Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(1,145)
(5,742)
(5,909)
(4,407)
(6,560)
(77)
(2,432)
(1,730)
(762)
(2,979)
(1,133)
(1,028)

Found 6,887 Collections

 

Pio Pico State Historic Park

Pío Pico is one of California's most important and fascinating historical figures. Born a poor soldier’s son in a frontier Spanish mission, he gained wealth and status as a businessman, cattle rancher, and politician during Mexican Era California - serving twice as governor. At the height of his power, he owned over 500,000 acres of land, including 5 large ranches. Today, what remains of his vast holdings is his adobe house located on a few acres of land that were once part of his 9,000-acre ranch, El Ranchito. 

His adobe house at El Ranchito was built around 1850 and is a reflection of the rancho lifestyle in Southern California of the time and his active contribution to the development of American California. Today, the adobe is beautifully restored with historic gardens at Pio Pico State Historic Park in Whittier, CA. Explore the adobe house, the gardens, and learn about what life was like on the ranch, the culture and history of the Californios, and the life of Pio Pico. 

CA State Parks Los Angeles
18
 

50 Ways to Look at a Big Mac Box

When you work in museums, you learn that almost anything can tell you a story. You just need to know the right questions to ask!

Based on John Hennigar Shuh's essay "Teaching Yourself to Teach with Objects," this is an activity that takes a familiar object - a Big Mac box - and places it in an unexpected context - museum collections. The practical observation activity is then followed with a comparison with Big Mac boxes from the National Museum of American History and a discussion about why they are included in the Smithsonian Institution.

This collection is designed to help teachers and students learn how to look at museum objects through guided observation. It is intended to expand your understanding of material culture and develop transferrable skills to carry out any object observation!

The aim of this activity is also to become more familiar with the kind of work done by conservators and curators in museums, and how they use objects to understand history. Like detectives looking for clues, conservators can focus on the technical details to learn how an object was made or how it was used. Curators can use object observation, interviews and archival research to look for the bigger picture and learn how the object can tell a story about society. Communicating these professions to young children through practical activities is a good way to make big institutions more approachable. 

This exercise works best if you bring a Big Mac box into the classroom: you will be doing work similar to what is done in museums and you can use all five senses to carry out the observation. If you can't get a hold of a Big Mac box, any food container will do! Some examples could be a box of pasta or a can of beans. Adapt the questions to suit the object and make your own object observation pathway!

#MuseumFromHome

Celine Romano
6
 

Gender Equality

Mai Khanh Nguyen
5
 

Exploring Identity through Portraiture

Exploring Identity through Portraiture explores the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture as a means to convey individual, community/cultural, and national identity. By analyzing portraits, including self-portraits, students will consider how the artists tell the sitters’ stories, paying attention to how the artists’ choices reveal some—but perhaps not all—aspects of the sitters’ identity. Students will explore how portraiture can be an avenue that they can use to represent their own identities and make meaning of what is important to them.


Curriculum Connections: This lesson plan is suitable for students in grades 4-12 Civics and Visual Arts classes. 


Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be better able to: 

• Examine how modern and contemporary artists use portraiture to reveal aspects of a sitter’s individual, community/cultural, and national identity. 

• Identify key components of a portrait and discuss what one can learn about the sitter through these components. 

• Discuss the artistic choices that portrait artists make and consider how such decisions can reveal the artists’ viewpoints and also influence the viewers’ understanding of the sitters’ identity. 

• Use the museum’s collection as a gateway to investigating and exploring one’s own individual, community/cultural, and national identity.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
68
 

Going for the Gold: The Olympics

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the Olympics. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about the Olympics, the Special Olympics and athletes who competed. Families can also read articles about the Olympics, learn about the first Olympics, and explore the amazing athletes who have competed to be the best. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Hustle in Our Muscles

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring muscles. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about muscles, watch how animals use their muscles, and listen to the read aloud Sebastian's Roller Skates. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
43
 

Dance Dance Revolution

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring damce. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about dance, watch different dances around the world, and try some GoNoodle dances. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
34
 

My Life as a Refugee

"No one plans to become a refugee—to flee your home because your life is in danger. Yet today, there are 25.9 million refugees, more than the world has seen in nearly a century.

There are many reasons a person might become a refugee.

Maybe you live in a country torn apart by war, and your house was bombed to rubble.

Maybe you live in a place where you and your family are being attacked for your religious beliefs.

Maybe you live in a region plagued by famine, and you are facing starvation.

Or maybe you are like 15-year-old Bilan, and you were chased from your home by violence."

