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Found 6,415 Collections

 

Victoria Van Meter 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The project is about creating a collection of artifacts that where relevant in the 1920s and 1930s.

victoria van meter
10
 

Victorian Era

This Focus on Music in the Victorian Era, in order to see change and Continuity into the Jazz Era 

Taylor Pearson
22
 

Victory Mail

pacific_avation_museum_edu
8
 

Video

#CIEDigitialStoryTelling.
OSMAR CHACON
1
 

Video Resources in American Sign Language: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, How cool new words are added to American Sign Language. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here.


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Vietnam and The Things They Carried

Images of Vietnam 

Assignment: Choose an image and write a story using vivid imagery and character voice.

Anne Ruka
10
 

Vietnam and Vietcong war

kane mcluckie
1
 

Vietnam causes

Shane Copeland
0
 

Vietnam Soldiers' Experience

Jason Janezic
17
 

Vietnam war

delaney lyons
9
 

Vietnam War for novel The Things They Carried

This collection has images of the Vietnam War to background the novel The Things They Carried.     This collection should help to answer the compelling question; was the Vietnam War justified?

#TeachingInquiry

June Bohr
5
 

Vietnam War Virtual Museum

Students will collaborate in partners to look closely at a series of images from the Vietnam War. Then, each partner group will choose one picture to apply the "See, Think, Wonder" thinking routine (from Harvard's Project Zero).
Michelle Moses
8
 

Vietnam! Boom!

This is the hardest collection to ever see the Smithsonian Learning Lab. Get ready to be schooled on the biggest upset in history..The Vietnam War. Oh yeah!

Davis Deasy
4
 

Views of War

War as glorious vs. war as tragic

Ginger Jantz
48
 

Views on foreigners during the Edo Period - Intro Lesson

This lesson serves as an introduction to the Edo Period in Japan. The module is centered around the artwork "Southern Barbarians," a folding screen painting depicting the arrival of Portuguese traders to a Japanese port, a common scene previous to the Sakoku (closed country) period. After a close analysis of the folding screen, students contrast the scene depicted in the artwork with the proscriptions of the Sakoku edict of 1635 and the Portuguese exclusion edict of 1639. The stark contrast between these two trade scenarios will help students understand the nuance of the political and economic situation of Edo Japan. Additionally, transitioning from a scene where international trade is robust and ordinary, to the drafting of these two edicts severely curtailing this very trade, will lead students to inquire into the extent, as well as the limitations of the closed country period. 


Lesson plan (1 - 2 hours) 

1. "Southern Barbarians" illustrates and extends understanding of the ‘Nanbanjin’ as well as Nanban trade previous to Edo Japan. 'Nanbanjin' referred to Southern European, usually Spanish and Portuguese. The teacher will explain the main traits of Nanban art in order to elucidate further details of the artwork other than the ones that the students observe during the routine. 

For further reference on Nanban Art, read pages 71-142 of the book referenced here. The text contains multiple other examples of folding screens from the period.

See: 

Weston, Victoria. Portugal, Jesuits and Japan: Spiritual Beliefs and Earthly Goods. Chestnut Hill, MA: McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, 2013. Print.

Link to online copy: https://archive.org/details/portugaljesuitsj00west 

2. Class completes a 'See, Think, Wonder' routine with the resource "Southern Barbarians in Japan." The artwork is full of details (such as the man carrying fabric from another Asian port because the Portuguese served as relay traders in the region). This routine might take 30 minutes or more to complete for this reason. 

As part of a World History class, the teacher could highlight these historic "easter eggs" in the artwork and tie in other topics from class such as cotton and silk trade, slavery, navigation technology, missionaries in the East or the Portuguese empire and extension among other subjects present in the folding screen.  

While at first, the Project Zero routines will help to understand the period, the actors and the reasons for drafting the two edicts, the teacher should also emphasize at the end of the routine why this type of art existed and how Japanese viewed Nanban trade. The purpose is to begin the discussion of Edo Japan with an understanding of the complex world of foreign relations, cultural forces and international commerce at the time.  

3. Following this analysis, students perform a close reading and discussion of the edicts of 1635 and 1639. The Project Zero routine 'Explanation Game' should help guide the reading of the edicts. Students first read the edicts on their own, clarify obtuse language, and highlight a few proscriptions that they believe define the Sakoku period. Following this, students complete the 'Explanation Game' routine in small groups. 

