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Found 908 Collections

 

Dorothea Lange

A photographic study of the Great Depression.

Sarah Dahl
16
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Braceros": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Domingo Ulloa's

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Rubina Pantoja
10
 

Dogs

Different dogs and a story called The Night I Followed the Dog

Linda Jaeger
24
 

Do symbols mean the same thing in every culture?

Plains Native people have always depicted star images on their clothing, tipis, and containers.

Formative Task: In a class discussion list three ways Western cultures think about stars. Use this collection to discover what stars mean to the Lakota and other Native people.

Summative Performance Task: Use the star quilt pattern to create a symbolic quilt that represents your school.


National Museum of the American Indian Education Office
15
 

Distance Learning: Teaching Persepolis

The purpose of this collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for novel study
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text
Sher Anderson Petty
32
 

Dismissing the Dead White Guy

This collection explores the necessity, logic, and fairness of the inclusion and/or exclusion of people of history based on gender and/or race. 

Lessons include

Looking Using the Puzzle Strategy

Looking using several various strategies. 

Easily customization by simply using as an individual or group lesson or by requiring all, some, or one of the additional group portraits.

Researching People and Inventions

Recognizing Bias and Objective Analysis

Understanding the Difference Between Bias and Prejudice

Argumentative Essay Writing (Designed as a timed writing for AP Lang, but the prompt could easily be turned into a formal writing assignment. 


#NPGteach

Deborah Eades
15
 

Discovering Korea Through an Object

This collection was created as an introduction to Korea and its culture by focusing on one object in the Freer/Sackler Museum.  "Water dropper in the form of a duck." Interdisciplinary lesson for Media (information literacy, research skills), Art (calligraphy), and Music (children’s songs).  

Susan Schmidt
6
 

Discover the Story: A Miner's Life

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in as a miner. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.

Tags: Pennsylvania, narrative, Pittsburgh, mining, miner, immigration, coal, worker safety, child labor
Kate Harris
16
 

Disabled Doesn't Mean Unable

George Pagano

Four – Six 45 minute Class Periods

Lesson Overview:

This lesson plan unit is built around the exploration of identity for individuals with disabilities. Students will be asked to examine several items in the collection and answer the following essential questions:  How can unfair/fair depictions of an individual with a disability affect their identity?  How can positive depictions empower an individual?

This theme will be combined with a component of advocacy and change: How can one advocate to make a difference? What causes a change in one's belief system? How can a portrait or image inspire change? How can a portrait or image document change?

Lessons are designed for an 8th grade interdisciplinary team approach: English, social studies, and art class. The plan for this unit includes the synthesis of visual images within the historical context of the promotion of rights for individuals with disabilities.

The subject of self-identity - the recognition of one's potential and qualities as an individual will be explored as well.  

George Pagano
16
 

Digital Technology and You: Scrolling along the Electronic Superhighway

This collection will facilitate a series of activities combined into a short unit encouraging students to consider the development of digital technology  and their relationships to it through Electronic Superhighway: Continental U.S., Alaska, Hawaii by Nam June Paik. It will consist of several activities that will require class time, as well as time to compose, draft, and revise an argumentative essay. My intention is to make this series of activities fairly flexible. I could imagine completing these activities in about a week (five 50-minute class periods), or taking as much as three weeks to get all the way through with supplementation - maybe of other pieces of a similar aesthetic - and time in class to write. 

The collection has internal instructions on several of the pieces that are designed to be used either in the classroom or by students independently at home - feel free to change them or disregard them. 

For a more detailed rundown of what I have in mind for this lesson, please see the lesson concept write-up in the collection. 

#SAAMteach #visiblethinking

Mathieu Debic
22
 

Digital Storytelling with Museum Objects in the Smithsonian Learning Lab (RDMF Conference Workshop)

This Learning Lab collection was made to complement the presentation, "Digital Storytelling with Museum Objects in the Smithsonian Learning Lab," at the RDMF20: RDM and Data Sharing/Openness in the Arts conference on 3 June, 2020.  The conference is hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Digital Curation Centre, a world-leading centre of expertise in digital information curation with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management.  

During the workshop,  co-facilitated by Dr. Antonia Liguori (Loughborough University, UK) and Dr. Philippa Rappoport (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), participants will be introduced to both the Learning Lab and Digital Storytelling (DS) as platforms to explore museum objects in relation to data sharing and openness in the arts. This session will demonstrate a variety of techniques to incorporate personal experiences in the exploration and use of museum resources, and will share how the Smithsonian Learning Lab can be used to access digital resources, build learning experiences, and cultivate collaboration and community over distance.

