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Found 6,091 Collections

 

Pittsburgh 1932

This is a collection of images and documents that give historical context for the poem "Pittsburgh 1932." The poem itself tracks a city's changing economic landscape during war years and the Great Depression.

Students can use this collection directly to explore the literature and history.
Kate Harris
25
 

Student Activity: Music as an Environmental Advocacy Approach

In this student activity, explore five musical artists and their connections to environmental advocacy as shared by a Smithsonian Folkways archivist. Inspired by these songs about water issues, you will write lyrics for a song on an environmental theme, incorporating relevant words and imagery.

#SmithsonianMusic

Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Student Activity: Investigating Invasive Species

An invasive species is a plant or animal that has been introduced to an ecosystem and does great damage to its new home. In this activity, students will look at the impact of invasive species on marine ecosystems. Using a global database, students will identify the spread of invasive species. Students will go on to create a  public-service announcement to tell others what they can do to help solve the problem in their local water sources.

Ashley Naranjo
16
 

American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges

This collection features the Smithsonian website “American Indian Responses to Environmental Challenges” which includes videos, personal accounts, and discussions of strategies for maintaining water resources. It also includes an archived webinar featuring Smithsonian experts and case studies of specific nations including the Campo Kumeyaay Nation, the Leech Lake Ojibwe, and the Lummi Nation, as well as the environmental challenges they face. A Smithsonian Magazine article provides further information about a real-world challenge that the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe are experiencing today.
Ashley Naranjo
4
 

Proud Publisher: Heritage Bookmaking Activity

The Smithsonian has joined with book artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a series of easy-to-do book projects designed to get families talking and creating together. In the "Today I am Here" storybook, students explore their heritage by identifying a person, place, and object to tell the story of their own personal history. Included here is a video demonstration and accompanying downloadable instructions to make your own “Today I am Here” storybook!
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Strong Vincent

Civil war officer at Gettysburg
Arthur Glaser
18
 

Spanish Exploration of the Americas

Research the Spanish explorers pictured in this Collection.
Put them in chronological order.
Answer the following questions:
1. What regions did they explore?
2. What did they discover?
Linda Muller
9
 

Investigating Civil War Uniforms

This topical collection includes resources related to Civil War uniforms.  Investigating these Union and Confederate uniforms - through types, differences, and similarities - helps to understand the different human resources of the Union and Confederacy, as well as the experience of individuals who fought in the Civil War. 

Collection contains two lesson plans (both of which can be adapted using resources in this collection), articles of clothing worn by Union and Confederate soldiers, lithographs, photographs, articles, a website, and a symposium.

Keyword: Zouave

Tess Porter
58
 

George Washington & The Culper Spy Ring

Learn about the important role that espionage played during the Revolutionary War and George Washington’s role as one of our nation's first spymasters.
Jourdan Englert
19
 

Investigating a Place: Pennsylvania

This Collection contains stamps, photographs, drawings, sculpture, objects, videos, and music to explore the history and culture of Pennsylvania, the Keystone State. These resources can be used by students to investigate the following questions: How do you define Pennsylvania as a place? What does it mean to be from the Keystone State?
Linda Muller
42
 

Visual Thinking Strategies

The goal of teaching visual thinking strategies is to encourage students to observe independently and back up their responses with evidence.
Annotations for each image contain key questions to help students practice visual thinking.
Linda Muller
5
 

Bill of Rights/Civil Liberties

A collection of resources that represent the amendments that make up the Bill of Rights.
Resource representations as they relate to the Bill of Rights or Civil Liberties are as follows:
1. Bill of Rights
2. Freedom of Religion
3. Freedom of Speech
4. Freedom of the press
5. Right to assemble
6. Have a militia
7. Right to bear arms
8. Soldier's quartering in private homes
9. Illegal search and seizure
10. Right to due process
11. Right not to testify against yourself in court
12. Right to a speedy trial
13. Right to counsel
14. Cruel and unusual punishment
15. Emancipation proclaimation
16. Election of government representation (Congress)
17. Right for all free men including blacks to vote
18. Right of the government to collect taxes
19. Prohibition
20. Women's right to vote
21. Repeal of prohibition
22. Gay rights
23. American's with Disabilities Act
mrsjoyce
20
 

Martin Luther King

This Collection of resources highlights key events in the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It includes resources that illustrate the Montgomery bus boycott, his Letter from a Birmingham Jail, the March on Washington and his I Have A Dream speech and finally, images and a video from his assassination and funeral.

