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Found 792 Collections

 

Who creates identity?

This activity will be used to reinforce close reading and analysis of visual text in either a pop culture unit or an identity unit in AP English Language and Composition. The idea is to examine how iconic popular images can be remixed to create new meaning and conversation about identity. 

The collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#NPGteach

Cheryl Chambliss
10
 

Symbolism and Self-Portraiture Like Kehinde Wiley

After using the "Seven Ways to Look at a Portrait" strategy, students create self-portraits in the style of Kehinde Wiley that incorporates study symbolism, self-identity narrative, and reflection on the poses of traditional American portraiture. This lesson requires access to computer technology, a camera (mobile phone is fine), a green screen background, a green screen phone app or program, and ideally a printer.

Amy Leserman
16
 

"The more you look, the more you see." - Self Portraiture and the Personal Essay - Student Version - (#SAAMTeach)

Text below, from The National Portrait Gallery: "Eye to I: Self Portraits from 1900 to Today."

#SAAMTeach

Drawing from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition explores and thinks critically about how American artists have chosen to portray themselves over the past two centuries. Individuals featured in Eye to I have approached self-portraiture at various points in history, under unique circumstances, and using different tools, but their representations—especially when seen together—all raise important questions about self-perception and self-reflection. Some artists reveal intimate details of their inner lives through self-portraiture, while others use the genre to obfuscate their true selves or invent alter egos. Are we seeing mirror images? Or, are these portrayals refractions of modern identity that reveal artistry rather than personality?

As we are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media, and as we continue to explore the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to our country’s history. 

https://www.si.edu/exhibitions...


Annette Spahr
26
 

Inside Out & Back Again

Resources to accompany a unit on the YA verse novel Inside Out and Back Again by Thhanha Lai. #SAAMteach

Katie Porter
6
 

The Survivors Who Haunt Us: Developing Global Competence by Understanding the Power of Resilience

These materials address a unit on resilience and global competence as related to and extended from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak.  #SAAMteach

Yolanda Toni
13
 

What does it Mean to Be a Scientist?: The Scientific Method and Taking Good Notes

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
9
 

Women and men who helped New York immigrates' living conditions during the 19th and early 20th century.

This collections shows men and women who helped change the living conditions of the immigrants that flooded into New York City during the 19th and 20th centuries. They changed the way people lived by shining a light on the poor living conditions of the newest Americans.  The following people are discussed in this collection: Lillian Wald, Jane Addams, Margaret Sanger, Jacob Riis, and Theodore Roosevelt.  The themes that are discussed are: tenement living, women's health, and immigrants. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019  Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 

#NPGteach


leigh lewis
17
 

Recognizing the American Dream Lesson


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
6
 

Maps as Story: Analyzing Thematic Development Using Visual Maps

Students will "read" and analyze elements such as conflict, symbolism, mood, and tone in order to interpret a visual map's message or story.  

Rosalyn Greene
14
 

The Electronic Superhighway: Perception of American Culture

Is American Culture always perceived in the same way by everyone or does it differ from person to person?

#SAAMteach

Brooke Oxendine
10
 

Identity

English 12 unit 

Focus on "Identity" and transition to "Conformity" and the response of the individual to environmental sources that might seek to suppress individuality

#SAAMteach

Marie Meyer
15
 

Preamble: Unity and Individuality In America Today

This lesson focuses on Mike Wilkins' "Preamble".  The purposes of this lesson is to have students analyze the Preamble to the Constitution (particularly the phrase, "We the People") and discuss its relevance today. 


#SAAMteach

Taleen Hasholian
10
 

Immigration & The Face of American Identity

This collection provides resources that can be used to introduce and discuss the following essential questions, as part of a larger "American Identity" literature-based unit:  

1) In what ways do immigrants change America?

2) What would America be like without immigrants?

3) How do immigrants' experiences contribute to a complex and multifaceted American Identity?

#SAAMteach

Joanna Dickinson
13
 

Immigration and Community: What is Home?

This collection is a teacher resource for ELL populations who are making connections between their homes/communities and housing communities for migrant populations of the past. #SAAMteach.

arteacher
14
 

The Wednesday Wars and the American Ideal

Resources to accompany a unit on the YA novel The Wednesday Wars by Gary Schmidt.

Tip Walker
15
 

Rosa and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

A look at the Montgomery Bus Boycott through Rumbaugh's sculpture of Rosa Parks.  A deep look at the characterization of the three figures through the lens of literary analysis.  Students will use the sculpture as a jumping board into literacy activities.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. 


