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Found 629 Collections

 

Bracero Program: Unveiling Stories

In this activity, students will examine photographs documenting the Bracero Program, the largest guest-worker program in US history. Started in 1942 as a temporary war measure to address labor demands in agriculture and railroads, the program allowed Mexican nationals to take temporary agricultural work in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, and 24 other states. By the time the program ended in 1964, over 4.6 million contracts were awarded.

Using two Project Zero Global Thinking Routines - "Unveiling Stories" and "The 3 Ys" - students will analyze the stories these photographs tell about the experiences of braceros in this program, and the impact of these stories in multiple contexts. Additional resources (primary sources, a digital exhibition, and an article) and information on how to use these routines in the classroom can by found by clicking Read More ».

Keywords: mexican, immigration, work, migration, migrant workers, agriculture, reform, politics, government, leonard nadel, photojournalism, activity, inquiry strategy, global competency, global competence, latino, chicano, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Arkansas, 1940s, 40s, 1950s, 50s, 1960s, 60s


molly page
37
 

Henry David Thoreau - Resources and “Walden: A Game"

Can a Video Game Capture the Magic of Walden? 

Henry David Thoreau’s

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com...
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Mary Marotta
11
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Unveiling Stories: Children at Work

I created this collection to have my students understand better the role children played in the past. Considering how quickly I have to teach history to my 4th graders I wanted to rely on photographs to help orient the students into time and place. I focused on the late 1800s into the mid-1900s. The students in my class wanted to know more about children's lives during the time period we were learning about. The purpose of the collection is to push the students to think beyond what they immediately see and consider the bigger ideas captured in these photographs.

#goglobal

Students engaged in thinking routines during this activity:

See, Think, Wonder

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Unveiling Stories

  • What is the story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Ellen Rogers
15
 

Civil Rights: One Act - The 1968 Olympics

I created this small collection for my students to consider the roles of each individual in this photograph. When they engaged in the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine many of them wanted to know more about the white man wearing a medal and why he wasn't raising his fist. They generated many additional questions around this idea. I added the ESPN video to help the think more about the photo and its meaning. We had a class discussion that revisited their questions from the day before.

Ellen Rogers
8
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
 

A STEAM Approach to Understanding Bees

Explore bees' behavior and their role in pollination through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections by searching the Learning Lab for #SmithsonianSTEAM.

Keywords: animal, insect, plant adaptation, animal communication, flowers, pollen, honey, hive, engineering, entomologist, pollinator, colony, system


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM

Sandra Vilevac
61
 

Roman Art

The Romans culture included a ton of art. Granted, most of their ideas came from the Greek culture that preceded them. A lot of their art is a play on a Greek original. They dabbled in architecture; building temples, tombs, etc. They built sculptures with materials such as copper and iron. They even had a few writers and poets. This particular collection focuses on the architecture, sculptures and paintings related to their culture. I chose this topic and these segments because I am extremely interested in seeing how art was when it was first coming to fruition, generations ago. It is fascinating to mentally compare it to the art forms we see today. #AHMCFall2019

Britt
18
 

From Medieval to Modernism: The Impact of Classical Art & Architecture

This collection is intended to further educate viewers on the architecture and art in the Classical period using multiple resources as well as the Robert & DiYanni text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

Throughout this collection readers will get a glimpse of the start of Classical architecture and how it came to be, how art lined the walls of these buildings and how art through architecture was developed. With that, readers will be able to engage and visualize today's architectural structures and how that culture influences today compared to those between the Medieval times to Modernism. They will also have the ability to recognize the true and inner beauty that lies in this architecture, amidst the chaos that regularly occurred there on a day to day basis. The truth will always remain beautiful even when it doesn't seem that way.

This collection is available for those wanting to see the beginnings of the classical art and it's influences from the medieval times up until modernism and will provide a better visual understanding that before the beauty of what architecture is today, there was once beauty at the start of it all and that remains throughout the years, just presented in different forms. 


