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Found 882 Collections

 

Design It Yourself: Design A Vehicle

Follow along to design a paper 3-dimensional model of a vehicle. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Utensil

Follow along to design an unusual utensil. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Streetscape

Follow the steps to design a streetscape. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a School

Follow along to design a school inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Architecture Design, Mass Design Group.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Design it Yourself: Design a Prototype for a User

Learn to think like a designer by prototyping a solution engineered for a specific user. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
23
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Poster

Follow along to use elements such as color, line, and composition to design a poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
24
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Pencil

Follow along to design a pencil that will be comfortable to hold through a long school day.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Park

Follow along to design a park inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Landscape Architecture, Surfacedesign.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
24
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Park

Follow along to design a park inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Landscape Architecture, Surfacedesign.

Gerald Smith
24
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Mobile Food Service

Follow along to design a mobile food service that helps to get locally grown food to your home.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Habitat

Follow along to design a habitat that can exist within an urban space.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Green Roof

Follow along to design a green roof or roof garden that will help keep a city or building cool.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
12
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Green Roof

Follow along to design a green roof or roof garden that will help keep a city or building cool.

sara gottlieb
10
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Chair

Follow the steps to design a chair, inspired by 2018 National Design Award winner for Product Design Blu Dot's Real Good Chair. 

Katherine Keogh
18
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Chair

Follow the steps to design a chair, inspired by 2018 National Design Award winner for Product Design Blu Dot's Real Good Chair. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

Design It Yourself: Design a Bus Stop

Follow along to design a bus stop that keeps you warm. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
11
 

Depictions of Water in American Impressionist Painting

This collection explores different water scenes painted by nineteenth and twentieth century American impressionists. It looks at both technical vocabulary for art, and Impressionism as a movement. It uses multiple mediums and explores different artists over the period.

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to Impressionist techniques in art, we well as specifically introduce American Impressionist painting.
  • Encourage discussion of the representation of water in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Water/Ways.
  • Teach some foundational artistic concepts and vocabulary at the intermediate level to students, including: basic color theory, brushwork, expression, and mood.

Students should be able to:

  • Describe visual elements of painting with specific vocabulary.
  • Compare multiple paintings and artists, in terms of specific visual elements.
  • Compare artwork based on the representation of a specific subject: water.
  • [Optional Activity] Reproduce at least one technique from the following categories: color and brushwork.  
SITES Museum on Main Street
18
 

Depictions of Water in American Impressionist Painting

This collection explores different water scenes painted by nineteenth and twentieth century American impressionists. It looks at both technical vocabulary for art, and Impressionism as a movement. It uses multiple mediums and explores different artists over the period.

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to Impressionist techniques in art, we well as specifically introduce American Impressionist painting.
  • Encourage discussion of the representation of water in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Water/Ways.
  • Teach some foundational artistic concepts and vocabulary at the intermediate level to students, including: basic color theory, brushwork, expression, and mood.

Students should be able to:

  • Describe visual elements of painting with specific vocabulary.
  • Compare multiple paintings and artists, in terms of specific visual elements.
  • Compare artwork based on the representation of a specific subject: water.
  • [Optional Activity] Reproduce at least one technique from the following categories: color and brushwork.  
Mary Byrne
18
 

Depictions of Children

Viewers will consider how images of children have changed over the past 300 years. Artwork selections include a large variety of individual and group portraits of both male and female sitters/subjects in a variety of styles for the purpose of analyzing the elements of portraiture (expression, pose, clothing, hairstyle, setting, objects, etc...) in order to help students gain a better understanding of social norms in the context of place and time. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018Learning to look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Michelle Zimmerman
60
 

Deciphering the Code: Understanding Messages Through Symbol Exploration

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover the complexity behind symbols found in art and artifacts.  Curiosity and wonderment are sparked as students use close looking strategies to precisely describe what they see.  Students can then apply these findings to reveal a deeper meaning behind the symbols and the identities of the designer and users.  Students will be inspired to create their own stamps as they explore how symbols share messages and bridge connections to people and diverse cultures.

Andrea Croft
31
 

Decades of Transformation: Bridging the 1920s and 30's

Each item in this collection reflects the changing culture of America between the two World Wars. As we read The Great Gatsby and Of Mice and Men, consider how these pieces show the change of mindset across the decades.

Your task: select 5 artifacts and write a short paragraph for each saying how the object relates to 1) the era it is from, 2) to two texts, and 3) the other objects in you collection. Do not answer the three items like a list; rather, think about having your entire paragraph answer these questions: Why did I choose this object for this collection? What does it add to the whole? How can I interpret this object for the visitors of my gallery?

For your writing voice, sound authoritative, like a museum placard (those little signs next to objects). You do not need direct text evidence, but you do need to reference one or both of the texts.

Jacob Carlson
29
 

DBQ: Dust Bowl

Answer the questions based on the documents. Remember to observe the picture/writing first and then move toward analysis. 

Keywords: poverty, rural, urban, new deal, inquiry strategy, global context, 1930s, 30s, dust bowl, 

Bryan Pasquale
5
 

DBQ: Dust Bowl

Answer the questions based on the documents. Remember to observe the picture/writing first and then move toward analysis. 

Keywords: poverty, rural, urban, new deal, inquiry strategy, global context, 1930s, 30s, dust bowl, 

Mary Godley
5
 

Daniel Boone and American Ginseng: Truth and Legend

Who was Daniel Boone? Was he more than a stereotypical American frontier hero? Explore Daniel Boone and his relationship to the native plant, ginseng, through this collection and series of activities. 

Daniel Boone (1734-1820) spent much of his adult life blazing trails through the American wilderness. Through exploration and opening the wilderness, Boone and others were able to exploit its many rich resources, including the profitable plant American ginseng. He rose to the status of American legend, becoming known as someone who braved hardship and danger to bring the earth's resources to the market. The legend of Daniel Boone and his-lost-ginseng illustrates the way such stories can reflect historical fact. But become exaggerated or distorted through many generations of story tellers, and, now, via the internet. History and fiction become intertwined. 

While the days of American pioneers are long gone, people still search for and gather wild ginseng in the mountainous regions that Boone frequented. Learn more about Boone's adventures and American ginseng throughout this collection. Be sure to click the Information icon to learn more about each item. 

To learn more about Daniel Boone and his efforts to explore the wilderness, visit the Learning Lab collection -The Wilderness Road- .

Julia Eanes
25
649-672 of 882 Collections