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Found 723 Collections

 

Teaching Resources: Drama

This teaching collection includes a variety of resources including video performances, lesson plans and blogs with teaching ideas for bringing role playing to the classroom, as a means of making connections of the past to the present. Includes program ideas from the History Alive theater program at the National Museum of American History and the Portraits Alive program at the National Portrait Gallery.

This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day.
Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Native American Musical Instruments

Music was an important element in the life of Native Americans. It was created through voice and instruments. The combination of voice and sound was quite elaborate and was created to be used for ceremonies, entertainment, relaxation, and healing. Featured within this collection are musical instruments of several Native American groups. The groups featured are the Cheyenne, Seneca, Hopi, Sioux, and Iroquois. The instruments span from the 18th-20th century. Three different classifications of instruments are featured within the collection. The classifications are idiophones(rattles), Membranophones(drums), and aerophones (flutes) and are organized respectively. The purpose of this collection is to provide a visual comparison of similar instruments among tribes in different geographical regions. The instruments display the similarities in craftsmanship and use of natural material among the various groups. Most of the materials are organic in origin (composed of carbon) and include seeds, wood and animal components. The instruments vary to some degree as far as adornment, but the instruments within their classification serve a similar function and produce a similar sound. As previously mentioned, the music produced by these instruments in combination with voice was intricate. Although the sounds created with the instruments were similar, each of the Native Americans groups created a sound that was unique to their region.

Logan Downs
10
 

Pottery

random collection of historical pottery

kelsey myers
10
 

Photography

Candid images- These photographs are a collection of candid shots. Candid photography is when the subject in the image is unaware their photo is being taken; not posed.

Lorelei Gerstemeier
14
 

Ocean life pollution effects

collection of images based on sea life, art and effects of water pollution to use as reference in a lesson or unit on the effect of ocean and water pollution. This could lead into a lesson based on creation of recycled materials as well as a science integrated lesson about how to clean up local water sources and make an positive impact on the environment.

kristen fessler
12
 

An Introduction to Origami Paper Folding

In this activity, students will be introduced to the art of origami paper folding by learning how this tradition has been passed down through generations from an interview with an artisan and how to make an origami paper crane from a fellow student.
Ashley Naranjo
4
 

All You Need is Love

The best of love-themed graphic design in the Smithsonian Institution's collections.

Kate Harris
12
 

Joan Miro

This resources in this collection provide a basic introduction to the life and work of Spanish artist Joan Miró.

Maureen Leary
13
 

Guatemalan Weaving

This collection provides an introduction to the art of weaving practiced in Guatemala.

Maureen Leary
11
 

Puerto Rico - Vejigantes

This collection provides a brief introduction to the Vejigante tradition practiced during the month of February in Puerto Rico, in observance/celebration of Carnival.

Maureen Leary
8
 

Vikings--Myths and Mysteries

The Vikings have inspired many artists, writers, and filmmakers with their bravery and unique way of life. However, many misconceptions have developed and many facts are still unknown. In this collection, students will explore the website for the Vikings exhibit while taking notes on the included worksheet. Then, they'll evaluate three works of art (and a team logo) based on the Vikings to gauge how accurately they represent Viking life. Finally, they will be asked to create their own 2-D or 3-D object representing Viking life.

Tags: Norse, inquiry, Viking, Norway, Greenland, Iceland

Amy Kennedy
7
 

Geometry and Islamic Art

This is a collection of artifacts representing geometric motifs in Islamic art. Students will learn why these complex patterns are so prevalent in Islamic art, practice spotting different types of patterns, and begin to create their own, using just a ruler and a compass. They will also have an opportunity to explore the concept of tessellation using an interactive tool.

tags: geometry, circle, angle, star, mosque, mihrab, tile, Muslim, Islam, religion

Kate Harris
16
 

Art and Technology

A collection of Smithsonian assets related to art and technology.

Neal Stimler
12
 

#NPGteach The Ladies In and Out of the White House: Not Just A Pretty Face

Looking closely at the women married to our President's. Learn more about the individuals and the contributions they themselves made. Using Learning to Look Strategies to go beyond the pretty faces.

