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Found 6,073 Collections

 

Visualizing Guns Violence

At Rutgers University-Newark and within the Graphic Design Program, we offer two courses that focus on community-based (the Design Consortium) and research-oriented (Visual Means) activities. These classes are part of a larger initiative, and art incubator called Express Newark, where community and the university interact, collaborate and co-create.

In addition to the DC and VM courses, we offer an advanced design studio course that focuses on unique design applications through the use of the letterpress printing process, also located at Express Newark. This coming spring, I will be teaching the letterpress course, and in the following fall, I will teach the Visual Means course. Within both classes, I will be looking to develop different ways of visualizing gun violence.

Gun violence is one of the most critical and complex issues we currently face in the United States. Rutgers University has recently created the New Jersey’s Center on Gun Violence. The center’s mission looks to “conduct interdisciplinary research on the causes, consequences, and solutions to gun-related violence while respecting the rights of legal, safe gun ownership and use.” Within the Visual Means course, I plan to work with researchers from this center on developing ways of visualizing the complicated and overwhelming data disconnect between research and public understanding of gun rights, safety, and violence.

What I plan to do with this Learning Lab is to use it as a repository of images, concepts, facts, texts, and web-based information. In the coming months, I will develop a pedagogical approach that weaves together methods of research, visualization, and implementation into various applications of visual communication and graphic form. The Learning Lab will grow as our knowledge about this subject increases and while documenting our process of research, visualization, and implementation.

Research
Step 1 - Learning Lab
We will use the Learning Lab as a repository for our impressions and image collections that show the different ways in which guns have been woven into the mythology of America and seen in our collective culture. Using different lenses such as art, film, photography, sculpture, advertising, satirical cartoons, comics, pop culture, propaganda, and protest, my students and I will attempt to take apart and reconstruct our understanding of the many issues surrounding this divisive topic. 

Visualization and typographic experimentation
Step 2 - Weather Report
Dan Friedman, American, 1945–1995
While teaching at Yale University, Dan Friedman developed a teaching method that is still used in many schools today—the Weather Report. Through a series of detailed parameters, students will be asked to create different permutations that experiment with various interpretations and hierarchies. As students advance through this assignment, the limitations are slowly lifted, and students begin to generate solutions that are more and more expressive, dynamic, and experimental. Using this method, students will experiment with various hierarchies and typographic solutions—setting the stage for the letterpress printing process. 

Implementation 
Step 3 - Letterpress process 
Working with content generated from our research, relevant information, thought-provoking content, quotes, or statistics, students will explore various methods of experimenting with typographic structure and syntax. Using the Learning Lab, students will be exposed to the dynamic work of the Futurists, Constructivists, the Bauhaus, late Modernists, and the explosive typography of the New Wave designers.

Designers would include:

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Italian, 1876–1944

The Futurists were known (amongst other things) for the emotive and expressive typography.

El Lissitzky, Russian, 1890–1941
Russian Constructivism who experimented with developing a universal language based on simple shapes and reductive color.

Ladislav Sutnar, Czechoslovakian, 1897–1976
Sutnar’s visual communication often explains complex information and concepts unambiguously and with a spartan efficiency. The Constructivist brought great structure and organization to their typographic messages through minimal means in an attempt to generate a universal visual vocabulary.

Herbert Bayer, Austrian, 1900–1985
Jan Tschichold, German, 1902–1974
Max Bill, German, 1908–1994
At the Bauhaus and through its influences, designers brought together various conceptual approaches to the organization and implementation of articulate typographic applications.

Alvin Lustig, American, 1915–1955
American designer Alvin Lustig (along with Paul Rand, Bradbury Thompson, Lester Beall, Ladislav Sutnar, and others) was instrumental in developing a mature, Modern approach inspired by Europe to American graphic design and typography.

Wolfgang Weingart, German, 1941–
Teaches at the Basel School of Design and separating himself from some of Late Modernist’s more restrictive characteristics while redefining for himself an expressive typographic approach through experimentation and practice.

April Greiman, American, 1948–
Inspired by Armin Hofmann and Wolfgang Weingart and her experiences in Europe at the Basel School of Design, Greiman brought a fresh and unique perspective to graphic design within the United States.

Bruce Licher, American, 1958–
American typographer and letterpress designer that works within the traditions of letterpress printing while pushing the edges of typography, unique form, and graphic design applications.