#NPGteach

Kelly McGuire
23
 

Compare/Contrast: Faith Ringgold and Jacob Lawrence

This collection includes self-portraits by two different artists: Faith Ringgold and Jacob Lawrence.  Both artists are generally known for their efforts to represent everyday life experiences, struggles, and successes of African Americans.  The purpose of the collection is to prompt a discussion comparing/contrasting each artist's content and media choice in the context of a self-portrait.  Students will be asked to reflect on stages of the artistic process in terms of artist intent, choice of media, and general content of a finished artwork.     

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.  #NPGteach 

Liz List
16
 

Perspectives on Japanese-American Internment

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan during World War II, anti-Japanese paranoia increased in many parts of the United States. Many persons of Japanese decent, even those who were American citizens, were suspected of loyalty to Japan. In response to this perceived security risk, in 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the internment of thousands of American citizens of Japanese ancestry and resident aliens from Japan.

This lesson is intended to be used as an extension to the study of the Holocaust in English-Language Arts. Students should have some prior knowledge of World War II, Nazi propaganda and the Jewish experience in concentration camps. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute at the National Portrait Gallery (2019). #NPGTEACH

Tracy Biondi
10
 

Dismissing the Dead White Guy

This collection explores the necessity, logic, and fairness of the inclusion and/or exclusion of people of history based on gender and/or race. 

Lessons include

Looking Using the Puzzle Strategy

Looking using several various strategies. 

Easily customization by simply using as an individual or group lesson or by requiring all, some, or one of the additional group portraits.

Researching People and Inventions

Recognizing Bias and Objective Analysis

Understanding the Difference Between Bias and Prejudice

Argumentative Essay Writing (Designed as a timed writing for AP Lang, but the prompt could easily be turned into a formal writing assignment. 


#NPGteach

Deborah Eades
15
 

Genius as Immigrants

In this collection the students will examine the Time Cover of Albert Einstein and the Time Cover of J. Robert Oppenheimer. As they study the two, students will answer three questions about the two covers: What do you think you know about this portrait? What puzzles you about this portrait? What does this portrait make you want to explore? Students will examine the portrait to determine what they see as similarities in the two men.  Brief biographies of the men will be given to the students after they examine the photography to help students with the puzzling part and a possible springboard into the exploration of the men. After this the students will view the picture of the two men and answer the questions about them. 

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGteach

Shauna Cihacek
3
 

Well Behaved Women Rarely Become Famous

A collection of portraits of women that defied conventions of their day. Portraits chosen for this collection could lead to a discussion on the evolution of feminism in the US.  It includes several learning to look strategies.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2019 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

#npgteach

Kimmel Kozak
23
 

Student Podcasting: Exploring the "Nature of Science" through Podcast Development [TEACHER TEMPLATE-- MAKE A COPY]

[DESCRIBE YOUR STUDENTS' PODCAST TOPIC HERE; INCLUDE ANY IMAGES, NOTES OR DOCUMENTATION ABOUT THEIR PROCESS. 

EXAMPLE (3-4 sentences): Sixth grade students conducted research about our community's access to clean drinking water, electricity, and roads over the past fifty years. Students identified subject matter experts, refined interview questions, conducted interviews and produced the episode included here. This collection includes the completed podcast episode, alongside text and images documenting the students' research and production process.]


This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection includes examples of student-created podcast epsidoes, in response to prompts from the Sidedoor for Educators collections. After listening to Sidedoor podcasts to set context, gain background knowledge from Smithsonian experts, and initiate a local dialogue on the topic, students engaged in community-based scientific research to explore and collect evidence about how this topic and the content within the episode is defined locally.

To find additional student podcast collections, search the Smithsonian Learning Lab for #YAGSidedoor2019.

Ashley Naranjo
4
 

Mini Unit Recognizing the American Dream


#SAAMteach

Maria Ryan
10
 

How Did We Get Here?: Introduction to Flying Machines

This is a  collection designed to introduce students to the history of aviation as told through the lens of the scientific method-design process. Students begin by thinking about why is flight important in our lives, and how did we get to the airplanes we now know? Students look at the many designs that planes have gone through, and discuss why perseverance and problem-solving are important skills to have. They also see that teamwork, cooperation, and a desire to succeed were necessary for the Wright Brothers to do their important work. Feel free to pick and choose from the resources in creating your own collections:


Overall Learning Outcomes:

  • Scientists use trial and error to form conclusions.
  • Scientists test hypotheses using multiple trials in order to get accurate results and form strong conclusions. 
  • Scientists use multiple data and other evidence to  form strong conclusions about a topic.
  • Scientists work together to apply scientific research and knowledge to create new designs that meet human needs. 
  • Scientists help each other persevere through mistakes to learn new ideas.

Guiding Questions for Students to Answer from this collection:

  • Why is flight important?
  • How do scientists solve problems?
  • How do scientists collect data to help them solve problems?



#LearnwithTR

Katherine Dunn
8
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