Nancy Gavrish
18
 

Soap – History, Uses, and Chemistry

Soap is a common household chemical used around the world. Using the See/Think/Wonder visible thinking tool, this collection explores:

  1. The history of soap,
  2. Why Ivory soap floats,
  3. Why soap can be used for cleaning, and
  4. How is soap made.
Kitty Dang
10
 

Lash's Native American Removal Collection

The objective of this lesson is to use "Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going to and Returning from Washington" as a catalyst for discussion and analysis of the American government's attitude toward South East Native Americans in the early 19th Century that eventually lead to the Trail of Tears.

#SAAMteach
Trail of Tears
Native American
Lash
Georgia Performance Standard: SS8H5
Stephanie Lash
12
 

Jazz Resources for Preschool Students

Resources to support two year olds learning about jazz music and musicians. Includes portraits of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis. Students connect the musician to their instrument, identify the parts of a trumpet and listen to Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" to identify specific instruments in the song. Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center's blog includes an interview with the teacher who originally created and implemented the lesson. Included here are supporting resources of the elements mentioned in her interview.
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Women in 1950s America

A learning resource to help develop students' ability to analyze an image and form an argument. The images in this collection are different portrayals of women in the United States during the 1950s. As you look through them, have your students think about these three key questions:

-What is being shown in the image?

-How is the woman represented in the image? Use concrete details from the image.

-Does the image compare to modern representations of women? Why or why not?

The collection ends with a quiz that can either be used as assignment to gauge the students' ability to pull together their analysis into a conclusion or a class discussion.

Alexander Graves
7
 

Jumping In Lesson

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

The Jumping In lesson helps students to use their creativity in different ways using their five senses (see, hear, touch, taste, and smell). Students will use following sentence starter to help direct students' thinking..

I see, I hear, I touch, I smell, and I taste

The activity can help to exercises their....

Imagination

Creative Writing

Focusing on key details

Asking and answering What, Where, When, When, and How questions

Intro to poetry

Expressive Language

The Jumping In lesson is a great way to start poetry and integrating Social Studies and Science. The activity can be done as a whole group discussion, partner work, or independently.

Maria Menjivar
3
 

My Smithsonian Closet

You could be exceptionally well-dressed if the Smithsonian were your closet.
Kate Harris
29
 

Exploring American Ideals in Art

How can American ideals be defined and expressed in different ways? The United States of America is associated the ideals of Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality. Those values have served as sources of inspiration for artists as goals that the nation aspires to (even if they are not always achieved). This collection contains artworks inspired by one or more of the ideals listed above. Students should choose a work and identify which ideal it relates to: Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality.

In a short essay based on the artwork, students should answer the following questions:

-How would the student define Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, or Equality?

-What is the artist trying to communicate about how this idea plays out in America?

-Does the student agree or disagree with the artist's interpretation?

If desired, students could create their own artwork based on one of the American ideals.

Kate Harris
21
 

Photography: Black and White Portraits of Artists in the Hirshhorn Collection

Black and white portraiture depicting some of the artists in the Hirshhorn Masterworks collection on view, as well as other works in the collection. The following are the artists listed and an example of their work included in the collection. The dates listed below are for when each photograph was taken.

1. Helen Frankenthaler ("Painted on 21st Street") ca. 1950

2. Willem De Kooning ("Woman") 1946

3. Jackson Pollock ("Number 3, 1949: Tiger") 1950

4. Jean Dubuffet ("Limbour as a Crustacean") 1956

5. Yves Klein ("Untitled Anthropometry") 1961

6. Joan Mitchell ("Field For Skies") and Michael Goldberg ca. 1950

7. Joan Miro ("Woman before an Eclipse with her Hair Disheveled by the Wind") ca. 1930

8. Richard Diebenkorn ("Man and Woman in a Large Room") 1963

9. Elaine De Kooning and Franz Kline ("Portrait of J.H. Hirshhorn") 1957

10. Auguste Rodin ("Iris, Messenger of the Gods") 1904

11. Alexander Calder ("29 Discs") ca. 1960

Alexandra Baran
11
 

A House Divided: Photography in the Civil War

How does photography of the Civil War inform us about this period? This teaching collection includes the lesson plan, A House Divided: Photography of the Civil War, published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Students examine Civil War photographs, write captions, and discuss how viewing photographs enhances your understanding of historical events and concepts.
Stephanie Norby
9
601-624 of 723 Collections