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Found 625 Collections

 

Exploring American Ideals in Art

How can American ideals be defined and expressed in different ways? The United States of America is associated the ideals of Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality. Those values have served as sources of inspiration for artists as goals that the nation aspires to (even if they are not always achieved). This collection contains artworks inspired by one or more of the ideals listed above. Students should choose a work and identify which ideal it relates to: Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality.

In a short essay based on the artwork, students should answer the following questions:

-How would the student define Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, or Equality?

-What is the artist trying to communicate about how this idea plays out in America?

-Does the student agree or disagree with the artist's interpretation?

If desired, students could create their own artwork based on one of the American ideals.

Kate Harris
21
 

Numbers

This collection is an example of how the Learning Lab could be used to create number or alphabet books for younger students. Students can search for the numbers and letters represented in the art, sculpture, and artifacts that exist throughout the Learning Lab.

Alternatively, students could be given a specific theme (animals, for example) and be tasked to find images representing the theme for each letter or number. Annotation (notebook tabs) can be used to include additional text or explanations. Quiz questions could be used to ask "how many ________ are in this image?".

Have fun!

Tags: reading, books, alphabet, numbers, counting, math, young learners, early childhood

Kate Harris
17
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Kate Harris
14
 

African American Artists and Ancient Greek Myth: Teacher's Guide

This teacher's guide explores how myths transcend time and place through three modern paintings by African American artists, who reinterpret Ancient Greek myth to comment on the human experience. Collection includes three paintings and a lesson plan published by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, which includes background information on myths and artists, as well as activity ideas. Also includes a video about the artist Romare Bearden and his series 'Black Odyssey.' The video details his artistic process, the significance of storytelling in his art, and the lasting importance of 'Black Odyssey.'

Tags: greece

Tess Porter
5
 

Powerful Symbols and Words: Abolitionism & Women's Rights

This collection looks at an image and phrase used widely in abolitionist materials, and at how that symbol was adopted and adapted by Sojourner Truth and/or other women's rights activists. Students will examine an abolitionist medallion and then learn about Sojourner Truth through a short reading, image analysis, and video. They can then review two version's of Sojourner Truth's speech and consider why the second version, as reported by another suffragette, Frances Gage, is markedly different. This collection is designed to be used as a short stand-alone lesson on the topic of the abolition movement and its intersection with the women's movement in the United States.

Tags: compare and contrast, change over time, "Ain't I a Woman?", abolition, slavery

Kate Harris
4
 

Investigating a Place: The Pacific Northwest

What defines a place? Is it its people? Economic life? Physical characteristics?

Examine this collection of images from or about the Pacific Northwest (loosely defined as Washington and Oregon states and British Columbia) to answer these questions: What are its unique set of physical and cultural conditions? How do these physical and cultural conditions interact? How does the economy of the PNW connect to its culture and geography? What are the consequences of human activity on the cultural and physical landscape?

Ask students individually or in small groups to create a collection in Learning Lab to represent the physical and cultural characteristics of another place (city, region, state). Using these collections, ask students to write summary statements describing the unique human and physical characteristics of places researched. Discuss student collections and what makes each place unique.

Tags: Portland, Seattle, Oregon, Washington, Vancouver, Native Americans, American Indians, grunge, space needle

Kate Harris
38
 

Art reflecting Life

Art, posters and artifacts that reflect events and viewpoints changing over time. Make sure you refer back to the questions on canvas!

magough
7
 

University of Brasilia- Brazilian music

Esta coleção está destinada a mostrar um pouco da diversidade musical do Brasil

Adriana Dornellas
25
 

University of Brasilia - comics

desenhos em quadrinhos que não possuem cores

Joana Diniz
26
 

Resources for Teaching African-American History

A collection of teaching resources about African-American history, from slavery to modern-day. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. This collection will be updated frequently and includes both individual artifacts and lesson plans.

Kate Harris
38
 

Discover the Story: A Miner's Life

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in as a miner. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.

Tags: Pennsylvania, narrative, Pittsburgh, mining, miner, immigration, coal, worker safety, child labor
Kate Harris
16
 

Emmett Till: Confronting a Difficult History

This collection looks at how a tragic incident like the murder of Emmett Till is remembered in American history and national memory, as well as the significance of the decision of Till's mother, Mamie Mobley-Till, to share her son's loss publicly with an open-casket. Her actions created a galvanizing moment for the modern civil rights movement, heightening its significance and influence. The collection includes photographs, art work, and two newspaper articles about modern memorials to Till and other lynching victims.

