Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(327)
(617)
(823)
(751)
(917)
(28)
(423)
(352)
(189)
(430)
(162)
(172)

Found 944 Collections

 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "New Age of Slavery" by Patrick Campbell (2014), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the contemporary landscape including the pattern of police brutality against African Americans and the Black Lives Matter Movement while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

Keywords: NMAAHC, African American, slavery, flag, American, 13th Amendment, visual art, Black Lives Matter, lynching, United States, visual literacy

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

"Legendary Women's Voices" - Cynthia Erivo & NSO at the Kennedy Center, April 2019

On April 5-6, 2019, the Kennedy Center will host an evening of "Legendary Women's Voices," as performed by Cynthia Erivo and the National Symphony Orchestra. Featuring repertoire by artists ranging from Marian Anderson and Nina Simone to Gladys Knight and Beyoncé, the performances aim to honor a diversity of iconic women musicians. The event is being co-promoted by the Smithsonian Year of Music. Through the Learning Lab, the Smithsonian highlights a collection of artifacts that relate to the musicians featured in the Kennedy Center concerts.

#SmithsonianMusic

Meredith Holmgren
36
 

Migrations in American History: The Making of "Many Voices, One Nation"

This collection serves as a preview for the fourth of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”

National Museum of American History colleagues Steve Velasquez and Lauren Safranek will discuss the making of the exhibition, "Many Voices, One Nation," and its accompanying educational website, "Becoming US." Together the exhibition and educational website aim to explore not only how the many voices of people in America have shaped our nation, but also to guide high school teachers and students in learning immigration and migration history in a more accurate and inclusive way.

Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach
Philippa Rappoport
7
 

1920's Artifacts

To get artifacts that demonstrate the themes and purposes of the 1920s.
Nav Id
10
 

1920s Artifacts

These artifacts really slapdizzled the 1920s.

Caleb armstrong
10
 

The Roman Empire

As I am writing this I am sitting in a cafe shop in a small town on an island Sardinia in Italy. To this day, the remains of the Roman Empire and it's architecture can be found all over the island, which sparked an interest in me for that great culture and it makes me want to focus this project on that. This project focuses on the architecture of the great Roman empire and the influence that the architecture of the Roman Empire, changes in the way this Culture express itself trough architecture and art work within that architecture. When traveling to a new place, I believe the first thing people notice is the architecture and then they look within. This is exactly what this project will try to do.   

This collection will focus on art throughout of history or Roman Empire and Italy as we know it today. It will start from the Ancient Greece where early Roman Empire drew most of it’s inspiration for art  and architecture and connect various different forms of art and how it interacted with the history of this great nation. I hope you enjoy the collection. 

 #AHMC2019

Ivan Abramovic
18
 

Exploring the Cultural Markers of Identity

This collection serves as a preview for the third of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”


The National Museum of African American History and Culture tells American History through an African American lens. Kinshasha Holman Conwill, Elaine Nichols, and Ariana Curtis will engage participants in an exploration of the cultural collections of the museum as markers of identity. A fuller description and presenter bios are included inside the collection.


Resources included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore before the seminar itself.


#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
12
 

Art Conservation Workshop @ SAAM

For Teachers of 6th-12th Grade 

Saturday, March 9 (9:30-1:30) 

Location: Smithsonian American Art Museum (8th and G Streets, NW)


What can you learn when you put art, science, and history together in a room? Come find out why these three disciplines form the foundation of art conservation and how this profession can encourage students to see history as ongoing, science as creative, and art as a Rubik’s Cube of choices. Learn what it takes to preserve a collection with our Lunder Conservation Center’s Program Coordinator, Laura Hoffman!

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
12
 

Beauty in the Ancient World

This collection has been made to depict the ideals of beauty that were birthed in the Ancient World. The differing time periods illustrate similar and different beauty ideals that are still present today. Body types, makeup, fashion, etc will be showcased to demonstrate how the influence of the culture and time defined beauty. #AHMC2019

Women in Egyptian art are often depicted with slim, high waists, and narrow hips. Dark black hair, possibly even with a bluish tinge, and golden or “bright” skin for women were considered ideal.Women also wore long, braided wigs. Men and women in Egypt routinely shaved their hair and wore wigs instead.Men and women also both wore makeup, namely heavy black eyeliner that doubled as protection from the sun.