#AHMCFall2019

Candi Tate
15
 

chairs

sketches, designs, prototypes and finished chairs

Louise Brady
22
 

The Progressive Era?

Objective: Students will be able to identify the objectives of the Progressive Movement through primary source analysis in order to evaluate their impact on American society.

Essential Questions: 

  • What were the main objectives of the Progressive Movement?
  • Is 'progressive' an appropriate term to define this era?
Emily Surman
19
 

Artist Trading Cards: Database

In this collection, students will explore  artists from modern and contemporary eras. Students will choose one artist to learn more about using the links provided. Students will research the history in connection with the chosen artist and describe their work. Students will then create 4 trading cards about their chosen artists, with images in the style of the artist. 

Collection includes artwork by the following artists: El Anatsui, Andy Warhol, Dorothea Lange, Monet, Helen Frankenthaler, Mark Rothko, Nick Cave, Yinka Shonibare, Wayne Thiebaud, Mary Cassat, Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Mies van der Rohe, Kehinde Willey, Amy Sherald, Ansel Adams, Ran Hwang, Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze, Rusell Crotty, Jasper Johns, Romare Bearden, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mondrian, Seurat,  Calder, Donald Judd,  Sol Lewitt, and Roy Lichtenstien.

This collection was created for the "Smithsonian Learning Lab, Focus on Global Arts and Humanities" session at the 2019 New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association (NJPSA) Arts Integration Leadership Institute. 

Keywords: art history, trading cards, modern, contemporary,

Rebecca Beaird
135
 

Breaking Barriers: Reconstruction & African American Leaders

This collection is designed to support teachers and students exploring the 2020 National History Day theme: Breaking Barriers in History. Included in this collection is an overview of Reconstruction and three African American leaders aligned with the NHD theme.

These resources - including  photographs, primary source documents, portraits, and articles - explore the efforts of Frederick Douglass, Hiram Revels, and Blance Bruce in overcoming  social, political, and economic barriers throughout the era of Reconstruction following the Civil War. These men were influential African American leaders who exemplified what was possible for newly freed people in the United States and who continue to inspire African American leaders to this day. It also explores the violent backlash to these changes in the political and social spheres of the United States - most notably through the terrorist activity of the Ku Klux Klan. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; rather, it is intended to act as a starting point and provide inspiration for further research. 

#NHD2020

Abigail Burnett
45
 

The Value of a Sketch

A design project’s aesthetics and cultural impact are usually the primary consideration as to the effectiveness and quality of a designer's approach to problem-solving. What is often overlooked in these perspectives are the various preliminary approaches that designers employ—how do we visualize and ultimately share our ideas with others?

Within design education, projects are usually conceived to help expose students to the “design process,” an often-complex journey of experiments and discoveries. This process helps guide students in the creation of future successful design solutions. With the progress of the digital experience (PowerPoint presentations, iPhone apps, and Virtual Reality), the art of the sketch seems to be a casualty of the current state of the design process.

What can we learn from a sketch? Is the sketch a dead art form, forever packed away in folders or archives never to be seen again? Or, can we reevaluate its historical contributions in the design process and creation of artful typographic syntax and hierarchy, image creation, and narrative development?

 Most often, these small, thumbnail sketches speak only to a limited audience (Art Directors, other designers, or only the designer themselves) and, therefore, usually have a limited impact. But, in the hands of a skilled and creative designer, these sketches can mean the difference between success or failure, the green light, or the idea being squashed.

As a supplement to several educational design projects, this collection attempts to expose students to the value of the simple pencil sketch. How can we use the sketching process to encourage young designers to visualize away from the computer and avoid the digital “sameness” pervasive in our visual world?

This collection attempts to chronicle the process of various designers and their projects (both large and small, complex, and simple) and presents their approach to preliminary ideation through the sketching process. The collection includes thumbnails, photographs, color studies, line reductions as well as the completed project in hopes of revealing The Value of a Simple Sketch.

Designers/Artist included:

Willi Kunz, (1943 - )  Swiss-born Kunz, played a significant role in the introduction of the new typography developed from Basel to the United States, where he currently lives and works.

