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Found 6,338 Collections

 

American Democracy

In conjunction with the Smithsonian Institutions Traveling Exhibition Services - American Democracy: A Great Leap of Faith exhibition

More than just waging a war of independence, American revolutionaries took a great leap of faith and established a new government based on the sovereignty of the people. It was truly a radical idea that entrusted the power of the nation not in a monarchy but in its citizens. Each generation since continues to question how to form "a more perfect union" around this radical idea.

Emma Garten
66
 

American Culture Changed by Basketball

Example collection of the impact basketball has played on development of culture in America.

James Klipa
22
 

American Constitution

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5
 

American Colonies and Native Americans Musical Hobbies

During the colonial era in the United States, American Colonists and Native Americans, worked every single day if it is either with agriculture or as a merchant.   

Not only did people worked hard every day in their lives in America, they also had fun in many ways. Music is one of the many ways they enjoyed their past time. Colonists and Native Americans alike had their own ways in playing music.

Native Americans where the first people to inhabit the United States. They have done many things like constructing their tribes, going to war with other tribes, hunt, and help grow their agricultural lands. There are also ways they enjoyed their past times, for example music. In the artifacts of this collection show how Native Americans interacted with their environment, the type of instruments they used to play music, and how they played music.

Colonists, like Native Americans, also had to work. Some colonists were indentured servants working for many years to pay off their debt to someone.  Other colonists were farmers merchants, plantation owners, or blacksmiths. Each had to work hard for them and their family, but they enjoyed music in their free time. The artifacts in the collection shows the type of instruments they used, which are different form what the Native Americans use, and musical pieces they might have played at that time.

Yailin Pena-Martinez
12
 

american civil war history project

This collection is of a group of key points and "collections" of what made up the civil war.

Ashley Walker
10
 

American Civil War Battle of Gettysburg Historic Photo Analysis

Using the photos in this collection, students will work to answer analysis questions about the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg. Some of the photos in this collection are 3D. Students can use the the blue and red 3D glasses to see the images as they were meant to be viewed in the 1860's.  

Thomas Gray
29
 

American Children's Relics of 1700-1800s

This collection showcases furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. that represent the American children of the 1700-1800s. This period exhibits the transition time between being considered a 2nd class citizen living in a British colony to learning what it means to be an American. The American Revolution lasted from 1775 to 1783 ultimately ending in a victory for the patriots. With the war won and independence gained, America took her first steps into a journey of discovery. 

The first object in this collection starts from the beginning (or a little before) the Revolution and the last items is documented around 1859, well into American culture growing and forming into it's own. Specifically, the items here focus on the lives of the children of this historic moment that may not even understand the revolution going on around them. The objects reflect British influence and American pioneering. These relic grasp the material culture of the first generation of children that were born "Americans."

Heidi Chong
11
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Linda Muller
17
 

American Bald Eagle

How did the bald eagle become the symbol of America? What symbolism did Native Americans find in the bald eagle?
This Collection of resources on the American bald eagle includes images, videos, sculptures, and stamps that depict the American bald eagle.
Bill Lofink
18
 

American Authors and Innovation

Choose one of the American authors in this collection. Research the author and read some of his or her writings. Write a short persuasive essay arguing whether or not this author was innovative and if so how. Discuss whether or not innovation is important in determining the strength of a writer's work.

Analyze the portrait of your author using the portrait handout. Does the portrait capture the qualities that made this author innovative? If not, how would you change the portrait to capture these qualities?
Stephanie Norby
48
 

American Author Research Paper

Introduction to American Author Research Paper. #sj2019lp

Eric Contreras
46
 

American Art to discover American Identity

Choose an art work and complete the Claim-Support-Question thinking routine.  Consider how the artwork expresses the American experience.  

  1. Make a claim about the artwork and what you think it expresses about the American Experience.
  2. Identify support (from the art work) for your claim.
  3. Ask a question related to your claim. (Write it down to ask to the class).  This will facilitate discussion when you present your thoughts about this art to the class.


Angie Taggart
24
 

American Art during the 1700s- early 1800s

During the 1700s to early 1800s, art was an important form of expression. It show cased whether a person had money and notoriety or if they were part of the lower class. People's egos were very much important. Everyone wanted to be a part of the upper class. They would pay an absurd amount of money to have a portrait done of them. Paintings also progressed from being disproportionate portraits to very intricate depictions of mythological creatures and fancy ceramics in a short amount of years. Many of these pieces are still in good shape today, telling us a lot about this time period.

Alisa Nguyen
10
 

American Art

In American history, art was an important aspect of everyday life for the colonists. Their expressions of art came in many forms such as sculptures, paintings, dishes, quilts and metalwork. As showcased on some the collections, they used this artwork to express their views on certain problems they were faced with such as the Stamp Act teapot. For other pieces of artwork it was a way to show off wealth. The dishes and portraits in the collection displayed a form of wealth to colonists in this period of time. Today, arts displayed in homes are still shown as a form of wealth. Although modern art is much different than those shown in this collection, these various forms of art have influenced the art we create today.