4. At the end of this introductory lesson, the teacher leads a group discussion on the edicts, establishing the main proscriptions and political reasons to ban the Portuguese traders. Teacher should clarify the political and social situation of Japan at the time, the presence of the Spanish and Portuguese traders in neighboring countries and the expansion of their respective empires. If class will continue exploring the nuances of the Edo Period, then the teacher could also briefly explain the difference in operations between the Dutch traders and the Portuguese traders. 


Additional resources

Mini-lesson plan (30 minutes)

The remaining resources in this collection allow to further explore the other foreigners in Edo Japan in order to nuance the discussion of international trade and foreign relations during the period. Smaller groups of 3-5 students can analyze separately various ukiyo-e of foreigners, while completing a 'Question Starts' visible thinking routine and discussing their findings at the end of class period with their classmates. 

Denise Rodriguez
11
 

Vikings--Myths and Mysteries

The Vikings have inspired many artists, writers, and filmmakers with their bravery and unique way of life. However, many misconceptions have developed and many facts are still unknown. In this collection, students will explore the website for the Vikings exhibit while taking notes on the included worksheet. Then, they'll evaluate three works of art (and a team logo) based on the Vikings to gauge how accurately they represent Viking life. Finally, they will be asked to create their own 2-D or 3-D object representing Viking life.

Tags: Norse, inquiry, Viking, Norway, Greenland, Iceland

Amy Kennedy
7
 

Vikings--Myths and Mysteries

The Vikings have inspired many artists, writers, and filmmakers with their bravery and unique way of life. However, many misconceptions have developed and many facts are still unknown. In this collection, students will explore the website for the Vikings exhibit while taking notes on the included worksheet. Then, they'll evaluate three works of art (and a team logo) based on the Vikings to gauge how accurately they represent Viking life. Finally, they will be asked to create their own 2-D or 3-D object representing Viking life.

Tags: Norse, inquiry, Viking, Norway, Greenland, Iceland

Kate Harris
7
 

Vincent Stamerra P.5 : Segregation in the U.S

seg·re·ga·tion (noun) is the enforced separation of different racial groups in a country, community, or establishment. Segregation is one of the many main roots of racism . Today, we have no laws or practices of segregation in our government. But not even 100 years ago many people of different skin color (Black, Native, Asian, Indian, etc ..) were separated by the government from all whites . After the Civil War in 1865 slavery ended, causing any human being from being held captive from another human to be free (by law). But that didn't mean to treat those people any different (most slaves were africans). In 1896 laws were put out to legalize segregation in the U.S. This caused people from other color except white to be separated by them. They were all equal, but just separated to keep the white man or female happy. After 68 years of this law it was put down over many years of protests and anger by all color. This revolution was called the Civil Rights Act which was fought for mainly in the 1950 to 1960's. With the laws of segregation out of the way, that didn't cause people to treat African Americans any different. Many people to this day still disrespect other people just because of there skin color. This is because of segregation brainwashing many people , making others to lead the tradition of hating over one another instead of celebrating the act. Segregation is still shown today in mild volumes, with police discrimination of black communities and low tax and income within poor communities filled with mostly blacks. This makes African Americans feel trapped within there own mind , with people saying "Well there's no more laws who cares?" but even with that law being put aside the memory of segregation still lives, causing racism .

Vincent Stamerra
3
 

Virginia History Told Through Stamps

Significant persons and events from Virginia History are told through U.S. Stamps.  Discover the history of the Old Dominion.

Nancy Butler
24
 

Virginia History Tour

From Jamestown to the present, explore some of the people, places and events that tell the story of the history of Virginia. 

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Nancy Butler
56
 

Virtual Field Trip: New York City

Join us as we explore New York City's history, art, and culture!

Calvin Coolidge
27
 

Virtual Reality

draft collection
L R Everitt
2
 

virtual to a nother level

This collection is about the artist Adam Szymczyk's beautiful display that recently was released.

Keilah Fagan
1
 

Virtual Tours

A tour of six different ecosystems.

Randi Miller
3
5881-5904 of 6,415 Collections