Lewis, K. (2019, September). I Live in a Refugee Camp. Scholastic Scope.

As you read Bilan's story, look at the photos and artwork included in this collection. These include all types of refugees from many locations and times in history. 

Choose one photo or document that speaks to you. Research it by looking at the "more info" tab. You may also conduct your own personal research. You can use the questions below to guide your research and thinking.

  • What was the primary reason these people were fleeing? 
  • What made them refugees?
  •  How does this particular document make you feel?  
  • How can you make connections between the experiences of the people in the documents and Bilan's experience?

Write a (minimum) one page essay in response to this collection and the story My Life as a Refugee. Share it with me via Office 365.

Amanda Dillard
12
 

Art & Culture Guessing Game

1. Can you guess who made these? Look at each picture and decide which type of maker created it:      Painter, Sculptor, Potter, Printmaker, Weaver, Architect

2. Can you guess what culture or time these things are from?  Write your guess, then click on the picture. Click the  i  symbol to learn the answer.

3. Choose a picture and tell why  you think this object is special or useful.

4.  How do you think it expresses something important to the people of that culture?

Jean-Marie Galing
24
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
47
 

The Industrial Revolution

This collection will explain the changes brought to American Life during the Industrial Revolution.

Thomas Gray
5
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring superheroes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about creating Marvel Comics as well as a video about a really amazing comic book store owner. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

The Plantation South

This collection will examine the Plantation South and the Cotton kingdom.

Thomas Gray
7
 

Flight School Math Collection

This lesson focuses on the four forces of flight and the control surfaces of aircraft.  It applies these concepts  to activities with a free flight simulator where students can practice landing and maintaining correct glide scope on final. 

Students will:
  • Understand how axes of flight, controls surfaces, flight controls, and aircraft instruments are used to control a plane during approach and landing. 
  • Practice flying an aircraft using flight controls and instruments. 
  • Use math to determine the best approach to a runway for landing.
  • Apply their knowledge of flying an aircraft to use a flight simulator to practice how to approach and land at an airfield.

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
14
 

Geometry in Buildings

This is a virtual field trip for students to see points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles.

Linda Jaeger
17
 

World War II at Home and Beyond

The Second World War (1939-1945), while global, did not fully impact the United States until the military attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941. This collection is a snapshot of the lives of Americans both on the battlefield and on the Homefront. Portraiture can be used as a springboard into deeper discussions about biography and our collective history. Users of this collection are encouraged to take into account how the sitter’s social and political identities play a role in how they experienced the war.

Guiding questions:

Who are the notable political and military figures of the war? How does portraiture capture their respective reputations?

In what ways did the Second World War impact the lives of men and women from underrepresented groups? What is the legacy of this impact?

How did the entertainment industry rally around the troops during the war?

What was the role of journalism, literature, and documentary film during the war? How were these formats used to disseminate information to the American public?


Ashleigh Coren
48
 

Making: Design a Protest Poster

Inspired by a workshop activity hosted by 2018 National Design Award winner for Communication Design Civilization, download the included worksheet and follow along to create your own visually-impactful protest poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Easy PZ: See / Think / Wonder (Iceman Crucified #4)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "See / Think / Wonder" with an artwork from the Smithsonian American Art Museum. #visiblethinking #saamteach

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Eight Legged Fantastic!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring spiders. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about spiders and arachnids as well as listen to the read aloud Sophia's Masterpiece. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about spiders and scorpions. They can also explore art inspired by spiders and Spiderman the superhero. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

rajeeva voleti
58
 

Jazz and the Machine

How did artists and designers "picture" the kinetic sounds of American Jazz? In what ways did jazz music and dance forms become commodified, and even used as a touristic experience for middle-class Americans and international listeners? And, most importantly, how did these musical forms propagate a new creative culture during the Harlem Renaissance and beyond? Find out on this short tour of paintings, prints, ceramics, musical instruments, and sound recordings. 

Katie Anania
9
 

Elementary Economics

This playlist on economics is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create a marketplace that demonstrates understanding of basic economic principles.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
76
 

Spanish-American War

This collection highlights artifacts and secondary sources to help students explore the history of the Spanish-American War. Specific topics referenced in this collection include the explosion of US Maine and political and military figures.

Time Period: April 21, 1898 - August 13, 1898 (approx. 5 months)

National Museum of American History
24
 

Pandemics: a Comparison

World History supplemental unit resources for comparison of two global pandemics. Students choose two pandemics. Choose a tact of analysis through the lens of government intervention, or economic, or impact of healthcare industry. 

Ann Sperske
12
6337-6360 of 6,887 Collections