Maci Sims
10
 

American Art

In American history, art was an important aspect of everyday life for the colonists. Their expressions of art came in many forms such as sculptures, paintings, dishes, quilts and metalwork. As showcased on some the collections, they used this artwork to express their views on certain problems they were faced with such as the Stamp Act teapot. For other pieces of artwork it was a way to show off wealth. The dishes and portraits in the collection displayed a form of wealth to colonists in this period of time. Today, arts displayed in homes are still shown as a form of wealth. Although modern art is much different than those shown in this collection, these various forms of art have influenced the art we create today.

Maci Sims
10
 

American Abolitionists

This collection is adapted from a collection created by Tess Porter - National History Day: Abolitionists.

In support of research related to American abolitionists, resources - including portraits, articles, primary source documents, videos, and websites - highlight four abolitionists profiled in American Experience film The Abolitionists and the National Youth Summit on Abolition: William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Brown. Additional resources related to abolitionism and other important abolitionists are located at the end. Refer to each collection tile for summaries of individual resources.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

Justine Thain
58
 

America's Presidents

How has presidential portraiture changed since the days of George Washington? The National Portrait Gallery is proud to hold the only complete collection of presidential portraits outside of the White House. This program introduces students to the “America’s Presidents” exhibition and investigates the diverse ways in which presidents have been portrayed in portraiture over the past two centuries.

#NPGteach

Briana White
17
 

America the Beautiful

This lesson makes an important connection to novel The Westing Game which uses clues from the lyrics of "America the Beautiful."

As students read, they will discover that certain clues from the novel make up the lyrics from "America the Beautiful." Students can analyze the lyrics by looking at locations that served as source of inspiration for the original poem by Katherine Lee Bates.  They can fill out the attached worksheet as they "travel" through Bates's journey across the country which served as her inspiration.

Student can then do a Think / Puzzle / Explore with "Electronic Superhighway" by Nam Jun Paik. They can discuss what served as inspiration for this artist's depiction of the United States. They can make connections between Paik and Bates. What did their creations say about the country? What is similar or different about their work or interpretations?

The artwork can then serve as a catalyst for student creative writing. Students will write their own short stories as if the artwork is a time/travel warp to the depictions of whatever state(s) they choose to visit.

Overall, students will examine the vast beauty of the United States through a variety of information.

Yolanda Toni
9
 

America support for the French in World War 2 #TeachingInquiry

This collection focuses on the time when America joined with the Allies to defeat Germany in World War 2. 

My compelling question is: What impact did the arrival of the Americans have in the occupied villages in France in World War 2?

Ros Mattner
8
 

America is in the Heart

Carlos Bulosan’s classic words exploring the immigrant experience in America, read by Hasan Minhaj, Ivy Quicho & Junot Díaz.

#APA2018

Sarah Froonjian
31
 

America in the 1960's

To be used to delve into setting for S.E. Hinton's "The Outsiders."

Sarah Parham-Giannitti
15
 

America and The Holocaust

While Americans were consumed by the task of declaring war and mobilizing for World War II, millions of European Jews were being transported to camps and slaughtered in what would later be known as the Holocaust. This collection focuses on the period leading up to and during the Holocaust, and analyzes the different types of American responses. More specifically, this collection views the two ends of the spectrum. It will include the anti-semitic movements, who advocated against helping Jewish people abroad, and the Jewish Organizations advocating for action to be taken to help the European Jews. Both of these views had powerful advocates and followers among the United States public. These ideas made their way into people's opinions of the government, as well as their policies. Proponents of both sides utilized different forms of media to portray their message and find varying degrees of success.

Payton Angus
16
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection serves as an exploration of America’s direct involvement in the Holocaust. Through the use of American propaganda, stories of the rescue and liberation of Jewish people in Europe, and images of remembrance and memorial, this exhibit intends to shed light on the bleak but often romanticized narrative that is the United States’ response to the Holocaust. The exhibit focuses on America’s role in helping to stop the Holocaust, or at certain points their lack thereof, though the nation’s contributions to the situation through their belief systems, actions, and policies. The exhibit seeks to explore the contrast of anti-Semitism in American citizens and those who fought to free the victims of anti-Semitism in Europe, in addition to However, what is drawn from this idea is what we remember in our collective memory. While remembering those who suffered, as well as those who rescued the suffering, the United States must not dismiss the prevalence of anti-Semitism in America at the time of the mass genocide, whether it was in the form of anti-Jewish rallies or in the form of legislation.

sarah afromsky
16
 

America and the Holocaust

This collection will take a deeper look into anti semitism in America juxtaposed to the upstanders who fought back.  By looking at the Holocaust in American society through this dual lense, it illustrates the two extremes in the society.  Bitter and severe hatred was seen on one side as anti semitsm was fueled by racist and elitist attitudes.  But this does not tell the whole story; many efforts were taken by Americans, specifically the Jewish American community, to raise awareness for the cause and in many instances take active steps to help those suffering in Europe.

Allie Doyle
17
5833-5856 of 6,338 Collections