Dan Friedman, (1945–1995) noted American graphic and furniture designer and educator. One of the significant contributors to the New Wave typography movement.

Painter Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) was the leader of the Dutch De Stijl movement, where he implemented an extreme visual vocabulary consisting of planes of primary colors, simplified right angles, and linear accents.

Tom Engeman, (1934 - ), American designer and Illustrator who has designed and illustrated several stamps for the United States Postal Service, including the Flags of Our Nation forever stamps and the 150th Anniversary of the Smithsonian commemorative stamp.

Ned Drew
109
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
 

Native American Beading: Examples, Artist Interview, Demonstration and Printable Instructions for Hands-on Activity

This collection looks at examples of bead work among Native American women, in particular Kiowa artist Teri Greeves, and helps students to consider these works as both expressions of the individual artist and expressions of a cultural tradition.

The collection includes work samples and resources, an interview with Ms. Greeves, demonstration video of how to make a Daisy Chain bracelet, and printable instructions.

Naomi Manzella
6
 

Lessons in the Language of the Suffrage

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

19th Amendment: 

Women’s Right to Vote

Passed by Congress June 4, 1919. Ratified August 18, 1920

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.


__________________________________________________________________________________________________

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. 

The suffrage movement of the mid-nineteenth century, recognized today as the first wave of “feminism,” continues to influence and inspire the ongoing struggle for women’s rights. Many of the methods and strategies of our early pioneers serve not only as inspiration, but, as a model for effective communication that is still relevant today. 

“Man was given an eye for an ear.” 
  — Marshall McLuhan, The Medium is the Massage

The pioneers of the suffrage understood the power of the visual message. Their use of color, branded collateral, such as badges, banners, ribbons, and the promotion of their political messages, through the traditional means of posters and postcards, drew attention and created a precedent for protesting copied around the world by other political movements, including today. 

These pioneering women used simple language and ‘conversations’ in an attempt to educate people about the injustices of the legal system. These messages were often hand generated in a vernacular manner. The poster, in particular, proved informative, accessible, and an effective medium for the dramatization of a specific point of view. 

This collection serves as a brief visual research of language and methods of communication of the suffrage. Through a formal and conceptual investigation of hierarchy and composition using the timely messages of the suffrage, students will explore the process and historical method of poster making, the letterpress printing process. 


_________________________________________________________________________________________________

DESCRIPTION/PURPOSE: 

Students will explore the vocabulary of the Women’s Voting Rights Movement through a series of typographic letterpressed permutations. Students will identify and explore themes that are different, as well as those that have remained the same for any disenfranchised individuals in the United States. 

Each student is to choose one of the quotes provided in the presentation or find a relevant quote of the time. This will serve as the content for the typographic studies. Depending on the students’ concept for the poster, additional research and text may be required. 


_________________________________________________________________________________________________

PHASE 1: Typographic Interpretations

Design a poster representing one of the historic statements of the suffrage. Your poster can remind people of the amendment’s original purpose and importance and/or raise awareness about a particular issue related to the amendment. There are plenty of high profile issues in the news now that directly relate this amendment. Your audience is college students.

“ All typefaces serve fundamentally the same purpose: to communicate. The purpose behind the communication –
  for 
example, to inform, to entertain, or to persuade – is expressed, in part, by the typeface chosen. As the
  communication 
objectives change, so might the typeface.”   – Willi Kunz


Typographic Process and Checklist

1      review content – reading/understanding.

2      search for inherent structure/patterns/rhythms within the text.

3      develop preliminary plans for hierarchical structures.

4      sketches – create quick but meaningful “road maps” of your thoughts.

5      develop concepts of “center and support” configurations.  

6      construct preliminary, secondary & tertiary alignments.

7      form constellations that house sub-thoughts within the text (grouping info.).

8      consider/reconsider overall composition while thinking about “activating the edge.”

9      play against the viewer’s expectations.

