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Found 672 Collections

 

Hirshhorn's Pokémon Go Stops

The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden has a number of PokeStops (a place in the physical world where you can pick up "items" to play the mobile geolocation game Pokemon Go).

This collection explores the sculpture and architecture at of the stops at the Hirshhorn. Not all of the works listed as stops in the game are still on view. This collection provides information for the stops no longer on view and for other interesting sculptures nearby!
Ashley Meadows
10
 

Migration at the U.S.-Mexico Border

This activity helps students consider the human experience of migration by analyzing a portrait using "jumping in" strategies to describe the sensory experience; answering a series of guided questions to interpret the portrait before and after reading the informational text about the artist and portrait; and finally, reading relevant articles about migration at the US-Mexican border and using academic vocabulary to describe the push and pull factors at play and other characteristics of this example of migration.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.
TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery

The collection was originally intended for use in Human Geography, specifically the unit on Population Demographics and Migration.

As this collection description is directed toward teachers, the collection itself is written and structured for student use and could be completed independently, in a group classroom setting and/or online.
Kristin Kowalew
4
 

Alison Bechdel

Lehrer's multi-media portrait of acclaimed cartoonist and graphic novelist , Alison Bechdel, is an engaging image. I envision that it could help facilitate a lively discussion and inspire an exploration of self-identity with students at the secondary level in the visual as well as the language arts.

Riva Lehrer's interest in figuration and portraiture stems from living with a visible and significant disability. "Being stared at, and looking back, has colored my work for twenty years. Most of my collaborators have been people with impairments, visible or not. Some have no impairments but qualify for other reasons. We start with long interviews, in order to get a strong narrative sense of the relationship between their body and their life." Lehrer started this portrait of graphic novelist Alison Bechdel while Bechdel was working on Are You My Mother, a follow-up to her memoir, Fun Home. Bechdel provided a full-scale drawing of her mother, which Lehrer then transferred onto paper with blue acrylic. Lehrer says the portrait "grew out of discussions about being haunted by a lost parent, and [the awareness] that one's mother is the ultimate mirror of the self for a daughter."

Alison Bechdel (the sitter)
Riva Lehrer (the artist)
Chicago, IL
2011
Charcoal, mixed media, and 3-D collage on paper
Sandy Hindin Stone
Tammy French
1
 

SAAM Summer Assignment

Lesson Launch for Digital Superhighway investigating Video Art and Instillation Art.
Adam Reinhard
10
 

Reconstruction

Students analyze works of art from the end of the Civil War and Reconstruction to better understand this tumultous time in our nation's history.
Nick Odem
3
 

Pittsburgh at the 1893 Columbian Exposition

The first world's fair exhibited the latest advancements in technology, food production, and the arts. Pittsburgh was represented by Westinghouse, Heinz, Brashear, and Ferris.
Arthur Glaser
36
 

Textured Portraits

Students will analyze portraits for the message or expression communicated through portraits with exceptional texture. Contributing to a discussion with the 30 second look, students will look at an image from the 2016 Outwin exhibit to look deeper and explore and infer the artist's intent and interpret meaning. Students will utilize previously made photobooth self-portraits to begin exploration of Photoshop filters. Each student will create a new and originally produced textured portrait. Further extensions to analyze portraits include: conversation extender and contrast and compare. #NPGteach
Jennifer Fox
16
 

Musical Instruments Across Time

A collection of musical instruments that span a wide variety of origins, cultures, and materials.
Can you guess where each instrument came from, what period in time it's from, who used it, and what family of instruments it belongs to?
Linda Muller
40
 

Beginning of Year - Self-Portraits (Lincoln's Masks)

This is a beginning/end of the year self-portrait project created with first graders in mind. Students will create plaster masks to commemorate the start of first grade, that are filled, surrounded and suspended with items that represent who they are. In progress

#NPGteach
Tags: self-identity; community building; Art; family; National Portrait Gallery
Alicia Ronquillo
10
 

Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence

A compare/contrast of Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence, integral figures in the Harlem Renaissance. Created as part of the Learning to Look Summer Teaching Institute at the National Portrait Gallery.

