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Found 6,900 Collections

 

Ancient Egypt: Sarcophaguses and Coffins

This is a collection of sarcophaguses and coffins from Ancient Egypt. The sarcophagus refers to the outer layer of protection for an important mummy, and would generally be carved or painted with images representing the deceased person. As you look through the collection, notice the difference between the sarcophaguses and coffins and pay attention to the kinds of images you see. What are common features that you might find on any sarcophagus? What kinds of things are different depending on who it is that is buried?
Kim Palermo
7
 

Ancient Egypt: Sarcophaguses and Coffins

This is a collection of sarcophaguses and coffins from Ancient Egypt. The sarcophagus refers to the outer layer of protection for an important mummy, and would generally be carved or painted with images representing the deceased person. As you look through the collection, notice the difference between the sarcophaguses and coffins and pay attention to the kinds of images you see. What are common features that you might find on any sarcophagus? What kinds of things are different depending on who it is that is buried?
Kate Harris
6
 

Ancient Egypt: Canopic Jars

This is a collection of canopic jars, which were used to store the organs of the deceased in the burial chambers of ancient Egyptians. As you look through these images, think about what kinds of characteristics they all have in common. What differences do you see? Pay attention to materials used, shape of the jars, and images on the lids.
Kate Harris
7
 

Ancient Egypt: Canopic Jars

This is a collection of canopic jars, which were used to store the organs of the deceased in the burial chambers of ancient Egyptians. As you look through these images, think about what kinds of characteristics they all have in common. What differences do you see? Pay attention to materials used, shape of the jars, and images on the lids.
Kim Palermo
7
 

Ancient Egypt: A Variety of Artifacts

A learning collection to be used for student research projects.
Kim Palermo
69
 

Ancient Egypt: A Variety of Artifacts

A topical collection to be used for student research projects.
Kate Harris
55
 

Ancient Egypt: A Variety of Artifacts

A learning collection to be used for student research projects.
Jennifer Costello
55
 

Ancient Egypt Artifact Examples

Ancient Egypt Artifact Examples
Sarah Shelley
19
 

Ancient Egypt

Explore the vast resources on Ancient Egypt that the Smithsonian has to offer.

Brooke Shoemaker
40
 

Ancient Egypt

#teachinquiry

Candice Perri
5
 

Ancient Egypt

working with artifacts

Mary Ann Frankola
11
 

Ancient Egypt

Explore the vast resources on Ancient Egypt that the Smithsonian has to offer.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
40
 

Ancient Egypt

Kim Palermo
5
 

Ancient Egypt

Nicole Hancock
16
 

Ancient Civilizations: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
11
 

Ancient Civilizations- Ancestral Puebloans

This collections is comprised of sources discussing: how do we remember ancient civilizations? What are they remembered for? This collection is focused on Ancestral Puebloans. What do these objects tell us? #TeachingInquiry 

Caitlin Plunkett
14
 

Ancient Civilizations - Egypt

Artworks about Egypt in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's collection.

Peg Koetsch
40
 

Ancient Civilizations

William Randolph Hearst was a wealthy media mogul who developed a love of art from a young age.  His father was a successful miner and his mother was an art collector and generous philanthropist.  After his mother took him on a year and a half long tour of  Europe when he was 10 years old he developed a lasting love of art and antiquities. He collected original works of art as well as copies all throughout his life.  In this unit you will see some of the antiquities and copies he purchased during his lifetime.  He wrote Julia Morgan a letter in 1927 that stated he saw no reason why San Simeon could not become a museum of the finest things he could secure.  His dream became a reality in 1958 when his estate in San Simeon, California was gifted to the State of California.  Hearst Castle has many fine examples of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman art.  For projects and activities expand the Read More section. 

Here are a list of activities and projects you can explore after viewing the collection of images and their information.

Knowledge (Remembering)

What is the triangular part of a Greek temple called?

Name the 3 types of Greek columns.

What was the reasoning for Roman baths?

How did people feel about Egyptian Art after the discovery of King Tut’s tomb?

What is the definition of a Muse?

Comprehension (Understanding)

How would you compare the Muses to Sekhmet?  How are they alike and how are they different?

What would you consider an example of Egyptian Art from the unit on Ancient Civilization?

 Write in your journal about your favorite Greek/Roman god or goddess.

Who was Zeus?  Would you choose him for a friend?

Explain in your own words the statue Europa. Do you think she had a happy life?

Application (Applying)

Make a family tree of the Greek god/goddess on Mount Olympus.

What does Greek pottery remind you of that we use today?

Draw or paint a picture of a Roman Bath on a very busy day.

Collect 10 examples where Zeus did not act in a very godly or decent way.

 Draw a picture of the muses using clothes and attributes from today.  For example, Thalia, the muse of comedy would be carrying a movie camera to record her plays. 

Analysis (Analyzing)

 When we talk about measurements at Hearst Castle, they are given in standard measurement and metric measurement.  Why do they present both measurements?

How is Europa similar or different to Minerva?  Make a venn diagram.

What can you infer about how people felt about the Muses?

How would you deconstruct a Greek temple?

Do we still see Greek architecture in our buildings today?  Give examples, drawing, or photos.

What distinguishes ancient art from their more modern copies?

(Evaluating)

Compare how the Greeks and Romans treated their loved ones after death and how do we treat our departed today.

How would the tapestries be different if Hannibal had won the Second Punic War?

Why do you think that after all these years that the discus-thrower is considered such a fine athlete?

Why do you think that the United States has never converted to the metric system?

Justify the need for Greek Gods in Greek society.

Creating (synthesis)

Create a podcast about Sekhmet.  What is her history, how does she help the people of Egypt or does she? What would she sound like?

How would you improve Roman baths?

Create a parade floats out of a shoebox.  Each float is showing off a Greek god/goddess and their attributes. Make a parade with your friends.

Negotiate an agreement between Scipio Africanus and Hannibal.

Build a model of a Greek temple. 

Hearst Castle® & Hearst San Simeon State Historical Monument
10
 

Ancient China Artifact Examples

A collection of resources about Ancient China and artifact examples.

Sarah Shelley
28
 

Ancient China

A collection of resources about Ancient China.
Linda Muller
32
 

Ancient China

Images of and related to Ancient China 

Marin Layne Williams
31
 

Ancient Africa and Ancient China

Grade 6 library and social studies collaboration
Erin Kizziar
7
 

Anatomy and Osteology: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

Smithsonian Libraries
12
6265-6288 of 6,900 Collections