10    legibility (clarity and efficiency in reading) vs. readability (pleasure and interest in reading)– Willi Kunz 


_________________________________________________________________________________________________

PHASE 2: Type & Image Interpretations

Learning Objectives:

+ Integrate text + image using the four methods described in the book Type, Image, Message by Skolos + Wedell
+ Recognize the design opportunities that come with using type as an image


Type, Image, Message by Skolos + Wedell
Separation, Fusion, Fragmentation & Inversion

Separation – when the type & image operate independently. Reinforce messages. Type spaces & image spaces.

Fusion – when the type and image blend to form a unit. Type & image connected by perspective—blend 2 plus things that aren’t usually associated. Conceptually connected. Political or poetic statement. Metaphor

Fragmentation – when the type & image disturb or disrupt each other. Torn, divided, uneven, disparate. Scale, color, complication. Unpredictable, random, animated, energized message.

Inversion – form of fusion when type & image trade places & the type takes on pictorial properties or the image takes on type qualities. Harmonious. Type as photo, or hyper-realistic. Letters as frames for images.


__________________________________________________________________________________________________

DELIVERABLES

• Two 14 by 17 inch letterpressed posters. One typographic solution. One type and image solution.
• Printed in 2- 3 color
• Quote selected must be included (but does not need to be the primary read)


__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Brenda McManus
Assistant Professor  | Art Department | Pace University-NYC   

Co-Founder
BRED | a collaborative design lab
www.brednation.com
Instagram: bred_letterpress


 

Brenda McManus
96
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This is a project for my online US history class. Which is about certain artifacts in the 1920s-30s.

ally northrup
10
 

Jamestown See Think Wonder

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Debbie Tannenbaum
9
 

DRAFT Grade 4 Beliefs Unit - Science, Art, Humanities and Engineering - Museums Go Global

Welcome to the Grade 4 Beliefs Unit Collection. Please enjoy. Below there is information about:

- How the lesson was used specifically at Washington International School (WIS) in Washington DC in 2019 
- The role of STEAM at WIS

Additionally, within the collection, the markers will help guide the teacher through each component. The collection is broken up into: Educating the teacher team (preparing for the unit), STEAM teacher resources, Student activities, and Student learning extensions. 

Enjoy and all feedback is welcomed. 

About: 

Washington International School is an International Baccalaureate (IB), Primary Years Program (PYP). I am the STEAM Specialist who integrates 21st century skill inquiry projects, hands on science and engineering, and digital tools/technology. This collection is to support many teachers who will contribute to content for this unit. The Language specialists, art teacher, design technology, STEAM Specialist and physical education.

STEAM at WIS:

My role will be to host an experience that role-plays early civilizations and their interactions with sun, moon, and stars. Students will interpret their experience and create a piece of art that demonstrates their translation of the experience. The follow up will be to help the students connect their experience with ancient cultures. Then, the conversation will further develop to challenge the students to think how science changes our understanding of our universe. The overall theme is to encourage students and give them confidence to explore various belief systems, challenge their own understanding of the world through their beliefs, experiences, and science. 

These exercises scaffold learning to align student inquiry to the Social Studies standards: 

  • Distinguish between personal beliefs and belief systems (PYP Scope and Sequence Pg. 29)
  • Define the elements of a belief system (creed, codes of behavior, rituals, community.) (AERO CC+ G5 p22 4.5.f)
  • Identify the major religions of the world in terms of their beliefs, rituals and sacred texts. (referenced: AERO CC+ G6 p30 4.8.f)
  • Reflect upon how beliefs affect the individual and society (PYP Scope and Sequence Pg. 29)

Important to know: The teachers at WIS took the students on two days of field trips to visit various areas of "worship" in the DC/MD/VA area: Buddhist Temple, Mosque, Jewish Temple, Catholic Church, and African American Christian Church. Students had worksheets to complete for each location that included observations of icons, the use of shapes in the visual devotional symbols, and to draw the various religious icons. After, they engaged in discussion about their experiences. If your school does not have the ability to do an elaborate field trip like this, we recommend having devotional leaders and/or parents visit as subject matter experts to demonstrate their systems of faith, icons, devotions, and symbols. 