#NPGteach
Inez Koberg
4
 

Symbolism, Story, and Art: Achelous & Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules," a website, and video discussions by curators and educators. The website includes an interactive exploring areas of interest on the piece, as well as lesson and activity ideas for the classroom.

Tags: greece
Tess Porter
6
 

Surrender at Appomattox

This is a lesson designed around the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, in which General Lee Surrendered to General Grant," and is intended to be used when teaching about General Lee's surrender. #npgteach
Jamie Grace
7
 

Paired Portraits

This lesson uses The "see, think, wonder" looking strategies to help students compare portraits on a field trip to the National Portrait Gallery. The lesson includes pre-museum visit activities, museum activities, and a follow up where students will create their own portraits.

This lesson was created in 2016 as part of the "Learning to Look" Teacher Workshop at the National Portrait Gallery. #npgteach
Kristin Enck
7
 

General Robert E. Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Students will observe and analyze the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox C.H., in which Gen. Lee surrendered to Gen. Grant" by Major & Knapp Lithography Co.
#npgteach
Jennifer McGough
6
 

Αλφαβητάρια

A collection of alphabet books to inspire students to create their own. Alphabet books can be created using any subject and completed with any grade. They can be completed individually (one student makes a page for each letter of the alphabet) or as a group or class (each student takes one letter). Here are some ideas for topics or use with your students:
Kindergarden-1st--Pick a letter, write a sentence using that letter and illustrate.
2nd-4th--The class takes a topic such as insects and each student takes a page, researches and illustrates it.
5th-12th--Students take a topic (biography, historical topic, memoir about themselves, book that they've read) and creates an alphabet book with each page telling the story or giving information about the subject.
Met Kous
13
 

Αρχαία παιχνίδια

My first collection of ancient games.
Ourania Doula
7
 

History of Video Games

A look at the factors that influenced video games and gaming.
John Di Maria
18
 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Susan Stokley
66
 

Inventions: The washing machine

This collection follows the development of the washing machine through time.
Chris Campbell
7
 

Holocaust and Art

The artworks in this collection do not necessarily directly reference the Nazi genocide of Jews and other targeted groups. These sculptures, paintings, and photographs date from roughly 1933 onward, and represent a reflection on untimely death (collectively and individually) or a foreboding of turmoil and destruction. Art is one way to begin to comprehend the misery that human beings sometimes inflict upon one another. We cannot completely grasp the impact of that loss and grief; yet images may touch us on a deeper level, and ultimately serve to reinforce a sense of the value of human life and the reality of our shared humanity.
Ken Jassie
10
 

Famous Faces: A collection of portraits by Irving Penn

Irving Penn was one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century. Throughout a career that spanned 70 years, Penn captured images in black and white and color across various genres including advertising, fashion, still life, and portraits.
This Collection features portraits Penn took of famous people who built careers in the arts, an article written about Penn in The Smithsonian Magazine (November, 2015), and a link to the Irving Penn Archives at the Art Institute of Chicago where Penn donated the bulk of his collection in 1995.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Resources in the Irving Penn Archives collections at the Art Institute of Chicago include a series of nude photographs which may be inappropriate for minors to view.
Linda Muller
24
 

Child Labor in America

What would it have been like to be a child working during the period 1830-1930? Why did children have to go to work during this period in America's history?
Resources in this Collection includes paintings, photographs, text-based sources, and a video depicting children working in a variety of industries across America.
Linda Muller
23
 

Harlem Renaissance of the early 1900s

What historical, social, and cultural factors influenced the Harlem Renaissance?
Why did Harlem become the center of African-American arts during the 1920s and 1930s?
Linda Muller
20
 

Cat Collection

This is a fun collection of cats from the Smithsonian Institution along with a photo of my favorite kitty, Lucky.
Linda Muller
18
601-624 of 672 Collections