While many women today would pluck a thick “unibrow,” women in Ancient Greece liked the look, and many used dark pigment to draw one in.They also bleached their hair in vinegar, which often caused hair loss, so wigs were popular.Long hair was also considered beautiful, as only upper-class women were allowed to grow their hair long. Body positive mentalities were also present as women are depicted with "fuller figures" and considered beautiful.



Steiny Gomez-Jimenez
29
 

Learning Lab Training Collection on the Theme "The Search for an American Identity"

This collection is designed to help educators bridge the classroom experience to a museum visit. It is intended to demonstrate various ways to use the Learning Lab and its tools, while offering specific, replicable, pre-engagement activities that can simply be copied to a new collection and used to help students engage with museum resources. 

Included here: 

  • Section 1: a set of flashcards, a template document so that teachers can create and print their own specific sets, and strategies for their use in their classrooms. 
  • Section 2: a variety of student activities and resources to explore artist Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq," a metaphorical representation of the unrest taking place in Iraq, and more broadly, an exploration of the human condition during times of crisis.  This section includes an image of the work from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, an explanatory video with curator E. Carmen Ramos, two  Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "The 3 Y's" - from Harvard's Project Zero Visible Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and  an array of prompts and Learning Lab tools to help students think critically and globally.  
  • Section 3: a short assignment to get participants started using the Learning Lab.
  • Section 4: spacer tile template to serve as chapter headings in longer collections.

This collection is adapted from a teaching collection on the same theme (Luis Cruz Azaceta's "Shifting States: Iraq" ( http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll...), that includes extension activities. It was created for the 2019 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "The Search for American Identity: Building a Nation Together," - the subject of the Montgomery College - Smithsonian 2019 Fellowship program. 


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
29
 

Activity Collection: CUPCARS!

The Smithsonian and Lenovo want to inspire you to tinker! In this collection, you will learn how to create your very own CUPCAR! Follow steps two through five to create a balloon-powered cupcar, and steps six through eleven to create a motor-powered cupcar. 

Some steps have a yellow “paper clip” icon in the top left corner of the browser. Clicking this icon will reveal extra “Pro-Tips” for helping you build your cupcar.

Once your cupcar is moving, get creative! Try different placements of the parts for more efficiency. Decorate the outside with decals and markers. Race it with your friends!

Dawn Quill
20
 

Investigating the Life of Enslaved People Through Artifacts

In this collection, you will examine artifacts, paintings and text that gives you a window into the life of enslaved people of the US during 1700s and 1800s. I created this content as a way for my 4th grade students to dig deeper in their understanding of enslaved people beyond what our textbook provides. The students are asked to take meaningful analysis of the artifacts and to consider what further inquiries they have. 

#goglobal

While you navigate through this collection, consider:

See Think Wonder Thinking Routine

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Main, Side, Hidden

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the side story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world (issues) story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?
Ellen Rogers
27
 

Ethan Navarro's collection of 1920's and 30's catalog

I am making a catalog of all the objects of the 20's and 30's

Ethan Navarro
19
 

MOLAA Docent Training: Articles

Further Rreading Material

molaa_docent
1
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection addresses the issue of antisemitism in the United States leading up to and during the Holocaust.  Anti semitism was displayed in America through cartoons, preferences of American citizens, discriminatory policies, as well as support for the Nazi party. There was anti semitism present throughout America, and such anti semitism became obvious through a lack of action during the Holocaust.  Juxtaposed against this striking anti semitism are the American people and groups that worked to help Jews and fought for their equality.  Despite the inaction promoted through anti semitism, many groups did work against discrimination and the Nazi goal.

Fiona Mulla
17
 

The Story of America in the Holocaust


Through this curation, one can see a clear story path. It all begins with the struggles that started in Europe that forced these refugees to attempt to flee to asylum. Getting to America, for those trying to escape, was a very difficult feat due to new legislation and American stubbornness towards immigrants. For those lucky enough to get to America, they soon discovered that this “sanctuary” held many of the same prejudice and anti semitic beliefs that were forged in Europe. Overall, this curation was made to track the struggles of Jews through all stages in their journey to America.

