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Found 856 Collections

 

Welcome to Mars

A collection of videos, articles and artifacts related to the chemistry of the Red Planet.

#MCteach

Virginia Miller
21
 

Weathering, Erosion, and Deposition

This collection explores the processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition and how they appear on Earth and Mars.

Students will:

  • Understand the processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition and how it creates soil.
  • Apply what they know about weathering, erosion, and deposition on Earth and apply it to landforms on Mar and draw conclusions about its past and present.
  • Present an argument for why Mars had liquid water in large quantities in its past. 

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, Earth Science 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
23
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Michele Hubert
10
 

Weather

Students will categorize the sources by the corresponding weather.

Amanda Dashler
17
 

Watersheds, Water Clarity & Human Impact on Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe has become a symbol of the controversial balance between preserving and expanding into natural systems. Tahoe’s clarity has also been decreasing since at least 1968; down from 100 feet of visibility to about 70 feet nowadays. Fine particles from urban expansion is one of the main causes, as well as the introduction of invasive species. These photos and questions will help students to understand some of the reasons why Tahoe is becoming murkier. They can provoke relevant ideas about how to slow that loss of clarity down or even reverse it, so that future generations of people and native species can enjoy and rely on this magnificent lake, just as we have done in the past. Simply click the paperclip in each image to see the prompts pertaining to each photo. This collection is ideal for a discussion-based lesson.

Lake Tahoe Interpretation
19
 

Watch Night

This collection asks students to examine an image entitled "Waiting for the Hour" and to try to determine its meaning and purpose. Students will practice interpretation with justification and then learn more about the history of "watch night services" and the importance of the 1862 watch night in United States history. They will also consider the legacy of this image--a copy is currently hanging in the White House.

tags: emancipation, freedom, Civil War, Abraham Lincoln, proclamation

Kate Harris
4
 

Waste Not, Want Not

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring reducing, reusing, and recycling. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about upcycling and fix it clinics as well as learn about how people can repurpose waste. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
38
 

Volcanoes

Explore volcanic eruptions and their effect on rock formations through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: plate tectonics, seismic activity, geologist


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Voices and Votes - Faces of Change in American Democracy

Description: 

This learning lab introduces students to individuals who have shaped and participated in American democracy over time. Using a variety of resources, take in the stories and impact of Thomas Jefferson, Molly Pitcher, Thomas Paine, Richard Allen, William Apess, Wong Chin Foo, Alice Paul, Ella Baker, and Dolores Huerta.

Voices and Votes: Democracy in America is an exhibition from Museum on Main Street traveling to rural American from 2020-2025. Voices and Votes is based on the exhibition American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith at the National Museum of American History. This learning lab can be used in conjunction with the exhibition or as a stand alone resource on the history of democracy.

Visit Smithsonian History Explorer to learn more!  

#historicalthinking

Guiding Questions:

Who has influenced American democracy? Why did they participate in American democracy and what did they achieve? Have these people changed over time?

How have social movements changed American democracy throughout history?

How can individuals or groups take action to participate in American democracy?

What issues at a local, state, or national level affect your life? Can your participation in American democracy resolve those issues?

Who is participating in and influencing national, state, or local conversations about  American democracy today? Who would you add to this list?

SITES Museum on Main Street
49
 

Visualizing Guns Violence

At Rutgers University-Newark and within the Graphic Design Program, we offer two courses that focus on community-based (the Design Consortium) and research-oriented (Visual Means) activities. These classes are part of a larger initiative, and art incubator called Express Newark, where community and the university interact, collaborate and co-create.

In addition to the DC and VM courses, we offer an advanced design studio course that focuses on unique design applications through the use of the letterpress printing process, also located at Express Newark. This coming spring, I will be teaching the letterpress course, and in the following fall, I will teach the Visual Means course. Within both classes, I will be looking to develop different ways of visualizing gun violence.

Gun violence is one of the most critical and complex issues we currently face in the United States. Rutgers University has recently created the New Jersey’s Center on Gun Violence. The center’s mission looks to “conduct interdisciplinary research on the causes, consequences, and solutions to gun-related violence while respecting the rights of legal, safe gun ownership and use.” Within the Visual Means course, I plan to work with researchers from this center on developing ways of visualizing the complicated and overwhelming data disconnect between research and public understanding of gun rights, safety, and violence.

