Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(333)
(635)
(842)
(769)
(941)
(28)
(431)
(359)
(191)
(444)
(167)
(177)

Found 968 Collections

 

Outside Fun


Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

SOB, SOB and Homegoing: Black Representation and Identity in African and African American Art

The collection contains work from an SAAM summer session from 2018 inspired by SOB,SOB by Marshall and is centered around the reading of Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi. It is meant to be a resource for teachers seeking to consider identity critically, incorporate meaningful diversity, and promote the importance of complex representation. #SAAMteach

Loren Lee
76
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 5 | Ages 9-12

Typography Today

A new “type” of camp activity! Discover the creativity of designing type and lettering. From cursive to calligraphy, campers will learn about typography through gallery explorations and off-site field trips and create their own letterforms.

Project Partner Aditi Panchal

Aditi Panchal is a Hand Lettering artist and designer based in Oklahoma City. Along with being a full time graphic designer, she owns Aditi Panchal Designs, a business that allows her to design stationery and paper products.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

John F. Kennedy Portrait

This activity explores Elaine de Kooning's John F. Kennedy portrait and the process of its creation from sketches to the final piece. The collection includes a video about John F. Kennedy's assassination and prompts learners to better understand how to read this portrait by thinking critically while answering questions.

Christina Shepard
8
 

Jackson Pollock

Are you interested in learning about Jackson Pollock and his "drip" method of painting? If you are, this is the perfect collection for you!

You will be asked questions throughout this collection to help you better understand Jackson Pollock's art work.

Christina Shepard
18
 

Socially Constructed Learning Through Art

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop empathy for others while increasing their cultural intelligence.

This collection was created to support teachers and administrators who wish to better understand the various cultures in their schools.  Using both Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and strategies from Amy E. Herman's Visual Intelligence book, participants will practice articulating cultural perspectives and communicating across differences using artwork and primary sources from the vast collections of the Smithsonian Learning Lab.  Participants will learn how to read a work of art, understand compositional hierarchy, and question what is missing.  The frameworks provided by Project Zero and Amy E. Herman will allow everyone, even those not accustomed to discussing art, a place from which to begin using art as a foundation for building culturally-responsive curriculum.

Participants will see museums as the cultural ambassadors that they are and ask whose culture is being represented and whose is missing and why.  Extending from this inquiry, participants will recognize the role schools play in nurturing and shaping the lives and identities of our students.

Julie Sawyer
24
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 9-10 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
19
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 4 | 6-8 yrs

Happy Feet!

Help your young fashionista take a step into the world of designer footwear. Campers will learn the basics of footwear and shoemaking to make a shoe of their own design. Campers receive a shoemaker toolkit to use throughout the week.

Project Partner  | Brooklyn Shoe Space 

Brooklyn Shoe Space is a co-working studio space for shoemakers and leather workers that are a reliable resource of shoe designers, to encourage creativity in our community through fun educational programming and make shoemaking accessible to a wider audience.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

Depictions of Water in American Impressionist Painting

This collection explores different water scenes painted by nineteenth and twentieth century American impressionists. It looks at both technical vocabulary for art, and Impressionism as a movement. It uses multiple mediums and explores different artists over the period.

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to Impressionist techniques in art, we well as specifically introduce American Impressionist painting.
  • Encourage discussion of the representation of water in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Water/Ways.
  • Teach some foundational artistic concepts and vocabulary at the intermediate level to students, including: basic color theory, brushwork, expression, and mood.

Students should be able to:

  • Describe visual elements of painting with specific vocabulary.
  • Compare multiple paintings and artists, in terms of specific visual elements.
  • Compare artwork based on the representation of a specific subject: water.
  • [Optional Activity] Reproduce at least one technique from the following categories: color and brushwork.  
Mary Byrne
18
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 6-8 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 3 | 9-10 yrs

Bits and Bots

Is your child curious about how things work? Campers will learn a variety of creative and technical skills to design their own multi-function robot. 

Project Partner | Generation Code

At Generation Code, it is our mission to transform students into digital leaders. Using curriculum co-created by educators and coders, we teach the skills needed for kids to advance technologically, creatively, and socially.    

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

 Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp


Cooper Hewitt Education Department
16
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 2 | 6-8 yrs

Make Yourself at Home 

Campers will learn the basic fundamentals of interior design—space, line, form, light, color, texture, function, and pattern to design the perfect 3-dimensional space that reflects each campers’ unique personality and style.

Project Partner | Flavor Paper

Using specific design elements, campers will curate and create a wallpaper for their interior space with Flavor Paper.