MADDIE YP
16
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection will take a deeper look into anti semitism in America juxtaposed to the upstanders who fought back.  By looking at the Holocaust in American society through this dual lense, it illustrates the two extremes in the society.  Bitter and severe hatred was seen on one side as anti semitsm was fueled by racist and elitist attitudes.  But this does not tell the whole story; many efforts were taken by Americans, specifically the Jewish American community, to raise awareness for the cause and in many instances take active steps to help those suffering in Europe.

Allie Doyle
17
 

Culture and Aesthetics Meet Physics: Why Soviet and American Spacesuits Look Different

This collection serves as a preview for the fifth of six seminar sessions in the 2019 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “The Search for an American Identity: Building a Nation Together.”

National Air and Space Museum curator Cathleen Lewis will discuss objects from the Space Race gallery, in particular how spacesuits from the USSR and the United States indicate differing cultural and aesthetic answers to similar engineering challenges. 

Resources included in this collection have been recommended by the presenter for participants to explore before the seminar itself.

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

8th Grade Spanish Literacy: Mi Comunidad

This collection is for an 8th grade Spanish Literacy unit on community, but it can be used for any secondary ed unit on a topic related to community. The essential questions that guide student learning are: What is a community? How am I shaped by my community? There are 5 instructional activities attached to this collection that can be used to explore the concept of community and help students generate understandings in response to the essential questions. These lessons include activities related to project-based learning, oral presentation, experiential learning through field trips, viewing artworks using thinking routines, and writing poetry.  The images included in the collection serve as options that pair well with the thinking routines or any other activities that teachers might like to use to explore this topic with their students. #GoGlobal


Maria Fernanda Garcia
50
 

Paths to Perspective: How the Past Connects to Our Present

This lesson is inspired by Out of Eden Learn, the journey of Paul Salopek, and the idea that each person is an amalgamation of the people and events that came before them. These people and events include the nature of their birth, the lives of their parents, the experiences of their grandparents, the creation of the printing press, etc. The idea behind this lesson is, in its inception, to expose students to milestones in black history, and to use that rich history to challenge them to look into their past to see how they connect to larger events that came before them last week or even a century or millennia ago.

This lesson is especially crafted for Black History Month (though of course it can be used at other times) to have students from multiple ethnic backgrounds try to find a connection to the African American Experience in the United States. It removes students from an ethnic vacuum and asks them to see how the journey of others not like them has an impact on their, their family's and their country's history.

To begin your use of this collection please read the lesson plan at the beginning labeled Lesson Plan: Paths To Perspective. It is the full lesson for using this Learning Lab collection. You may use it in full or alter as you see fit for the needs of your class. It is by no means exhaustive, especially in terms of Project Zero ideas that can be used with the collection, but it is a good starting point for how to use this material in class.

#goglobal

Sean Felix
24
 

The Portrayal of Powerful Women In Visual Art: A Study Spanning Ancient Egypt, Baroque and Renaissance eras, Through Impressionism, and Pop and Modern Art

This third and final collection “The Portrayal of Powerful Women In Visual Art: A Study Spanning Ancient Egypt, Baroque and Renaissance Periods, Through Impressionism, and Pop and Modern Art” has been building up since the beginning of this project. I cannot stress enough how passionate I am about representing women as strong and powerful beings and I think it is so important to look back over history and find the times that was done despite attitudes towards women. Women have always been viewed as the weaker sex, until very recently in fact. However, the quiet and prevailing strength of women has a thread that is woven back to the dawn of time. As I have stated in a previous collection, visual art is an important way to document our collective present so that future generations may have greater understanding of our ways of thinking, values and more. My goal for these collections was to exemplify the power that was evident in a woman over time and I feel that I have achieved that. This collection spans time and cultures including ancient Egypt, the Renaissance and Baroque periods, Impressionism, and pop and modern art. Influential, resilient, and robust women always have and always will have a role to play in visual art.