We will explore artwork from an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, Eye to I: Self-Portraiture as an Exploration of Identity), which compels viewers to consider how self-portraits reflect an artist’s identity through what is revealed and concealed. We will look specifically at the Eye to Eye artworks from the context of social distancing and unrest in the time of Covid-19 as a prompt to make personal connections. 

After an introduction to the Smithsonian Learning Lab and previous experiences with Digital Storytelling within that environment, participants will be engaged in discussions about: 

  • how Digital Storytelling can supplement and inform ontologies and metadata to extract meanings from museums' digital collections and therefore activate data to inform curatorial practice in museums;
  • how Digital Storytelling can enhance the educational values of museums’ objects and stimulate multiple contexts of understanding and co-creation;
  • how digital technology, applied not necessarily in museum spaces, can connect local communities to the museum, and in particular how Digital Storytelling could facilitate this discourse by engaging hard to reach audiences.

You will find in this collection:

  • a short icebreaker activity using exhibition images to start shifting from a cognitive appreciation of art to a personal connection to museum objects;
  • some examples of annotated objects that demonstrate the functionality of the Learning Lab;
  • some examples of digital stories made by other educators during previous Digital Storytelling workshops 'embedded' in the Learning Lab;
  • a description of the Digital Storytelling process;
  • workshop participants' reflections; 
  • supplemental resources. 


Philippa Rappoport
36
 

Digital Storytelling to Explore Latinx History, Arts and Culture

This Learning Lab collection was made to support teachers and educators participating in the "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" Workshop, to reflect on their experience. This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

This workshops is organised by the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and aims at sharing digital resources and tools for the classroom available from the Smithsonian Learning Lab (learninglab.si.edu). During the workshop,  co-facilitated by Dr Antonia Liguori (Loughborugh University, UK) and Dr Philippa Rappoport (SCLDA), participants will learn how to create a lesson plan using digital resources and how to enhance their students' learning experience through Digital Storytelling.

In particular this collection represents an introduction on how to apply Digital Storytelling within the Learning Lab as a teaching strategy and a self-reflective tool to stimulate active and deep learning.

You will find here:

- a short ice-breaker activity to start shifting from a cognitive appreciation of art to a personal connection to museum objects;

- some examples of digital stories made by other educators during previous Digital Storytelling workshops 'embedded' in the Learning Lab;

- a description of the Digital Storytelling process, with templates for storyboarding and a few tips for audio and video editing;

- some prompts to start drafting a script for the Digital Story that will be made in a following workshop.

#LatinoHAC

Antonia Liguori
24
 

Digital Storytelling Collection

The images used in my Digital Storytelling video.

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

Esteban Hernandez
8
 

Digital Storytelling Collection

The images used in my Digital Storytelling video.

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

GABRIEL GUTIERREZ-HERN
8
 

Digital Storytelling

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

The Power of Guilt in Sarah Winchester's Motivation to build the Winchester House

KRISTEN LILJA
13
 

Developing Historical Thinkers with American Art

Resources supporting the February 2016 Google Hangout facilitated by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in coordination with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

#historicalthinking


Elizabeth Dale-Deines
11
 

Designing For Accessibility–Tova Kleiner

This Learning Lab showcases different examples of accessible design in order to provide a fuller understanding of what designing for accessibility can look like. The collection shown here includes designs that address physical, cognitive, and emotional barriers that impact the lives of people with disabilities. This Learning Lab explores design for the blind, for wheelchair accessibility, for the elderly, and for people with autism. Through the DesignPrep Scholars program, I have learned about various design disciplines and focuses. DesignPrep Scholars gave me the opportunity to meet several inspirational designers and do many design projects. Throughout this experience, I have been especially drawn to design that is inclusive and accessible. This Learning Lab is the culmination of my work at DesignPrep Scholars and displays what I have learned about accessible design.

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
22
 

Design Storytelling: Creating Narratives around Design Objects

Try something new with us. Selecting from the objects in this collection, pulled from current Cooper Hewitt exhibitions Contemporary Muslim Fashions and Willi Smith: Street Couture, craft a narrative, real (researched) or imagined. Think of it as a creative exercise using creatively-designed objects. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Expressive Letterform

Follow along to design an expressive letterform inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Communication Design, Jennifer Morla

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 5 | Ages 9-12

Typography Today

A new “type” of camp activity! Discover the creativity of designing type and lettering. From cursive to calligraphy, campers will learn about typography through gallery explorations and off-site field trips and create their own letterforms.

Project Partner Aditi Panchal

Aditi Panchal is a Hand Lettering artist and designer based in Oklahoma City. Along with being a full time graphic designer, she owns Aditi Panchal Designs, a business that allows her to design stationery and paper products.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 9-10 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
19
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 6-8 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
16
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