Teachers might use the following images as the basis for silent discussion (see the Big Paper strategy from Facing History, included on the last resource) prior to a group conversation on the following questions:
-How did this case impact the civil rights movement?
-What were the effects of having an open casket at Till's funeral? How does media continue to impact the civil rights movement?
-How should Emmett Till be remembered and honored? How should his mother be remembered and honored?
-Should national memorials and museums include objects like Till's original casket or the soil from lynching sites? Why or why not?

Kate Harris
7
 

Money, Money, Money

A examination of currency from various cultures and eras.
Brian Ausland
19
 

A Hero's Journey

in progress

This collection is designed to be used across several days in conjunction with any study of literary heroes. The last page includes a description of how I plan to use the collection with a group of 6th graders studying The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan.

#npgteach
Alison Gillmeister
15
 

Migration at the U.S.-Mexico Border

This activity helps students consider the human experience of migration by analyzing a portrait using "jumping in" strategies to describe the sensory experience; answering a series of guided questions to interpret the portrait before and after reading the informational text about the artist and portrait; and finally, reading relevant articles about migration at the US-Mexican border and using academic vocabulary to describe the push and pull factors at play and other characteristics of this example of migration.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery’s 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.
TAGS: #NPGteach, portrait, learning to look, National Portrait Gallery

The collection was originally intended for use in Human Geography, specifically the unit on Population Demographics and Migration.

As this collection description is directed toward teachers, the collection itself is written and structured for student use and could be completed independently, in a group classroom setting and/or online.
Kristin Kowalew
4
 

Erosion

Science unit 4
Erin Carrico
6
 

The Valentine Dress from the Outwin Collection

This lesson plan and its extensions are designed to facilitate students' observations of art and then extend to an essay writing assignment. A follow-up writing unit will follow when my sophomores will write a memoir in which they incorporate their own growing up experiences and memories of hurt, frustration, loneliness, joy, and discovery. The best of these products will be submitted to the Scholastic Writing contest and will follow the word count/formatting guidelines dictated by the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards: http://www.artandwriting.org/.

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

TAGS: #NPGteach ; portrait; National Portrait Gallery
Jennifer Seavey
12
 

Analyzing Cultural Identity

The following lesson is intended for high school students in an ICT English Language Arts classroom.

By the end of the lesson, students (ages 14-18), will be able to determine a central idea about identity by analyzing multiple texts. Students will apply their understanding of artwork (George Catlin's "Wi-jún-jon, Pigeon's Egg Head (The Light) Going To and Returning From Washington") to one or more poems that share conflicting themes of identity. Students are assessed on their ability to create claims, support claims with evidence, synthesize information from multiple sources, and develop a central idea about identity.


#SAAMteach
Nick Verrillo
5
 

Reconstruction

Students analyze works of art from the end of the Civil War and Reconstruction to better understand this tumultous time in our nation's history.
Nick Odem
3
 

Textured Portraits

Students will analyze portraits for the message or expression communicated through portraits with exceptional texture. Contributing to a discussion with the 30 second look, students will look at an image from the 2016 Outwin exhibit to look deeper and explore and infer the artist's intent and interpret meaning. Students will utilize previously made photobooth self-portraits to begin exploration of Photoshop filters. Each student will create a new and originally produced textured portrait. Further extensions to analyze portraits include: conversation extender and contrast and compare. #NPGteach
Jennifer Fox
16
 

Harlem Renaissance: Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence

A compare/contrast of Langston Hughes and Jacob Lawrence, integral figures in the Harlem Renaissance. Created as part of the Learning to Look Summer Teaching Institute at the National Portrait Gallery.

#NPGteach
Inez Koberg
4
 

Martin Luther King

This Collection of resources highlights key events in the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. It includes resources that illustrate the Montgomery bus boycott, his Letter from a Birmingham Jail, the March on Washington and his I Have A Dream speech and finally, images and a video from his assassination and funeral.

Key Terms:
Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights leader
Activist
Black rights
African American rights
Equality
Linda Muller
22
 

Pittsburgh 1932

This is a collection of images and documents that give historical context for the poem "Pittsburgh 1932." The poem itself tracks a city's changing economic landscape during war years and the Great Depression.

Students can use this collection directly to explore the literature and history.
Kate Harris
25
 

Surrender at Appomattox

This is a lesson designed around the portrait "The Room in the McLean House, at Appomattox Court House, in which General Lee Surrendered to General Grant," and is intended to be used when teaching about General Lee's surrender. #npgteach
Jamie Grace
7
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