For my museum paper, I took a close look at impressionism, especially Claude Monet (see the final tile in the collection). “Camille Monet on a Garden Bench” by Claude Monet is an oil on canvas, impressionist painting capturing Monet’s first wife, Camille, whom he painted often.  Impressionism came to be in France in the middle of the nineteenth century and Claude Monet is one of the names you immediately associate with this style of painting. Monet is a household name in the realm of impressionist painting and “Camille Monet on a Garden Bench” is just one of the many famous works he produced in his lifetime. In this painting, her expression is one of quiet defeat and her large, dark eyes seem exhausted as if she is mentally somewhere else while her gaze is fixed directly on the viewer. Her body is hunched over rather than up straight to greet her neighbor. The viewer feels her sadness and I think that is in part because of the contrast in the image. The rest of the painting is bright, sunny and filled with color, things associated with happiness and lightness. Camille is clothed in a dark, heavy looking dress seemingly under the shadow of a tree which I interpret as the metaphorical cloud hanging over her with the sad news of her fathers passing. Monet captures her strength and femininity all at once.

Pop and modern art seem much more literal in what it expresses and is an excellent reflection of society at that point in time. While women still weren’t considered equal, they were still being depicted in visual art and it was typically women of high standard and fame. These women were respected in their fields and were considered icons of their generation; women like Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Billie Holiday, Aretha Franklin, even Queen Elizabeth II. Visual art and its representation of a woman’s place in society still had a long way to go, but by looking at the women, we can tell they know their strength and that is what’s most important.

What I have put together in this collection represents the significance of women at points through history and I hope you will take something away from it. I hope it will spark debate, deeper thought, an emotional response, or even desire to learn more about the culture or time period being represented.

#AHMC2019 

Dana Cox
19
 

Classical Period Developing into the Romantic Period

The collection begins with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and his masterpiece Symphony No. 40.  Mozart was designed to be the first aspect of this particular collection because he is probably the most famous name to come out of the Classical Period of music.  He is accompanied by a photograph of the composition of his famous Symphony No. 40 because that symphony meant so much to what Mozart brought to the Classical Period in terms of music.  Mozart may have been a master at his craft, but he was not the "Father," which brings me to my next point.

The middle section of the collection contains a painting of Franz Joseph Haydn who was one of the most influential names in music during the Classical Period as he had a lot to do with the transition into the Classical Period from the previous Baroque Period.  Haydn is accompanied by a photograph of one of his more famous piano trio composition as a composer.  Haydn was nicknamed the "Father of Symphony" and "Father of the String Quartet."  Symphony and string quartet are two of the few things Haydn brought to music during the time period, as well as chamber music and the piano trio.

The final section of the collection contains a painting of Ludwig van Beethoven who was one of, if not the very most famous composer (as well as being a pianist) from the Classical Period of Music.  Beethoven was the main driving force at the end of this musical era as he was such a pivotal aspect of the transition into the later Romantic Period.  Beethoven's portrait is accompanied with one of his most famous composition of Symphony No. 5.  If someone says they haven't heard Beethoven's 5th Symphony, throw it on your phone's playlist and let them listen, I'm sure they've heard it.  The symphony is wildly famous and so is the deaf man that wrote it.

References:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_van_Beethoven

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ludwig-van-Beethoven

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Haydn

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Haydn

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Wolfgang-Amadeus-Mozart

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang_Amadeus_Mozart

#AHMC2019

Nathan Renaud
6
 

Women and Their Literary Work in the Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, the Church exerted the greatest influence over how women were perceived, women did not have the opportunity to raise as warriors or queens as in the Ancient Times. 

The two main alternatives for a medieval woman were to marry, or to 'take the veil' and become a nun. Almost all female orders required women to live behind the walls of a monastery or within an individual cell, living a life of contemplation, prayer and work. However, there were some women, who broke with the traditional roles assigned to them in several ways during a time when women had no legal rights and were considered a man's property.

Take Heloise for example, she scandalized the 12th century France by having an love affair with her tutor. The letters she exchanged with Abelard  are being read to this day, through them we follow their tragic and passionate love affair. Another women, Hildegard of Bingen is known for her writings and music, her music is still performed today, and her spiritual works are read as examples of a feminine interpretation of church and spiritual ideas. 

Marie de France, was considered the most revolutionary writer of her time, as it was not common practice for women to author any texts at all, and so was Christine de Pizan, who become the first women to support herself and her children through writing after her husband died and she was left alone.

I have also included a fictional character in this collection, Sheharazad, the narrator of The One Thousand and One Nights.  The female characters in the stories fight to make their own choices and live according to their beliefs about freedom, sexuality, and love, as the other women in this collection.













bbridgette
6
673-696 of 944 Collections