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Found 6,343 Collections

 

The Art and Science of Color

Name a topic that links science, history, art, and culture. How about color?

Let’s follow the theme of color through the vast collections of the Smithsonian Libraries, and make a few unexpected connections and discoveries.

Most of us take color for granted. We simply see it the moment that light beams from or reflects off an object, enters our eyes, and is processed by our brains. But do we stop to think what color actually is?

Journeying through the collections of the Smithsonian Libraries — from chemistry to catalogs, from colorblind tests to couture — we might see color in a new light.


This Learning Lab is based on the online exhibition, Color in a New Light, curated by Jennifer Cohlman Bracchi, Head Librarian, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. The exhibition can be found here: https://library.si.edu/exhibition/color-in-a-new-light

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
22
 

Photographer: Appel, Annie

#nmahphc

The Annie Appel collection at the NMAH Photographic History Collection consists of forty-two gelatin silver portraits of people who attended various Occupy protests. 

Copyright Anne Appel

NMAH Photographic History Collection
21
 

Photographer: Mather, Margarethe

#nmahphc

The Margarethe Mather NMAH Photographic History Collection consists of five platinum print photographs from the 1920s. Photographer Margrethe Mather was a model and source of inspiration for Edward Weston and an established pictorialist and a pioneering modernist in her own right.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: women photographers, Pictorialism, platinum photography, palladium photography, Pierrot

NMAH Photographic History Collection
3
 

Photographer: Noggle, Anne

#nmahphc

This is a collection of four panorama photographs by photographer Anne Noggle made in the 1960s of a kitchen, a cafe lunch counter, a row of mailboxes, and a neighborhood street corner.  

Keywords: women, aging, panoramic photo, panorama photography, neighborhood, mailboxes


Anne Noggle was born in 1922 in Evanston, IL and spent her formative years living there with her mother and sister—two women who would become important characters in Noggle’s photography. 

Prior to her photography career, Noggle led a markedly different life.  In 1940, with her student pilot license in hand, Anne Noggle became a pilot and eventually a flight instructor as a Women’s Air Force Service Pilot (WASP) in World War II.  At the conclusion of the war, Anne taught flying, joined an aerial circus, and worked as a crop duster.  Art grabbed Noggle’s attention while she was on active duty in the air force in the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Stationed in Paris, she spent much of her free time at the Louvre.  Forced into early retirement due to emphysema caused by crop dusting, Noggle registered for college as an art history major at the University of New Mexico in 1959.  She was thirty-eight years old. 

Anne Noggle’s early photographs utilize the 35mm Panon camera.  Most of these 140° photographs are of an aging woman and her surroundings.  In Janice Zita Grover’s introduction to Silver Lining:  Photographs by Anne Noggle, she writes, about the panoramic format, that it is characteristic “to distort space in such a way that subjects distant from the lens appear flattened against deep space; between this effect and the necessity for reading the image side to side, the format gets as close as the still camera can to the implied narrative unfolding of a panoramic opening shot in a film . Noggle’s Panon images of her mother’s circle in Santa Fe have exactly these qualities, as if a newly landed observer…were scrutinizing these women, their curious rites and settings, for the first time.” 

By the early 1970s, however, Noggle moved on to wide-angle portraits featuring herself, her mother, sister, and her mother’s friends.  It is for these photographs that Noggle is most known.  Her interest in women and the aging process is exemplified by self-portraits of Noggle’s own face-lifts and images of her aging body. 

Noggle has been granted two NEA grants and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Major holdings of Anne Noggle’s work can be found at:  the Northlight Gallery at Arizona State University, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, University of New Mexico—University Art Museum, and the Museum of New Mexico Photographic Archives.  In Washington, DC, American Art has one photograph from Noggle’s Agnes series of two women playing croquet.


NMAH Photographic History Collection
5
 

"what is feminist art?" 2019 responses

Responses from the 2019 questionnaire "What is Feminist Art," as included in a 2019 exhibition of the same name.

Sarah Archino
39
 

Slavery in Brazil

Why was Brazil one of the last countries in the world to abolish slavery?

The idea is to make learners understand the long-lasting slavery process in Brazil and be aware of its consequences to our society.

Supporting Questions: 1) When did it happen and what was the political context?

                                           2) How slaves were treated?

                                           3)Who took advantage of it?   

By these questions leaners will grasp the whole scenario (economical, political, cultural and social) and see that the effects of this process is everywhere and explain social relations we have nowadays.                                     

#TeachingInquiry

Alessandra Zan
6
 

Did American women [or the women of your state] deserve the right to vote in the early 20th century?