Professor Ned Drew
Graphic Design Faculty
Rutgers University-Newark

Founding Director of The Design Consortium & XPress | Center for Typography initiatives at Express Newark

Co-Founder
BRED | a collaborative design lab
www.brednation.com
Instagram: bred_letterpress



 

 

Ned Drew
137
 

Volcanoes

Explore volcanic eruptions and their effect on rock formations through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: plate tectonics, seismic activity, geologist


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Forensic Anthropology: What Bones Reveal

Explore what human bones reveal about the past through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.


Keywords: anthropology, archeology, archaeology, carbon dating, chemistry, data, heredity, evolution, carbon 14

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
46
 

Bees

Explore bees' behavior and their role in pollination through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: animal, insect, plant adaptation, animal communication, flowers, pollen, honey, hive, engineering, entomologist, pollinator, colony, system


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
61
 

East Asian Numismatics in 3D!

The Smithsonian's National Numismatic Collection (NNC) is America's collection of monetary and transactional objects. This diverse and expansive global collection contains objects that represent every inhabited continent and span more than 3,000 years of human history. The NNC holds an expansive collection of East Asian coins with notable objects from China, Korea, and Japan. Indeed, many of the earliest donations to the Smithsonian in the 19th century were East Asian coins and paper currencies. They include a set of coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant by the Japanese Meiji Emperor during Grant’s world tour. Grant’s widow, Julia Dent Grant, donated the unique gift to the museum in 1886. Shortly after, the estate of collector George Bunker Glover bequeathed more than 2,025 pieces of East Asian currency to the Smithsonian. Growth of the NNC’s East Asian collection continued in the 20th century with significant donations from The Chase Manhattan Money Museum,  the descendants of collector Alexander I. Pogrebetsky, and the estate of collector Josiah K. Lilly Jr. Today the NNC continues to grow its East Asian holdings. In 2017 the NNC received 473 objects from the Howard F. Bowker Collection. Thanks to the generous support of the Howard F. Bowker Family, Michael Chou, and the Smithsonian’s 3D Program, the NNC’s East Asian holdings are accessible online, with a selection available in 3D!


Emily Pearce Seigerman
10
 

Coral Reefs and Climate Change

Explore coral reefs and climate change through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

NHD 2020: Breaking Barriers with American Art

This collection is designed to support teachers and students exploring the 2020 National History Day theme: Breaking Barriers in History. Included in this collection are five prospective topics aligned with the NHD theme, for each of which we have supplied American artworks that could be used as primary source texts and/or inspiration for further research.

How did the invention of photography break down the barrier between ordinary Americans and the battlefield during the Civil War? 

What barriers, both geographic and social, did the invention and expansion of the subway break for New Yorkers? 

How did James Van Der Zee's Harlem photography studio help a rising middle class African American community break barriers?

How have American Indians overcome barriers to tribal sovereignty, and what barriers still exist?

How did abstract painter Alma Thomas break gender and racial barriers in the art world?

#NHD2020 #NHD #BecauseOfHerStory

Phoebe Hillemann
55
 

Slavery in the Archives

Earl Brooks
21
 

Intangible Heritage through Material Culture: The Journey of an Ecuadorian Boat Seat

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by exploring an Ecuadorian boat seat, the first object donated to the National Museum of African History and Culture, and how this tangible object represents the survival and transmission of intangible cultural heritage in the African diaspora. The seat belonged to Débora Nazareno, a descendant of enslaved Africans in Ecuador, and is engraved with Anansi, a popular spider figure in West African folklore. The boat seat was gifted to the museum by her grandson, Juan Garcia Salazar, a renowned Esmeraldan historian. 

Included here are the objects itself, a bilingual video with curator Ariana Curtis, two suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "Unveiling Stories" - from Harvard's Project Zero Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the museum display, Maroon communities, Anansi, the oral tradition.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC 

Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Adding the A to STEM: Integrating Portraiture into STEAM/STEM Subjects

This Learning Lab demonstrates how portraiture can be used as an interdisciplinary springboard for lessons in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Portraits of STEM pertinent sitters provide a jumping-in point for students, visually grounding them in a subject. In this way, portraiture functions as an interdisciplinary tool to engage students and enrich their learning across curriculum. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
308
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Bracero": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Trude Guermonprez: Breaking Boundaries with Design