Project Partner| Zimmerman Workshop

Campers will design their own mini-furniture with Architecture and Design studio, Zimmerman Workshop. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.

#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 2 | 9-10 yrs

Make Yourself at Home 

Campers will learn the basic fundamentals of interior design—space, line, form, light, color, texture, function, and pattern to design the perfect 3-dimensional space that reflects each campers’ unique personality and style.

Project Partner | Flavor Paper

Using specific design elements, campers will curate and create a wallpaper for their interior space with Flavor Paper.

Project Partner| Zimmerman Workshop

Campers will design their own mini-furniture with Architecture and Design studio, Zimmerman Workshop. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively.  Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges.  Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 6-8 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
20
 

Design Camp 2018 - Week 1 | 9-10 yrs

Week 1 | Places and Spaces

From soaring skyscrapers to sprawling parks, campers will be inspired to design using their environment as a guide. 

About Design Camp

Is your child a designer, tinkerer, or creative thinker? Cooper Hewitt Design Camp offers week-long immersions in the latest advances in design. Guest designers share their problem-solving strategies and engage campers in fun, real-life design challenges. Campers will receive special access to the museum’s permanent collection and enjoy exciting collaborations.

Learn more at cooperhewitt.org/designcamp

Why Cooper Hewitt Design Camp?

At Cooper Hewitt Design Camp, we equip students with the tools necessary to tackle age-appropriate challenges, work collaboratively, and think creatively. Campers master a four-step design process—defining problems, generating ideas, prototyping/making, and testing/evaluating—through a series of fun exercises and design challenges. Each project is carefully crafted to introduce children to design vocabulary, techniques, and processes unique to Cooper Hewitt and applicable to future school assignments and personal explorations.


#chdesigncamp

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
18
 

The Art of American Industry

This collection explores the growth of American industry as seen through the lens of artistic production throughout the twentieth century. It can be paired with a multi-day lesson plan on American industrialization in a Social Studies, History, or Economics context. Students can begin to explore and understand the layered narratives and consequences involved within the rapid chances in mechanized American life. The lesson would begin with students examining the first row of resources to become acclimated to expansive impact of American industry. Students would then be able to use the Connect/Extend/Challenge thinking routine to examine how these fluctuations profoundly reformed societal, familial, and personal relationships. By considering multiple perspectives and outcomes, participants can begin to better identify their connection to broader industrial trends today. 

#SAAMteach

Evan Binkley
33
 

The Changing Image of American Classrooms

The artworks in this collection exemplify just how rapidly classrooms and their students have changed over the past century. What can we learn about the Civil Rights Movement and America's historical challenge of diversity? How might these works allow us to better understand ongoing societal issues in addition to the valuable roles teachers play? 

This Learning Lab collection is intended for a multi-day lesson plan for middle school students. A lesson based off of this collection could be begin with a discussion of the similarities and differences between schooling a century ago and classrooms today. Using a number of individual and group thinking routines, students could then begin to identify historical precedents of discrimination which have existed and/or continue to exist in the American educational system. A close reading of attached articles incorporated with additional thinking strategies would allow students to consider ongoing efforts of activism related to the classroom. 

#SAAMteach


Evan Binkley
36
 

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" Close-Reading: Making Text-to-Art Connections

The selected artwork and learning lab collection offers a historical approach to the transformation of Native Americans into white culture and society. It serves as a purpose to provoke discussion on the historical context of the Indian Removal Act, and gives students an understanding of the main character’s (from the novel "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian) “modern day” internal conflict of erasing or eliminating his Native American culture to immerse into the lifestyle of a white teenager in a predominately white school.

As an introductory activity, students will engage in the see/think/wonder methodology to infer the artists’ purpose for the artwork. This initial activity will help scaffold students’ prior understanding and knowledge of the historical context of Native American history and the forced immersion into white culture. Therefore, after students have had ample time of using visual understanding skills to interpret the artwork, students can explore a “modern-day version” of Sherman Alexie’s image that showcases a juxtaposition of the main character’s internal identity conflict.Similar to the artwork, students will engage in the "connect, extend, and challenge" thinking activity. Students will make connections to the text and real-world connections as a culminating task. Lastly, students will discuss how it extended their thinking and a remaining challenge or wonder students still have. Using their remaining questions, this could lead to several extension activities.

Students can explore other Native American artwork in the learning lab, students can also use the "unveiling stories" strategy to learn more about the Carlisle school. The history of the Carlisle school connects and relates with the novel by adding historical context. Lastly, students can engage in teacher-made or student-made gallery walks using other Native American artwork or imagery to support the reading process of the paired text.