STEAM Project: 

  • I used this collection to train the teachers about the new thinking routines (Beginning slides)
  • There are samples from students learning about Sun, Egyptian use of sun in their beliefs (art and architecture) 
  • Students looked at Egyptian sun use and modern NASA sun data to inspire them for their STEAM Challenge
  • Their STEAM Challenge was to create a pyramid (cardboard) with a devotion (clay), and decorate with sun symbols (crayons/markers). 
  •  Our students just completed a cardboard challenge (Cain's Arcade - check out on Youtube) so they were cardboard construction "experts". Therefore, they only had 40 minutes for their challenge. You will need to either have a lesson on cardboard construction before, or give them more samples and/or time. Hypothetically, this could be a 1/2 day project for students. 
  • The goal is then for students to look at other cultures and other NASA data (Incas (or other Native American tribes)  African Tribes, and/or Australian Aborigines, etc. and have them do the same STEAM challenge (format) by creating a model structure decorated by symbols inspired by both indigenous symbols and modern NASA data (sun, stars, planets, or Earth's Moon). Therefore, they will have a "Maker Collection" that demonstrates various engineering styles as well as belief systems. 


International Baccalaureate Transdisciplinary Unit of Inquiry:  Who we are.  Beliefs - An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships, including families, friends, communities and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human. 

Central Idea: Humans have common beliefs that attempt to answer life’s big questions. 

            - The main line of Inquiry this collection will align with is: Global religious beliefs and practices

The following subject teachers plan to do the following:

           - Art = Beliefs and metaphors with clay

           - Digital Technology = Building sacred structures 

           - STEAM = Engineering and Science of sacred structures globally and historically

Global thinking routines: Step In, Step Out, Step Back; Beauty and Truth; Unveiling Stories

STEAM Challenge:  Students can further their inquiry from ancient beliefs with their experiences with modern organized religion into modern spirituality by analyzing the exhibition for Burning Man Festival. Students will complete a STEAM Challenge to build their own sacred structure that honors their own belief systems. 

#GoGlobal 

Sandra Vilevac
82
 

introduction to A Doll's House

This collection will be used for a gallery walk, to introduce students to some of the big ideas in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House.

Theresa Doerfler
6
 

Designing Alternative Energy Solutions

Climate change is a huge issue facing our society. Our students have expressed tremendous concerns about the global impact of the climate crisis.

As part of this learning lab, student teams are tasked with designing and prototyping an alternative energy solution for NYC.

Before embarking on their own designs, students will use the resources to learn about earlier climate campaigns, what scientists and engineers are doing today and will explore models, prototypes and solutions that are already existent.

sara gottlieb
28
 

Dolores del Rio

Dolores del Rio was a Mexican born film actress who stared in many Hollywood films beginning in the 1920's. She was one of the first Latin American movies stars in Hollywood and was renowned for her skill and beauty. She began her career in the silent films of the 1920's and 1930's and successfully adapted to the talking films of later decades. This collection asks the student to consider the significance of her role as an early icon of biculturalism and complete an exercise in perspective taking. 

Information adapted from The New York Times obituary on Dolores del Rio, April 13, 1983. Retreived from https://www.nytimes.com/1983/04/13/obituaries/dolores-del-rio-77-is-dead-film-star-in-us-and-mexico.html

#ethnicstudies 

Meredith Woolard
10
 

Representational, Abstract, or Nonrepresentational?

Introductory Activity: Print image cards for small group collaboration. Students will sort images into three categories:

  1. Representational Art (realistic imagery)
  2. Abstract Art (recognizable imagery that does not reflect actual appearance)
  3. Nonrepresentational Art (does not represent a depiction of the physical appearance of people or objects)

Formal Analysis Activity: 

Choose a few images to compare and contrast: How did the artist use line, shape, color, balance, repetition, or overall composition to convey

  1. The illusion of movement or rhythm
  2. Visual tension
  3. A mood or feeling


Jean-Marie Galing
25
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