Trude Guermonprez (1910-1979) was a highly regarded textile designer born in Germany. Guermonperz immigrated to America and began teaching weaving at the Black Mountain College in North Carolina until the weaving program there ended. Trude Guermonperz then went on to teach at the California School of Fine Arts (now the San Francisco Art Institute), and finally at California College of Arts and Crafts (now known as the California College of Art & Design) where she became chair of the department. Through her teaching Guermonperz had an enormous impact on American weavers, many cite her as an influence and inspiration. Trude Guermonprez's work includes designs that were completed for clients and industry as well as broad collection of highly experimental pieces. This collection includes examples of functional designs for clients, experimental designs and samples, as well as a selection of her beautifully rendered sketches for designs.

This collection focuses on the objects within the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum collection from Trude Guermonprez, yet also includes photographs of the designer from the Archives of American Art.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
50
 

Dorothy Wright Liebes: Unorthodox Textiles

Dorothy Wright Liebes (1893-1972) was a textile designer who is known for having developed a distinctive look, including vibrant colors and patterns that became synonymous with the Modernist movement in California in the 1940s and 1950s. Widely traveled, Liebes often drew inspiration from the places she visited around the world for her unique textile designs. Her designs often include bold colors associated with California Modernism. Liebes experimented with materials, aside from traditional materials such as silk and cotton, she was also know to incorporate cellophane and plastics as well as metals and metallic yarns into her designs. Fiercely determined and career driven, when her husband Leon Liebes suggested she quit working she divorced him, choosing herself and her career over the marriage. Her designs were so successful and sought after that they inspired many imitations.

Contributions of Liebes can be found in the Archives of American Art, the National Portrait Gallery as well as the Copper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, this collection included examples across the Smithsonian but primarily focuses on content from the Cooper Hewitt.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
71
 

Gere Kavanaugh: A Colorful Life

Gere Kavanaugh (1929- ) has had a long a storied career as a designer, she was one of the first women to graduate from the Cranbrook Academy, as well as one of the first female designers employed at GM, dubbed the Damsels of Design. An all around designer her work was not limited to one field. Her designs include furniture and industrial designs as well as interior, graphic and exhibition design. After leaving GM Kavanaugh went to work for Victor Gruen in Los Angeles eventually leaving in 1964 to start her own design firm, Gere Kavanaugh/Designs were she continued to work for with and for big name clients. Her designs for fabrics and wallpaper are great examples of her playful and colorful approaches to design. Now in her 90s her work continues to be relevant with today's audiences, her designs have most recently been sold to CB2.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
40
 

Willi Smith

Willi Smith (1958-1987)

Willi Smith was an African American fashion designer whose street wear line known as WilliWear was and experiment of democracy in fashion. WilliWear designs were known to be bold, blurring the lines between high and low culture, and his work often involved collaborations with other artists and designers. The openly gay designer's career was cut short when he died in 1987 from complications from HIV/AIDS.

This collection is a representation of the 2020 exhibition Willi Smith: Street Couture at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, which features over 200 pieces from Smith’s work and career and his numerous collaborations with artists, dancers, choreographers, graphic designers, architects, and more. The works on view include video, sketches, patterns, photographs, and garments.

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
67
 

Power Posters by designExplorr

Learn about the power of designing posters that communicate meaningful messages using Adobe Spark. Adobe Spark is the easiest and quickest way to create visually stunning graphics. In this workshop students will develop meaningful messages, discover the three things that make posters powerful, and determine what makes a poster work. This presentation also includes guiding questions to help direct the students learning such as, "What is the posters message?," "What kind of imagery is used?," "Who is the poster for?," and "What makes the poster work?" Materials used in this workshop are a pictures of historic powerful poster, a discovery worksheet, and two supporting videos. This workshop is for youth (ages 12-16).

designExplorr
19
 

Carnival Arts

Traditional carnival sounds, video, and objects as well as other items to inspire new carnivals.
Celeste Landeros
15
 

Art to understand place

Montana 

Jeannette Wandler
4
 

Drawing for Design

Drawing is a powerful tool that designers use to explore, represent and develop their design ideas into concepts. When we represent ideas throughout the design process, we use visualisation tools and techniques such as schematic sketching, thumbnail sketching, ideation sketching and illustration sketching.

 In this learning lab you will explore a variety of drawing visualisation techniques that you can use in your design process. 