Key Terms:
Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights leader
Activist
Black rights
African American rights
Equality
Linda Muller
22
 

Practice Reading Portraits--Black History Month

This collection was created for a brief warm-up activity where students practiced analyzing portraits of recognizable figures as a group, prior to working on their own portrait analysis. Portraits of Muhammad Ali, Serena Williams, Rosa Parks, and Booker T. Washington are included and they vary in detail and medium.

The last resource, a PDF file, is a teacher's guide created by the National Portrait Gallery. Teachers should lead discussion about the portraits using suggested questions in the guide, and then let students search for a portrait of someone of their own choosing to analyze.

tags: civil rights, sports, tennis, boxing, African-American, black history, analysis, comparison

Kate Harris
6
 

dance inspired

Stephanie Norby
10
 

dance videos

Stephanie Norby
43
 

Dance

Stephanie Norby
98
 

Tale of a Whale and Why It Can Be Told

Multi-step lesson in which students do the work of scientists who study the endangered North Atlantic right whale. They compare photos to identify an individual whale and use a record of sighting to track this whale’s movements along the eastern seaboard.
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
10
 

Prehistoric Climate Change and Why It Matters Today

In a lesson in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, students do the work of a team of paleontologists studying a time of rising carbon dioxide and rapid global warming during the Eocene epoch. By examining fossils of tree leaves, and then incorporating the findings into a mathematical formula, they are able to tell average annual temperatures 55 million years ago. Really!

Click the PDF icons to download the issue and additional materials.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
9
 

What's Your Problem? A Look at the Environment in Your Own Backyard

Students take on a local environmental challenge in the lesson plans of this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Before deciding on a problem to tackle, they try interviewing local folks about the state of the community's environment and how it has changed through the years.

Click the PDF icon to see the Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Then check out oral-history interviewing tips on the site of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife. Also included below is an audio presentation on deer life by Smithsonian scientist Bill McShea.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
 

Abraham Lincoln: The Face of War

In lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, portraits of Lincoln introduce a study of the Civil War. An analysis of the portraits—including the famous “cracked-plate" photograph, two plaster “life masks," and an eyewitness drawing of Lincoln's arrival in the enemy capital of Richmond, Virginia—leads to an analysis of the times.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and larger images of the portraits.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
11
 

The Universe: An Introduction

This issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom includes a lesson plan in which the class arranges pictures of heavenly bodies according to the students' best ideas of size, distance, and age. This active introduction to the cosmos can be a pre-assessment for a unit on space science. In a follow-up modeling exercise, relationships in space are brought down to a scale of two inches.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and ancillary materials.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

Teaching about the Chicano Movement

This collection gathers resources and artifacts pertaining to the Chicano Movement of the post-WWII era. The following paragraphs, from the Educating Change website, briefly define the movement:

The "Chicano Movement" has been used by historians to describe a moment of ethnic empowerment and protest among Americans of Mexican descent beginning in the 1960s. "Chicano" had long existed as a pejorative term among young Mexican Americans prior to this period. By the 1960s, however, young Mexican Americans embraced the label, reinscribing it with notions of pride in ones' Mexican heritage and defiance against institutions and individuals who practiced or condoned discrimination against Mexicans.

The "movement" or movimiento was really a convergence of multiple movements that historians have broken down into at least four components: [1] A youth movement represented in the struggle against discrimination in schools and the anti-war movement; [2] the farmworkers movement; [3] the movement for political empowerment, most notably in the formation of La Raza Unida Party; and [4] the struggle for control and ownership over "homelands" in the US Southwest (http://www.brown.edu/Research/Coachella/chicano.ht...). We will add an additional component of [5] creating art and music to reflect and voice cultural pride.

Students will review the collection here and identify five items that connect to one of the components listed above. They will then create their own collection that acts as a digital exhibit, teaching others about the Chicano Movement. This assignment is described in further detail on the last resource in this collection.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
36
 

The Mexican-American War: Before, During, and After

The purpose of this collection is to have students consider the causes and consequences of the Mexican-American War. Students will analyze each item in the collection and determine whether it represents the time period before the war, during, or after. Then students will answer a set of broad questions about the war. While most items in the collection have accompanying text, students may need to consult their textbooks or outside resources in order to answer some questions.
Kate Harris
18
5833-5856 of 6,091 Collections