifacts, articles, and videos can be used to explore the common and diverging ways that segregation manifested itself in Major League Baseball and the Postal Service. Students will also be able to explore how individuals in both institutions combatted this segregation through movements for integration and, beyond that, a broader expansion of opportunity for African-American individuals in these institutions. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze the thematic significance of artistic depictions of African-American and white ballplayers and, more specifically, what these depictions communicated about these two racial groups and their place in the sport of baseball. Supporting questions and further ideas for classroom application can be found in the "Notes to Other Users" section.



National Postal Museum
31
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
21
 

Santa Claus: Comparing Evolving Imagery and Text

This collection gathers depictions of Santa Claus from ads, paintings, photographs, stamps from 1837 to today. Also, includes analyses of his evolving image from the Smithsonian Magazine and the National Museum of American History blog. How does the description of Santa in the Christmas poem, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" compare with the images that follow? Includes a discussion question extension: How might you revamp Christmas stories to better reflect the time and country that you live in?

Keywords: Saint Nicholas, holidays, poetry

Kim Fenton
37
 

Holiday Celebrations: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Why Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol". Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Ryan Maxey
29
 

Women in Baseball and the Post Office

Issues of gender inequality have had profound effects on all aspects of American society and its many institutions. In conjunction with the National Postal Museum’s upcoming exhibition Baseball: America’s Home Run, this collection will assist teachers in examining this issue with their students through two important institutions of the 20th Century: Major League Baseball and the United States Postal Service. The collection explores this essential question: How was the changing status of women in American society during the late 19th and early 20th centuries represented in professional baseball and the United States Postal Service? In small groups, students will discuss this underlying question through the variety of resources in this collection, examining the historical access women have had to these institutions, their divergent experiences compared to their male counterparts, and how women have historically been depicted on USPS stamps. Some supporting questions to scaffold inquiry can be found in the “Notes to Other Users” section.

National Postal Museum
31
 

Pottery: Pots & Jars #latinoHAC

This collection focuses on pottery from various cultures. Students can use the Art Elements and the Principles of Design to critique these works of art. 

Nadia Earl
30
 

Museum

This is my digital story of my experience visiting the American History Museum in Washington D.C. 

#smithstories

Stephanie Palencia
0
 

Santa Claus: Comparing Evolving Imagery and Text

This collection gathers depictions of Santa Claus from ads, paintings, photographs, stamps from 1837 to today. Also, includes analyses of his evolving image from the Smithsonian Magazine and the National Museum of American History blog. How does the description of Santa in the Christmas poem, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" compare with the images that follow? Includes a discussion question extension: How might you revamp Christmas stories to better reflect the time and country that you live in?

Keywords: Saint Nicholas, holidays, poetry

Ashley Naranjo
37
 

Artifact Analysis

In this collection we explore the definition of an artifact and analyze various artifacts from multiple cultural periods.

Idaho State Museum
18
 

4 Forces of Flight

Photos and Articles that are supplemental learning to the forces of flight. All artifacts are interactive for student engagement and assessment.

Dalton Alatan
10
49-72 of 531 Collections