Who had the right to vote in the US [or your state] by the early 20th century?; What roles did women play in society at this time?; Who supported and opposed women's suffrage and why?

Though the answer to this compelling question might feel obvious to 21st century Americans, the issue was far from settled at the time. This dichotomy adds to its intellectual heft and engages students' inherent interest in fairness, discrimination, and rights. (It also connects to ongoing debates about the franchise and who is entitled to it.) The supporting questions invite students to learn more about voting in the time period, the changing roles played by women, and the people who might have supported or opposed women's political equality, all of which help scaffold students' investigations into the ideas and issues behind this compelling question.

#TeachingInquiry

Kristen Levithan
6
 

Touch a Falling Star

All about METEORITES

Where to find them, where they come from, what they can tell us, and MORE

Chris Hunt
18
 

Cosmic Survey

Discover some of the features of the Universe: 

Cosmic Glossary

Activities: How Big? How Far? How Old?


Chris Hunt
15
 

Subject: The 1896 Washington Salon & Art Photographic Exhibition

#nmahphc

This collection of photographs was the first purchase of art photography for what is now the Photographic History Collection.

Keywords: Smithsonian history, art photography, pictorialism, pictorialist, Thomas Smillie, exhibition history

Three prestigious Washington, D.C., organizations played a major role in the establishment and acceptance of art photography in America. The Camera Club of the Capital Bicycle Club sponsored the 1896 Washington Salon and Art Photographic Exhibition. The Cosmos Club provided the exhibit space. And fifty of the salon's images were purchased to expand the Smithsonian Institution's national collection.

The online exhibition that explores this exhibition further can be found at https://americanhistory.si.edu/1896/index.htm.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
51
 

Grasshopper - Lesson

  • Compare and Contrast the Eastern Lubber Grasshopper to the Conehead Grasshopper


    • Colors
    • Ability to move
    • Shape and size
  • Explore grasshopper's mouth pieces that are used for grinding 

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
7
 

Ocean

The ocean covers the majority of the Earth and contains so many diverse creatures. Check out some of the objects in the Smithsonian collection related to the ocean.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
74
 

Bison, Zebras, and Kangaroos - Smithsonian Collection

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
44
 

Wind

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
6
 

Flamenco

An introduction to the basics of Flamenco music and dance.

#SmithsonianMusic

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
10
 

Bodies

This collection is comprised of artwork and objects that reflect a variety of bodies and the amazing things bodies can do. 

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
75
 

BabyLegs, 2017-2019

This collection explores BabyLegs, an open-source, affordable monitoring tool to study marine microplastic pollution featured in Nature-- Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
9
 

Ancient Egypt

Explore the vast resources on Ancient Egypt that the Smithsonian has to offer.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
40
 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A look? Explore this collection to see how people, and animals communicate.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
33
 

Spoons

You may think of spoons as everyday objects, but spoons can tell special stories and teach us about cultures. Explore this collection to learn more.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
84
 

Dinosaurs

Explore the vast resources on dinosaurs that the Smithsonian has to offer.

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
42
 

Insects

SI resources for insects.


This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
11
 

Photographer: Rushton, Charles

#nmahphc

Charles Ruston is an American photographer that made portraits of New Mexico-based photographers between the years of 1980 and 1994.  This particular collection consists of thirty-eight prints.  The collection includes photographers Tom Barrows, Van Deren Coke, Betty Hahn, David Michael Kennedy, Patrick Nagatani, Beaumont Newhall, and Joel-Peter Witkin.  The earliest print in this collection is of Manuel Carrillo in 1982, and the last piece added to the collection is of Holly Roberts in 1994. 

Copyright Charles Rushton

Keywords: photographs of photographers, people with cameras
 
Rushton chose this particular project after attending a Zone VI workshop offered by Fred Picker in Vermont in 1980.  While at the workshop Rushton was given specific advice to pick a topic and stick to it instead of switching random topics every day.  This was when Rushton had the idea to photograph artists and photographers upon returning home to New Mexico.  With help of photographer friend, Bob Hooten, Rushton was able to obtain the names of  photographers that suited the parameters of his project.  After a few years Rushton sold some of his prints to the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History for their collection of portraits of New Mexico Artists and expressed interest in seeing his future work.  With the permission of the museum, Rushton used the Albuquerque Museum of Art and History name to help him gain influence and access to more famous photographers such as Beaumont Newhall.  
 
Rushton studied photography under Fred Picker, Oliver Gagliani (depicted in the collection), and Arnold Newman (depicted in the collection).  

NMAH Photographic History Collection
39
5977-6000 of 6,343 Collections