Jacquie Lapple
16
 

Upward Bound Tech & Tour - Intro to the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access' Learning Lab

Taking a great portrait is more than just taking a quick snap of a face. It requires thoughtful contemplation and a variety of choices by the photographer. We'll examine a collection of photographs that illustrate various principles of portrait photography and that will help students to understand the parts of a digital artifact. 

LENS 1 | One lens to consider when looking at an artifact is its context and the impression it gives you. Using "see, think, wonder" strategies, we consider:

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think about it?
  • What makes you say that -- what evidence is there for that - on what are you basing your opinion?
  • What does it make you wonder?
  • Why does something look the way it does or the way it is?


LENS 2 | Analyzing great photographs to provide inspiration for your own photography pursuits 

What makes a strong image?

  • angles (eye-level, high angle, low angle, and bird's eye);
  • light and shadow;
  • framing;
  • shot length (long-shot, medium-shot, close-up, & extreme close-up);
  • mood--capturing a feeling or emotion in a photograph; 
  • scale--how big or small subjects look; and
  • sense of place--capturing the feeling of a place. 

Click into each photo and on the "paper clip" annotation icon to read more information (metadata!)

We will then discuss publishing guidelines and other policies that will help students make their best collections.

Tags: portrait photography, decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, Project Zero


Tracie Spinale
43
 

Caught in the Folds

Students will look at geometry in origami as an inspiration to art, design, and innovations in science.

Using selected Issey Miyake’s fashion designs and connections to origami this Learning Lab Collection will highlight artworks that are designed in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) forms, how to plan/engineer for complexity, and how combinations make a difference in the end product.

Description

Student Instructions

Teacher Notes

Slide 1: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Tank

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz

Encourage students to watch the video more than once.

Slide 2: 2D paper crane

Read about history of the paper crane and cultural significance.

These two slides are visualizations that can help students make connections between origami and Miyake’s work.

Slide 3: 3D paper crane

Slide 4: Origami instructions for paper crane.

Make the crane twice.

One version keep in the 3D form

Second version: Unfold and analyze the line features. If you need to you can use a ruler to accent the lines.

Identify the parallel line properties, types of angles, and any special features of the folds.

Extensions: Make connections between the folds and the aspects of the crane.

Slide 5: Collections in Motion: Folding Miyake Long Skirt

Watch the video, then answer the questions in the quiz, and sketch a rough draft of the 2D plan for the skirt.

Students can watch the video of the skirt a couple of times, answer the questions in the quiz and sketch the skirt. Remind the students that it does not have to be perfect. The goal is to identify the shapes used.

Slide 6: In-Ei Mendori

Students will interview each other and make predictions of what the 2D version of the sculpture will look like.

It is important that they complete the quiz before advancing to the next slide.

Slide 7: In-Ei Mendori

Students will evaluate their prediction of the sculpture.

Possible point for class discussion.

Slide 8: Thinking routine

With your group members answer the questions for one of the Miyake designs.

Slide 9: 40 under 40: Erik Demaine

Watch the video of folding.

Read Erik Dermaine’s short biography and research interests

Students will read about Dermaine’s interests and do some research on the applications of geometry.

Slide 10: Science Innovations

Watch the video on science innovations.

Lead a discussion on the aspects of origami and the importance in problem solving in science.

EXTENSIONS

Slide 11: Fold it website

Connections between biology and origami.

Read through the website and use the folding tool.

Students could make proteins with origami paper and analyse the different line properties and relationships that are on the paper after unfolded.

Additional resources

Documentary on origami- teachers can watch for more background information or use clips during the lesson. 

Article: http://www.opb.org/artsandlife...

#visiblethinking

Amanda Riske
12
 

2018 National High School Design Competition

This Learning Lab was created as a resource for students and teachers participating in the 2018 National High School Design Competition.

This year's competition challenges students to make the everyday accessible by considering a place, process, or object they regularly use, identifying a challenge that a user with a disability might have with it, and designing a solution that addresses that challenge and makes the place, process, or object more accessible for all.

For more details on the competition go to https://www.cooperhewitt.org/2...

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
44
 

The Search for an American Identity

We live in a multicultural, multilingual, multinational America, which offers complicated, imposing, unsettling questions about American identity.  There are no easy answers to what is an American identity or perhaps no answers at all.  What is an American identity is an important subject in an ever changing America, and Smithsonian Institution exhibits and objects on display in various museums help us to seek answers to the question of what is identity and what is American identity.

Mimi Mann
156
601-624 of 968 Collections