Learning Goals:

  • Understand the purpose of drawing in the design process
  • Explore design drawings of products, services and environments
  • Analyse different drawing styles, how they are applicable to different design disciplines and stages of the design process
  • Decide how to differentiate between critical and non-critical elements when representing ideas.
Jasmine Kassulke
73
 

Technological Evolution

Our rapidly developing world has lead to unprecedented evolutions in technology. Technology tells a continuous narrative of innovation, disruption, collaboration, risk and resilience. Through this collection students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative? How do you define innovation?

To help unpack these questions have students explore each object by answering:

  • Who is this object made for?
  • How is it used?
  • What did this object allow people to do?
  • What connections do you notice between the objects?
  • Was this technology innovative for its time? Why/Why not?  

This collection was inspired by the Bob Greenberg Selects exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum: https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/exhibitions/1108968917/page1

Jasmine Kassulke
36
 

Lactase Persistence and Human Migration

How can genetics help us to understand human migration? In this collection, students will use maps, articles, and videos to analyze genetics research about lactase persistence before building their own maps to understand the co-evolution of genes and culture. 

This collection can be used in a Biology classroom with units on enzymes, genetics and/or human evolution, in an interdisciplinary unit to link Math with Biology (students to use ratios, statistics, and data to build a map) or in a Geography course.

Students should be either given a color copy of the lactase persistence map or it could be projected. Once students have been given the time and opportunity to look at the map, the following questions should be asked.

  1. What do you notice about this map?
  2. What questions do you have about this map?
  3. What can this map show us about human migration?

Next, ask students to work in groups, each choose one of the following three articles to read, then share a brief summary of their article with those in their group. These articles are excellent resources that provide different perspectives on lactase persistence and evolution. The first article (the source of the lactase persistence map) provides a clear explanation of what we can learn from milk fats found on ancient pottery shards and the link between lactase persistence and migration. The second article focuses on animal domestication and the third on the nutritional benefits of being able to digest lactase as a selective advantage.

The third article also connects lactase persistence, the shift to agricultural communities, and human migration with the genetics of human skin color. This could provide an opportunity for students to discuss the inheritance of skin color and perhaps skin color and race. A separate collection has been made to help discuss this and can be found here.

In the activity section, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute BioInteractive (HHMI) video summarizes some key aspects about the genetics of lactase persistence as well as some of the history. If students have already read and shared out to show understanding, the video could be used to meet the needs of students who tend to be more auditory learners. The activity “Patterns in the Distribution of Lactase Persistence,” also from HHMI, guides students though an understanding of the co-evolution of genes and culture. “Students analyze data obtained from published lactase-persistence studies involving many populations sampled around the world. The activity involves calculating percentages, drawing pie charts, plotting the pie charts on a world map, and analyzing the data. This lesson provides an interdisciplinary approach to studying lactase persistence, connecting biological concepts and data analysis to world geography and culture”. (https://www.biointeractive.org/sites/default/files/Patterns-in-the-Distribution-of-Lactase-Persistence-Educator.pdf)

The map the students create can be compared to the initial image provided (a map of lactase persistence) as well as the information provided by the Smithsonian Magazine articles to predict the path of human migration. Based on the initial map, reading and activity, students can show their understanding of the connection between genetics and human migration by using the Project Zero thinking routine ‘Claim, Support, Question’. Claims can be made based on their new knowledge and then supported with evidence from the map, reading or activity. Then, students can pose questions for further research or discussion.

In the additional resource section, a YouTube clip has been provided to further extend the conversation. Sarah Tishkoff, from the earlier HHMI video, does an excellent job explaining the co-evolution of culture and the gene for lactase persistence.

Emily Veres
10
 

Water Around Us

Take a moment and look at each piece of work. What is each body of water purpose or is their a purpose. After pick two pieces to compare. Create a journal entry using I see, I think, I wonder of the two pieces. After write the reasoning behind each piece you chose. 


Riley Golder
11
 

Entrepreneurship Inspiration & Design

A collection to give students an undertanding of the relationship between entrepreneurship and innovation over time.  The key component is applying the design thinking process to their current thought process.  The wallet challenge begins this unit in having students design a prototype while using the design thinking process.  Next they will analyze how prototypes have advanced due to technology and innovation.  The purpose is to link the importance of applying a thorough thought process when designing and inventing.

Taryn Grigas
25
673-696 of 6,073 Collections