What I plan to do with this Learning Lab is to use it as a repository of images, concepts, facts, texts, and web-based information. In the coming months, I will develop a pedagogical approach that weaves together methods of research, visualization, and implementation into various applications of visual communication and graphic form. The Learning Lab will grow as our knowledge about this subject increases and while documenting our process of research, visualization, and implementation.

Research
Step 1 - Learning Lab
We will use the Learning Lab as a repository for our impressions and image collections that show the different ways in which guns have been woven into the mythology of America and seen in our collective culture. Using different lenses such as art, film, photography, sculpture, advertising, satirical cartoons, comics, pop culture, propaganda, and protest, my students and I will attempt to take apart and reconstruct our understanding of the many issues surrounding this divisive topic. 

Visualization and typographic experimentation
Step 2 - Weather Report
Dan Friedman, American, 1945–1995
While teaching at Yale University, Dan Friedman developed a teaching method that is still used in many schools today—the Weather Report. Through a series of detailed parameters, students will be asked to create different permutations that experiment with various interpretations and hierarchies. As students advance through this assignment, the limitations are slowly lifted, and students begin to generate solutions that are more and more expressive, dynamic, and experimental. Using this method, students will experiment with various hierarchies and typographic solutions—setting the stage for the letterpress printing process. 

Implementation 
Step 3 - Letterpress process 
Working with content generated from our research, relevant information, thought-provoking content, quotes, or statistics, students will explore various methods of experimenting with typographic structure and syntax. Using the Learning Lab, students will be exposed to the dynamic work of the Futurists, Constructivists, the Bauhaus, late Modernists, and the explosive typography of the New Wave designers.

Designers would include:

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Italian, 1876–1944

The Futurists were known (amongst other things) for the emotive and expressive typography.

El Lissitzky, Russian, 1890–1941
Russian Constructivism who experimented with developing a universal language based on simple shapes and reductive color.

Ladislav Sutnar, Czechoslovakian, 1897–1976
Sutnar’s visual communication often explains complex information and concepts unambiguously and with a spartan efficiency. The Constructivist brought great structure and organization to their typographic messages through minimal means in an attempt to generate a universal visual vocabulary.

Herbert Bayer, Austrian, 1900–1985
Jan Tschichold, German, 1902–1974
Max Bill, German, 1908–1994
At the Bauhaus and through its influences, designers brought together various conceptual approaches to the organization and implementation of articulate typographic applications.

Alvin Lustig, American, 1915–1955
American designer Alvin Lustig (along with Paul Rand, Bradbury Thompson, Lester Beall, Ladislav Sutnar, and others) was instrumental in developing a mature, Modern approach inspired by Europe to American graphic design and typography.

Wolfgang Weingart, German, 1941–
Teaches at the Basel School of Design and separating himself from some of Late Modernist’s more restrictive characteristics while redefining for himself an expressive typographic approach through experimentation and practice.

April Greiman, American, 1948–
Inspired by Armin Hofmann and Wolfgang Weingart and her experiences in Europe at the Basel School of Design, Greiman brought a fresh and unique perspective to graphic design within the United States.

Bruce Licher, American, 1958–
American typographer and letterpress designer that works within the traditions of letterpress printing while pushing the edges of typography, unique form, and graphic design applications.


Professor Ned Drew
Graphic Design Faculty
Rutgers University-Newark

Founding Director of The Design Consortium & XPress | Center for Typography initiatives at Express Newark

Co-Founder
BRED | a collaborative design lab
www.brednation.com
Instagram: bred_letterpress



 

 

Ned Drew
137
 

Visual Cues to Role and Rank in World Art

Throughout world history artists have used visual cues to communicate role and rank. As a cultural window, art shares insights in to the structure and beliefs of a society. Through compare and contrast questions students analyze the selected works to better understand artistic techniques as well as the cultural mores communicated through each work. This activity was developed at Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections Summer institute for Educators held at the Freer/Sackler, summer 2018.

Kristen Morrison
13
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Rose Krieg
6
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
6
 

Virginia History Tour

From Jamestown to the present, explore some of the people, places and events that tell the story of the history of Virginia. 

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Nancy Butler
56
 

Virginia History Told Through Stamps

Significant persons and events from Virginia History are told through U.S. Stamps.  Discover the history of the Old Dominion.

Nancy Butler
24
 

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

How do we  strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. 

For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

This collection contains several sub-collections that explore different topics related to this event.  Learn more at https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

#ViralHistories

National Museum of American History
7
 

Viral Histories: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency?

Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities

https://s.si.edu/ViralHistories

We must all learn to navigate uncertainty in these increasingly complex times. We can begin to do this by understanding that we are part of a larger community, recognize that the pandemic has led to xenophobia towards and endangerment of vulnerable communities, and accepting that we can make choices every day to help combat hate. 

Throughout the Viral Histories event we have asked viewers to reflect on the question: How do we choose to strengthen a community in the middle of an emergency? This collection includes exemplars of individuals and organizations, today and in the past, who have answered this question in different ways. 

We encourage you to explore these resources from the National Museum of American History and partners as you think about your answer to the question: How will I choose to strengthen and build community in the middle of an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

#NMAH

National Museum of American History
19
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Views on foreigners during the Edo Period - Intro Lesson

This lesson serves as an introduction to the Edo Period in Japan. The module is centered around the artwork "Southern Barbarians," a folding screen painting depicting the arrival of Portuguese traders to a Japanese port, a common scene previous to the Sakoku (closed country) period. After a close analysis of the folding screen, students contrast the scene depicted in the artwork with the proscriptions of the Sakoku edict of 1635 and the Portuguese exclusion edict of 1639. The stark contrast between these two trade scenarios will help students understand the nuance of the political and economic situation of Edo Japan. Additionally, transitioning from a scene where international trade is robust and ordinary, to the drafting of these two edicts severely curtailing this very trade, will lead students to inquire into the extent, as well as the limitations of the closed country period. 


Lesson plan (1 - 2 hours) 

1. "Southern Barbarians" illustrates and extends understanding of the ‘Nanbanjin’ as well as Nanban trade previous to Edo Japan. 'Nanbanjin' referred to Southern European, usually Spanish and Portuguese. The teacher will explain the main traits of Nanban art in order to elucidate further details of the artwork other than the ones that the students observe during the routine. 

For further reference on Nanban Art, read pages 71-142 of the book referenced here. The text contains multiple other examples of folding screens from the period.

See: 

Weston, Victoria. Portugal, Jesuits and Japan: Spiritual Beliefs and Earthly Goods. Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2013. Print.

Link to online copy: https://archive.org/details/portugaljesuitsj00west 

2. Class completes a 'See, Think, Wonder' routine with the resource "Southern Barbarians in Japan." The artwork is full of details (such as the man carrying fabric from another Asian port because the Portuguese served as relay traders in the region). This routine might take 30 minutes or more to complete for this reason. 

As part of a World History class, the teacher could highlight these historic "easter eggs" in the artwork and tie in other topics from class such as cotton and silk trade, slavery, navigation technology, missionaries in the East or the Portuguese empire and extension among other subjects present in the folding screen.  

While at first, the Project Zero routines will help to understand the period, the actors and the reasons for drafting the two edicts, the teacher should also emphasize at the end of the routine why this type of art existed and how Japanese viewed Nanban trade. The purpose is to begin the discussion of Edo Japan with an understanding of the complex world of foreign relations, cultural forces and international commerce at the time.  

3. Following this analysis, students perform a close reading and discussion of the edicts of 1635 and 1639. The Project Zero routine 'Explanation Game' should help guide the reading of the edicts. Students first read the edicts on their own, clarify obtuse language, and highlight a few proscriptions that they believe define the Sakoku period. Following this, students complete the 'Explanation Game' routine in small groups. 

4. At the end of this introductory lesson, the teacher leads a group discussion on the edicts, establishing the main proscriptions and political reasons to ban the Portuguese traders. Teacher should clarify the political and social situation of Japan at the time, the presence of the Spanish and Portuguese traders in neighboring countries and the expansion of their respective empires. If class will continue exploring the nuances of the Edo Period, then the teacher could also briefly explain the difference in operations between the Dutch traders and the Portuguese traders. 


Additional resources

Mini-lesson plan (30 minutes)

The remaining resources in this collection allow to further explore the other foreigners in Edo Japan in order to nuance the discussion of international trade and foreign relations during the period. Smaller groups of 3-5 students can analyze separately various ukiyo-e of foreigners, while completing a 'Question Starts' visible thinking routine and discussing their findings at the end of class period with their classmates. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
 

Vietnam War for novel The Things They Carried

This collection has images of the Vietnam War to background the novel The Things They Carried.     This collection should help to answer the compelling question; was the Vietnam War justified?

#TeachingInquiry

June Bohr
5
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